(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "73 Magazine (May 1995)"

Hills E 



lorer 



Mimco 6 Meter Mobile 





Its ilH^i't' 



COnl S REMOVABLE REMOTE CONTROL PANEL IS A FIRST! - 

ICOM*s superior tcchnologj^ and design have once again produced a first in 
the amateur world mih the IC-ZIA - a dual-band handheld (2M/440 MHz) 
Willi a coulrol pimel that detaches from the body of the radio. Belter 
Ihan a speaker-nuc, it pro\1des a full functional displav of 
aU operailng coDdiiioos (including bands and 
frequencies) and complete control of 

volttme, opemdng modes, tuning, scan, 
band selection*, OVOFE and FIT 
The remote control panel is a 
standard feature that conies with an 
extension cable and lape! cUp, and is 
backlit for nighl time operation. Clip 
the main body' to your belt or put it in a 
pocket or purse. For mobile operation, it 
can be easily positioned where it ^von"t 
interfere with driving. 

ALPHANUMERIC MEMORY DISPLAY - Up to 6 
characters provide quick and eas}' memory 
cEmnnel identification. A total of IO4 ^^ mL 
memories (46 regular and 6 "" ^^^ 

scan edge per band) may be displayed 
by memory^ channel and either the 
freqnenn- or alpha name (does 
not reduce the total number of 
memories available). An EEPROM 
prevx^nts losing memory 
information if the 
batter)' runs down. 






• FEATURES • 

• Indepenjenl tuning knobs 

• Power MOS FET PA mocfiiie 

• Multiple power-saver hjjidiorrs 

• ImpressivE outiiD outpuj 

• 700 mAh nitad hnttery 

• Bottery voltage reodout 

• ^UHF/UHF VHF/VHF, or VHF/UHF 
main/sub oand operalion 

• Simultaneous receive on both bands 

• Slim design. Weighs only 1 3,4 oz 



J^ 



MESSACE AND 
PAGING - 

Use the alpha display 
to transmit 
and receive ^^^^^^ 
up to 6 characters {using 
DTMF tones) as a simple 
message pager, 
acknowledgments, elc..« 

lASr TO USE BACKLIT KEYPAD- 
The key^ are large. \*ell-spaced and 
backlit, Ke\'pad labels are eas\^ to 
understand, eliminating the need Eur 
an internal "guide" function. 

CALL KOM'S FREE BROCHURE 
HOTUNE: (206) 450-6088 




dlSSm. 



AU features, 

including the 

dis(il{(Wii 

iilphumtmencs. 

(grated in the 
$itigk* imii 

configttr- 
aiiou 



Operation copohle wilb 4.5V to 1 6V 
externoi power supply 

cress encode standard (tone decode 
and lone scon with optional 117-93) 

Hew HS-85 oplionol headset 

Auto repealer offset and memory 

Selectable DTMF auto dioiing speed 

Adjustable power output (3 levels) 

Cainpatible vritfi the BC79A drop-in 
charger (AD-Sl required) 

• MARS/CAP modifiable 



Herx 



&»«^ 



ICOM Americo, Iol 2380-1 1 6th Avim Nl, Behw, WA 91004 UiJl Tedotkot support 206^S4'761 ! 



3(TbI^ ilF ^ 01 lit! I 
:i« rV). aa bMl J 



■i/^p 



^ ^ fli C 



9 « O •^ 



« €J O 



^y W> & 
O ^ ^l" 



CmCLE 179 on READER SERVFCE CARD 



JRC 




160-10 Meters PLUS 6 Meter Transceiver 



n 




Fifteen reasons why your next HF 
transceiver should be a JST-245~ - - 



1 



1 



2 



3 



4 



5 



6 



7 



All-Mode Operation (SSB,CWAM.AFSK,F1VI) on ail HF amateur 
bands and 6 meters. JST-145, same as JlST-245 but without 6 
meters and built-in antenna tuner. 

ic JST>145 COMING SOOK -k 

MOSFET POWER AMPURER • Final PA utilizes Rf MOSFETs 
to achieve low distortion afKl high durability. Rated output is 10 
to 150 watts on all bands rnctuding 6 meters, 

AUTOMATIC ANTENNA TUNER • Auto tuner included as 

standard equipment. Tuner settings are automatically stored 
in memory for fast QSY. 

MULTIPLE ANTENNA SELECTION • Three antenna cx>nnec- 
tions are user selectable from front panel Antenna selection can 
be stored in memory. 

GENERAL COVERAGE RECEIVER • 100 kHz-30 MH^, plus 48- 
54 MHz receiver Electronically tuned fronl-end filtering, quad- 
FET mixer and quadruple conversion system (triple conversion 
for FM) results in excellent dynamic range (>1 OOdB) and 3rd order 
lCPof+20dBm, 

IF BANDWIDTH FLEXIBILITY • Standard 2,4 kHz filter can be 
narrowed continuously to 800 Hz with variable Bandwidth Control 
(BWC). Narrow SSB and CW filters for 2nd and 3rd IF optional. 

QRM SUPPRESSJON • Other interference rejection features 
include Passband Shift (PBS), dual noise blanker S-step RF atten- 
uation, IF notch filter, selectable AGC and all-mode sqitelch. 



8 
9 

10 

11 



12 
13 
14 



15 



NOTCH TRACKING * Once tuned, the [F notch filter will track the 
offending heterodyne (::: 1 Khz) if the VFO frequency is changed. 

DDS PHASE LOCK LOOP SYSTEM • A single-crystal Direct 
Digital Synthesis system is utilized for very low phase noise. 

C W FEATURES • Full break-in operation, variable CW pitch, built 
in electronic keyer up to 60 wpm. 

DUAL VFOs • Two separate VFOs for split-frequency operation. 
Memory registers store most recent VFO frequency, mode, band- 
width and other important parameters for each band. 

200 MEMORIES • Memory capacity of 200 channels, each of 
which store frequency, mode. AGC and bandwidth. 

COMPUTER INTERFACE • Buiit-in RS-232C interface for 
advanced computer appffcations. 

ERGONOMIC UWOUT* Front panel features easy to read color 
LCD display and thoughtful placement of controls for ease of oper- 
ation. 

HEAVY-DUTY POWER SUPPLY • Built-in switching power 
supply with ''silent" cooling system designed for continuous 
transmission at maximim output. 



JRC| 0GpanfkuiloCo,,JUd. 



430 Park Ava. 2nd Floor New York, NY 1 0022 Phone: (212) 355-1 1 SO Fax: (21 2) 319-5227 

CIRCLE 1S9 ON ftEAOEB SERVICE CARD 



1 





^k 




I 

I 



1 






m 

No matter what your frequency requirements (2, 6, 10, 220, 44Q), when you buy a 
mono-bander factory-direct from Azden, j ou'll enjoy these five great advantages; 

POW ERj Handhelds-5 wafts, Mobiles- 50 watts, f25w on 220MH2, and 35w on 
440MHz.) Standard! f 

FACTOk. -DIRECT S...iVlCi^iND TECHNICAL SF^^ORT; Factor engineers 
and tecKnicians perform all sen. ice, and our sales staff are hams, with years of experience. 

RELIABILITY ! All Azden radios are hea\y-dut3^ commercial grade 
(designed to MIL-STD-810),and are virtually ''maintenance free". 

FLEXIRir in We go the extra step, like CAP and MARS mods 
at no charge, vHth proper documentatTon. 



T^\ O YEAR^\\;\RR;\iXTl : The only manufacmrer confident 
enough to offer this, everything is covered for tiie first year, and 
we only charge for labor in the second year, jh ^ 

So whether youVe buying ^JL^UlttSli V^^J # \^^ L^C I il 

b.i i"ii II 1- MBt^K^'^^ ^^-^ ^^*^^^ COMMUNJCATIONfi DIVISION 

lie, handheld radio ,^ 



or communications 
head set » come to Azden* 
We understand. 



WF EIF (ify BBT 

wa iif ffl> mr 

W Kff B? IBT 



B? SBF 
i. .f , 



ftEOEH RtaniA«.tl 



MOBILES 



PCS-7000H 



PCS-7200 



2 Meters 



220 MiU 



PCS-7500H 



KCS-7500H 



PCS-7S00H 



-I-IOMH/ 



6 Mfii^rh 



10 \Wf4M^ 



R\NDHELDS 



Az-n 



AZ^6l 



AZ^21A 



to Mtttrft 



ft Metcra 



2 Mvu'i s 



HEADPHONES 



HS-0.- 



DM*10 



With R<.>i>in iMit 



Withfiui Mil 



'•^ V'l ,L_ 

WW PPT 

r ■^" ^^ l-^l 



,v^'-, 






CAi i SitH.f 



^ '-1 



n. hti 



J^-* 






li^ i*j*f 



« -., 



*2llQt 



■l 


4 


H 


¥ 






~ ^ 


i 


i 


\L:^ 






, *^ 



**%i 






**»?:», 



_^ He,. 


^3aeii 




K^ 


1"^ 







.S^.1-*^N 






y^A 



THE TEAM 

PUBLISHER/EDITOR 
Wayne Green W2NSD/1 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Hope Cumer 

SEMIOIVTEOHNICAL EDITORS 
Chaftes Wamngton WAtRZW 
Mike Nugent W88GLO 

EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE 
Joyce Sawtelie 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
Bill Brtiwn WBSELK 
Milce Bfyce WB8VGE 
Joseph E. Carr K4IPV 
Michael Geaer KBIUM 
Jim Gray W1XU/7 
Chuck Houghlon WBSIGP 
Dr. Marc Leavey WA3AJR 
Andy MacAllister WA5ZIB 
Joe Moell KOOV 
Carole Perry WB2MGP 
Jeffrey Sloman NtEWO 

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER 
Dan Harper 
1'603'924-0058 
1-600-274-7373 
FAX: 1-603-924-9327 

TECHMICAL DRAWINGS 
Charles Warrington WA1 RZW 

GRAPHIC DESIGN 
Suzanne Cot^ 

GRAPHIC SERVICES 
FilmWorks. Inc, 
Antrim NH 

GRAPHICS MANAGER/ 
PAGINATION 

Linda Drew 

CIRCULATION 

To subscribe: 1 -8a)-6 77-3838 

WAYNE GREEN, INC. 

Editorial Offices 
70 Route 202N 
Petertxjrough NH D345S 
1-603-924-0058; 
FAX; 1-603-924-9327 

Subscription Services 
1^B0O-€77-S83e 

Foreign Subscribers 
1 -609^6 1-a432 

R^nnts S3-00 P&f article. 
Bade issues $4.00 each 

Wrile lo 73 Anmtmsr RatiiQ Today. 
Reprints, 70 Route 2021^, 
Peterborough, NH 03458. 

Printed \n the USA, by Quad 
Graphics, Thomaston, Georgia, 



-^ —^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^mmw^^^^^i^Bm^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

iBAmateur 

Radio Today 



1995 



Issue #416 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FEATURES 



to Buttder's Guide to the Universe 

A beginner's guide to home-brewing. 

WBBVGE 

18 Wart Remover 

Build this easy module to eliminate 
unsightly wall parasites from your shack. 
, ..,».... ..WB8VGE 

34 8 Meters — ^The fn-Between Band 
Excitement for all license classes. 
_„„„,„„ ..WB6N0A 

40 A Foolproof Power Controller 
Be prepared when the commercial 
poller shuts off ..KN4HL 

44 K4SYU Loop Antenna 

A compact, portabte HP solution. 
,».K4SYU 



REVIEWS 



24 TheTrfdentTR-1200 Wide-Range 
Monitor Scanner 

Listen to the world with this compact 
little unit, Z^. N1QGS 

30 The Oak Htlls Explorer Kit 

Build a fun, inexpensive and quaiity 
CW rig. ...,.AC4HF 



36 The Allnco DR-M06 

A new 6 meter mobile transceiver. 

....WB6NOA 




DEPARTMENTS 



60 Above and Beyond 

73 Ad Index 

70 Ask K a boom 

64 ATV 

81 Barter 'n' Buy 

SO Carr's Corner 

17 Feedback ln<tex 

53 Ham Help 

72 Hams with Class 

56 Hamsats 

52 Homing In 

6 Letters 

4 Never Say tHe 
SO 
58 

at 

66 
8 
68 
77 
86 



65 



New Products 

Packet & Computers 

Propagation 

QRP 

QRX 

RTTY Loop 

Special Events 

Uncle Wayne's 

Bookshelf 

Updates 



■ ■■«i -I **»« + «« PH 



38 The Comet HA4S 

A mobile HF antenna. 



.N2PMG 



What are Carats Perry WB2MGP and 
CBtptain Curtis Carver N2XJF doing on 
the grounds of West Point? And 
what's that arttenna in the back- 
ground? Turn to page 72 to find out. 



FEEDBACK... 
FEEDBACK! 

It s like being there — ri^lii 
here in our offices! How? 
Jnsr rake adviiniage of our 
FEEDBACK li^r (in 
ptige 17. You'll nmice 
n feedb.^ck number Jit 
I lie beginning of each 
anicle and column, We d 
like you to rale whitE you 
read so that we tan prim 
what type!i of thingii you 
like best. 



On me cover Jason Auvenshine N7UGP Bob Buchanan KA7CC. and Jerry Cfark K7KZ home in on what later turned out 
to be a hoax "emergency^ signal. Turn to page 52, fiorr}ing in,"' for detaits. (Photo ty David Sanders, The Arizor^a DaiJy 
Siar Reprinted with permission.) 




Eifllorlal Offices 

70 Route 202 M 

PetertJOrQugh NH 03458 
phof^: 603-924-0058 

Advertisfng Offices 
70 Route 202N 

Pe!ertx>roiigli NH 03458 

plwne: 8CX>-274-7373 

Circulation Offices 
70 Route 2021^ 

PeteftX>r(Hi^ NH 03458 

phom: 603-924-0058 



Manuscripts Cootribuiions ifi (tie (orm (rf manuscnpls with drawings and-or photographs are weioome and 
wtB be considered for pos&ibte publication. We can assume no responsibility tot loss or darriage lo any mate- 
rial. Rease ertdose a stamped, self^addressed envelope wiUi each sutwntssion. Payment for the use o* any 
msolicited material will be made upon put)l*cation. Please submrt all material on disk as ^i IBM-conpatibte 
ASCII file. AT contribulions should be directed to I he 73 edit on a! otfices "How to Wme fw 73 ' guidelines art 
available upon requesi US oti^efls musi include Iheir Sooal Secynty numtjer witt^ sutxnitted manu&cripis, 

73 Amateur Radio Today IISSN 1052-2522) is puWistied monihiy by Wayne Green Ihc. 70 Roufe 202 
North. Peiefborough NH 03458 Enlire conien^s .19^ try Wayne Green Inc NO part ot thts pubhcation niay 
be refHoduced wiihoui wimer pemusson ol the publisher. For Subsaiption Services, witie to 73 Amatmir 
Radkf Today. RO. Box 7693, Rrveiton WJ 06077-76M. or caU 1*600-289-0388. The subscnption rale ^s: otm 
year 524,97. two years S39.97; Cwiada S34.21 fOf one year. S57.75 for two years, including postage ar>d 
7% GST Foreign postage: Si 9 00 surface or $42 00 ainnail adcBtional per year. All foteign orders must be 
accompanied tjy paymeni in US funds. Second dass postage paid ai Petertxjcough, NH. and at additional 
m^ing offices Canadran secofld dass inai iegisJTatk>n #17B101 Canatfian GST ne^stration #1253933 14. 
Wcrofilm EdiiJof>— Univer^ny Microfilm. Ann Art»r Ml 4flio6, POSTMASTER: Semi adcfeess changes lo 
73 Amateur f^r^ Today, P.Q. Box 7693, Bverton NJ 08077-7693. 

Contract UtM3h! Ely Jetting your gaze wmvset to this pafag^apn. you've |ust become l^al^ and r^ioraly bour^d 
to help save the nsm Semor/Techfwcal Editckr's butt Luckily lor you, ii wonl be tWciiL Jusi sefid mteresting han^ 
related photos for out Ptxjto Search, as described in QRX (September 1994, p. 8). Its a win4ose si!uation— 
your photo mtgrt became a cover, ami i might be tofced to iteep thts emmmy job.— Muge WBflGLO 



73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 3 



Numt^er 1 on your Feedback card 



Ni 



EVER SAY DIE 



Wayne Green W2NSD/1 



Preterring the Snail 

Fomi0f ?3 Editor Bill Brown pickecf 
If} a bynch of stuff about me fi-cwn the 
Internet. It came at a fortuitous time, 
Syf>ctiFDnidty at wocfe Oh, you haven I 
read Synchrofttaty by David Peat? 

IVe been under (ncreasing pressufe 
to ditnb aboard Ihe internet and at 
least enioy the womJers of E*mail. tve 
been resisting. You can see the heel 
marks as my so-called friends have 
been dragging me kickicig and scream- 
ing into the infomiation age. 

t keep telling 'em thai fve been 
itiere and done thai. Welt, I have. And. 
as I read the pile of culch Bill pulled ofl 
Ihe Internet, my RAM was refreshed 
Oh yes. that's why I have been fighting 
E-mail. 

RTTY, the First E-Mafl 

ft all started back in 1948 when I 
was working as chief cameraman for 
WPtx in New York. That's the Daily 
News TV station. They had no objec- 
tion to my setting up my 2m rig on top 
of the News Buildirrg, one of Ihe more 
modest skyscrapers on 42nd Street In 
midtown. I found an empty room next 
to the TV transmitter, with a door open- 
ing out onto the roof. I bought a 16-Gle- 
ment beam from Sill Hoisington 
W2BAV and set it yp on a surplus 
prop-pitch motor out on a narrow 
ledge, i was using an SCR-522 I'd 
converted to 2m. It had an 832 In the 
final and put out a healthy signal. 

The ledge was a little tricky. I want- 
ed to get my beam out in the clear as 
much as 1 could, and the best spot for 
it had me going from the roof area out 
on a foot -wide ledge with a 30 -floor 
fJrop on one side and a 15-floor drop 
on the other. I felt like I was walking a 
tightrope when I looked down. It was 
not a good ptace to be when there was 
any wind ai alL 

Wow, was I abfe to worK out from 
that fantastic location! I had no prot> 
lem working all ot Connecticut and 
New Jefsey. 8ut I wonderect what on 
earth those strange beedle-beedle 
sounds were I kept hearing yp on 
147,96 MHz. It turned Out to be ham 
Teletype, which was Iseing promoted 
by John Williams W2BFD from his 
radio-TV repair shop tn Woodside. 
Queens, After a couple of visits to 
John I was busy building my own 
RTTY terminal. It had around 20 of so 
6SN7GTS and not only translated the 
two tones into phntirig with a Model 12 
Teletype mactitne. but also had auto- 




malic almost everythlrrg. ft shut down 
when the signal stopped. It would turn 
on automatically and copy any mes- 
sage on the RTTY channel. It would 
even turn on my ng and confirm the re- 
ceipt of a message with a beep- beep. 

I helped John set up the RTTY re- 
peater and this made it so every RTTY 
operator in greater New York could 
keep in touch without having to swing 
iheir beams. 

A Lot Like ?5m 

Bui after awhile I discovered what 
I'd noticed on 7Siii back in 1946. when 

I used to talk just about every night 
with WiMLJ [n Barre (VT). WlIF in 
Peabody ^MA). and WlKPL in Jaffrey 
(NH). It wasn t long before we were 
just rag-chewing and joking, and little 
of any importance was being commu- 
nicated. I wasrl either learning or 
teaching anything. Finally, it occurred 
to me, hey, why am t doing this? Why 
am I wasting my time for hours a day 
like this? 

The excitement of RTTY communi- 
cations was enough tor a while. Then I 
began to notice that the benefits to me 
were fading, I enjoyed the technical 
challenge, f had great fun getting 
everything working, I had a ball up on 

II meters pioneering RTTY, back 
when ttiat was an anything-goes ham 
band , . . which we lost because we 
didn't use it enough. We wereni per- 
mitted to use frequsncy-shift on the 
low bands then, I went on 80m with 
make -break keying instead of frequen- 
cy-shih. and soon had made the first 
coast-to-coast contact with Bob Weit- 
brecht W6NRM. a deaf ham. All this 
was fun. but the content of the mes- 
sages I was getting was the same old 
stuff, with a high boring quotient. 

I wanted to help make my transmis- 
sions interesting, so 1 wrote little arti- 
cles, stored them on punched tape and 
ted them through my tape reader at 60 
wpm to anyone mterested. It was a Jot 
like a BBS. That tape experience 
turned out to t)e very heJpful a couple 
years later when a RTTY ham gave 
me an opportunity to work on a 
Guggenheim Grant on a color organ 
for trie Guggenheim Museum on Frfth 
Avenue. The color organ programs 
were all mn by punched tape. 

My adventure with RTTY tunned out 
to be serendipitous again, for it was 
through Graham Claylor, one of the 
NYC RTTYers. that I got the job as 
Secretary of the Music Research 
Foundation, where I had the opporttjni- 



ty to work with several of the top psy- 
ch tat rists. psychotogists. and psycho- 
anaiysts on the use of music in psy- 
dio therapy I ended up writing a book. 
Mustc ^or Your Moods, which the 
FoMrtdation published. My first lx>o*«. 
Just the other day I was looking 
through a box of t>adges and buttons 
and came across the medal I won in 
high school fof music recognition. I 
also came across a medal from the 
ARRL for winning the 1947 I5tli Inter- 
national DX Competition. I'll bet 
they Ve stopped sending out medals to 
contest winners. 

Losing My Buttons 

I was thinking of adding those 
medals to the pins and buttons on trie 
73 baseball cap I've been wearing at 
hamtesis. but I hen I remembered that 
no one has ever asked what ail the 
pins are. Well, since nobody has ever 
noticed, why bother? After all, they're 
atl just my own personal memories. My 
WWII submarine combat pin, pins and 
buttons from my high school, college, 
electronics schooL QCWA. OOTC, AR- 
RL 50 years, Boy Scouts, Porsche 
Club of America. PS199 fn Brooklyn, 
SCCA Competition Driver, 1939 
Wortd^s Fair, Skin Diver, USS Drum 
SSN677. Deputy Sheriff Harris County, 
ITU Conference m Geneva. Erasmus 
Hall Choral Club, AOPA. Nurburg Ring 
Racetrackp Royal Jordanian Amateur 
Radio Society, an old 220 Use it Or 
Lose II button, and so on. Just an oFd 
man's memories and ol no interest to 
anyone el^e. I'll put the hat up in the 
attic. 

The color organ project was due to 
another RTTYer. I started a RTTY 
newsletter in 1951 whtle I was working 
at WXEL in Cleveiand as a T\^ direaor. 
Wefl, they bad a mimeo machine. That 
quickly put me in touch with all the oth- 
er RTTYers around the country. And 
that eventually got me a RTTY cofumn 
in ca which led to my being the edt- 
tor, which got me to start 73, 
after being fired from CO. Thafs a sto- 
ry I teit every now and thefi, so I wonl 
refresh your memory with it again. 

No Big Bang? 

I mentioned Bill Hoisington's beam 
After [ staffed 73 Bilt moved to Peter- 
iKirough and wrote endless simple 
construction articles for the magazine 
as K1CLL. He was endlessly creative 
up until his death a few years ago My 
recent bnjsh with cosmology, the resttlt 
of my interest in cold fusion, has 



brought be up against some most In- 
teresting people, some of whom are 
not a! atl convinced about that Big 
Bang theory, Bili wasn't either He pro- 
posed that light just naturally ruris 
down. I published an artide by him on 
the subject. 

Well, one problem with cold fusion 
Fs that currently-held theories of 
physics say it's imposstl>le- To true be- 
lievers in these theories, every one of 
the ei^rimenters who have been gel- 
ling anomalous heat are wrong, They 
must all somehow have made eitperi- 
menta! errors. The experimenters, 
some of wtiom are getting thousands 
of times more heat than the ^'accepted** 
theory permits, say it's at>out Ume to 
rethink theory. 

Trouttemakers point out that when 
fight goes through water or glass, it 
skiws ctown. Weil, we know that space 
isn't empty. Its got a lot of hydrogen 
and helium, plus detds from past no* 
vas. Then there's the 90% of so of in- 
visililG something (dark matter) which 
is exerting a powerful gravitationat in- 
fluence on iU& galaxies we can see. It 
might tie It^t alt this stuff tends to slow 
down light and that the red-shrft is due 
to that instead of all the other galaxies 
flying away from us. That would give 
us a sfeady-state universe arid woutd 
fit in bener with calcufatk^ns in the bio- 
togicai and other fields. 

TTiis cokii fusion stuff sure is making 
trouble, and it isn't going away. I'm 
writing this the day after a one-day 
cofd fusion conference at MIT where I 
saw some fascinating demonstrations. 
For instance, one chap exptained how 
to buiid a gun capable of shooting fair- 
ly large projectiles into outer space just 
by passirig an electric current through 
a small amount of plain water. He 
siiowed a quarter-inch metal plate with 
a hole caused by a blast of water be- 
ing shot through it. 

Well, you're probably not interested 
in all that stuff. If you're an average 
ham^ you'll be more interested to Know 
that it s snowing right now and that on 
my morning jog I saw the tracks ot 
several deer, some rabbits, and a 
bunch of squirrels crossing the road. 
The snow, which took Its sweet time to 
come, is beautiful, 

I was most pleased to meet a cou- 
ple of hams at the conference who 
blamed me for their interest in cold fu- 
sion. Well, as they pointed out, I was 
right atxHJt the development of cellular 
phones and computers, so perhaps I'm 
right again, I haven t seen anything yet 
thafs not encouraging. But then, these 
new technologies always take a lot 
longef ttian 1 expect to develop, it took 
mkrocxjmpuiers 20 years to get where 
I thought itiey would be jn 10. As you 
watch tfte computer ads on TV. just re- 
member that old Uncle Wayne tried 
hard to get hams invotved back in 
1975, Many of those who did made 
mitlkMis. 

One of the MIT undergrads at ttte 
cokj fusion conference showed us a lit- 
tle glass with a couple of inches of wa- 
ter {40 ml) and a small pallaOrum rod 
he had been sticking into the glass. He 
showed us the curves of the excess 
heat he'd been getting. It look him 
awhile to get everything right, but ncm 

Continued on page 74 



4 73AmatBur Radio Today fVJay, 1995 



Now 

The G)inpany That Takes 
Around The Worid Lets\buTake 

Worid Aiound With You. 




The Drake 
Performance In An 

The compare that has been 
setting the standaitls in premium- 
quanty ^vorld tend shortwave 
^rformance no\v puts top^jf- 
the-line features and technology 
at your fingertips with the 
SW8. . .wherever you wani to 
take ft Designed for both desktop 
use and easy portability, the 



SW8 - Finaliyr Professional Desktop 
Affordable, Portable World Band Shortwave. 



Drake SW8 includes many of 
the ame features that have made 
Drake a perennial favorite of 
experts - superib audfo, versatfity. 
and the unique combinalion of 
professional quality and functional 
simpficity. So tune in the world 
and get the best of all worids- 
quallty and allordabilily, desktop 



tBchnoiogy and portiibility. 
The Drate SWS. 
To order your SW8 direct, 
jor more injortnalion^ or jar 

iht dealirnearest you call 

1-800-968-7753 



DRAKE 





R.L Drake Company * RQ. Box 3006 •Mmisburg, OH 45343 'U-SA 

CIRCLE 147 ON 



OHeSS In R.L Dvik&Ccrnpany 



SERVICE CAHO 



Lehers 



Number 2 05 your Feedback card 



Lionel Barley KBOPZD, Wichita 
KS Well I made it back into Ham ra^ 
die. I hefd WBOHRQ as a G$fi«fal 
Class operator in &>e late 1970s- Then 
I ended up wrth one of ttrose r^ew-fan- 
gted 'f\igh-tecfi/fiigh-pay' careers ir^ 
the earty 1980s, Folks said I needed 
another college degree tn order to be 
qualified for the worl; I was af ready do- 
ing, so I went to nigl^i sctiool , . . letting 
my ticket lapse along the way . . and 
got a degree In computer science. By 
that Unie technology had already made 
that career obsoietet and I embarKed 
on anothsr ''hsgh-lech/high-pay" ca- 
reer. Now, wouldn't you know, that of 
technology just kept a-changing. 
Scratch "hlgh-tech/high-pay" career 
number two, Oh indeed, mainframes 
were just & bit clunky compared to 
PCs, 

Wayne, now Tm on "high-tech-sans- 
hlgh-pay'* career r^umber three. Ar^d I 
em starting to see this one going away 
Tve been working in industrial and 
aerospace manufacturing fof 20 years. 
The new PC software coming out is 
eh mi na ting any need for advanced 
mathermatlcs. or even id tove much of 
any expenence in machining process- 
es. The smarts are in the box rather 
than in the head of an analyst'pro- 
grammer. Maybe i1 I went into busi- 
ness for myself on the side . . , , 

Since the company I wofk for (days) 
has cut my hmts so mucti, I have t^ad 
Hte lime to go back and work on get- 
ting another ham ticket. I m back again 
as a General Class operator, sMIl en- 
joying CW on low bands just as much 
as ever This time I am going after that 
Advanced license. Heck, I may even 
get gutsy and try for my Extra. Love 
those ripplin' dits! 

Scott Schram KN4L, Birmingham 
AL Wayne, your March 1995 editorial 
about hamming being irrelevant sn the 
face of the Internet is right on target, 
ril bet most hams don't realize the 
amazing things tf^at are already iJeirrg 
done . , . Id like to tefl you about one 
night s activity. 

Last fMght I connected to the Inter- 
net by caJiing a service provider on a 
14,400 bps modem (soon to be 
28,800 bps . . - and not Jong after tttat 
using ISDN at 128.000 bps). I used 
Telnet to connect \q a "Moo," a text- 
based virtual reality, and I met some of 
ffly fnends that IVe talked to regularly 
over the last year They are located 
around the LI,S,. two in Holland, one in 
Nonway, two in Canada, and one in 
Australia. About 10 of us carried on a 
discussion about a programming pro- 
ject that we're mutually interested in. 
Tiie connection is QRM-free, and very 
close to 100% reliabte, 24 ho^urs a day 
. . . which makes HF hamming Into 
something of a quaint novetty. 

After that, I enjoyed a game of 
"Scrabbte"* moderated by a distant 



From the Ham Shack 

computer, and my competitors were 
several thousand miles away. Speak- 
ing of games , . . well, virtual reality is 
here. I then togged onto a Multi-User 
Dungeon tMUO]. Teamed with some 
of my editorial friends, and wielding 
our swofds. we proceeded to dispatch 
a number of foul creatures and villains. 

Clearly the Internet wilt do far more 
10 promote international goodwill than 
we could ever hope to accomplish with 
QRM-packed meaningless exctianges 
of signal reports. 

The free exchange of information 
boggles the mind. I loaded my World 
Wide Web (WWW) browser, which is a 
hypertext browser. I just click on the 
highlighted words, and I'm off looking 
at the next interesting thing. It's not 
ynlik© using the help system In Mi- 
crosoft Windows, except that the 
pages you view come from far away 

So I browsed a bit, and came upon 
a page where someone had hooked a 
vkieo camera up outside Uieir building 
in Stockholm, Sweden. 1 transfen^ed a 
live photo of the eariy-moming street 
there to my computef. Another novel- 
ty: I ctiecked the temperalure of some 
guy's ttot tub. and the sensor on the 
Diet Coke can in his refrigerator. 

Then I settle^l down for some seif- 
ous browsing, i downloaded the entire 
text of ttie tjook Phantom of the Opem 
from the Gutenberg project. I browsed 
ttie Louvre museum, and viewed im- 
ages of Impressionist paintings . , 
looked into some protein research arti- 
cles at Johns Hopkins University . . . 
listened to some sound clips of Broad- 
way musicals, and checked ticket 
schedules. With 1.8 million WWW 
pages, it's already the most fabulous 
automated library you've ever seen, 
and it's only beginning to hint al what 
will eventually be done. 

Wayne, I'm a supporter of hiam ra- 
dio ., . every member of my family is a 
ham—my wife Ruthie KD4B0W, and 
daughters Crystie KD4WZY and 
Cefsie KD4ZGR We use 2 meters and 
440 as a conventional way to keep in 
touch. However, ham radio will charhge 
as a result of tfiis revoiulion. 

Jim Robb, DanviJIe KS Wayne. I 
just finished your adilorla] in the 
February 1995 issue of 73 Amateur 
Badk} Today. What a story^ I've been 
"hooked" by Ihe electronics bug ever 
Since a lady gave me a copy of Soys 
Life magazine, on my paper route. 
1955. A little article about shortwave 
listening and a line drawing, 4x4 
Inches, changed my life forever. 

1 could write on for pages: science 
fairs, college electronic lab assistance, 
Texas Instruments, Army airborne 
radar and GCA, cable TV franchises, 
computer software development, a 
computer hardware and service busi- 
ness. Now we are working on a 
matching grant, for funding, to study 



some possibly overlooked parameters 
of tornadoes, which will lead to a smalt 
receiver for residents in rurai areas to 
provide aiitomatic warning and also 
direction and movement, toward or 
away from ifieir focation. 

Ail of the above because of people 
like you. A big tha/tks from all of us. 

Jerry R. Dunham NTMUX 
(DU4MUX}, Rodeo QA Wayne. I've 
been reading 73 for several years, 
since before getting a license and re- 
ally did not understand wfiat you were 
always going on about, as I had never, 
until last week, operated in the US. I 
have made my home in the Philip- 
pines for the last nine years and have 
only been licensed for six. 

For me every contact was Interest- 
Ing^ most were DX, and none were tha 
trash you have described. Last week 
that changed. Since being discharged 
from the Navy 26 years ago I have 
been a merchant seaman — an engi- 
neer, not a radio officer. Last year I 
took a job on a coastwise oil tanker 
engaged in the li.S- West Coast trade. 
Upon my return from vacation this 
time I decided to buy a TS-503 and do 
a little maritime mobiling. The only 
ttiing I can say is tfiat if I were ever to 
live in the U,S. again I think I would 
fast k5se interest in the hobby. 

Keep up the good work with 73 and 
Radio Fun, I take my old cop+es t>ack 
with me to Legazpi for the few hams 
there. 



Vincent Dotva W0GR Hawley MN 

Wayne, I have just finished reading 
your editorial in the March 1995 issue 
of 73 magazine, I always look forward 
lo them in each issue. I agree with so 
much in your writings. This one was 
especially well done. 

On page 73 you struck a chord with 
me when you mentioned the sorry lot 
of QSL cards that will be there when 
one's time comes. Perhaps an inci- 
dent I experienced a couple of weeks 
ago may be of interest. 

A former high school classmate of 
'36 sent me a letter in which was en- 
closed one of my QSL cards dating 
back to April of 1934. Shades of the 
pastf 

She had been browsrng through 
some tables ai a Viking Fesi in Oeco- 
rah, Iowa, and or^e had a coileciton of 
postcards from all over the United 
Stales. She asked if any were from 
Hawley, Minnesota, and one of the 
two was minef 

In pencil I had written on the margin 
way back then that I had received my 
license in January. My receiver was a 
24 detector and a '27 amplifier, f^y 
transmitter was a pair of '45s. Not 
mentioned was thai my antenna was a 
160 meter counterpoisa. 

I follow your writings with Interest. I 
have wondered about sperm damage. 
I have wondered about electric fields* 
However having made my living most 
of my years as an electronic techni- 
cian, exposed to very high magnetic 
fields from high-powered radar sites, I 



have not noticed lit effects myself, But 
of course this doesn't mean there 
arem any for others, or even for me. 

My ham radio interests &f& more in 
the area of construction and experi- 
menting. I work oflfy a weekly sched* 
ule with an old friend from grade 
school days via 20 meter CW. I am in- 
to packBi and other related fields like 
weather scan, etc. 

Thank you very much for your con- 
tinued efforts toward amaieur radio. 
Keep up the good work. 

Alfred L. Pedneau Sr. K5HKG, 
Alexandria LA Wayne, you are Cor- 
rect in the way that we need younger 
operators. I very setdom miss the kx;al 
club meeting on the first Monday of 
the month. Very seldom do we have 
any young people there. Most kids 
these days want to play on a computer 
or be given something for free. No one 
gave me a free Novice license in the 
summer of 1956. and no one has giv- 
en me anything tree since then. I be- 
lieve you have lo work for everything 
you get 

Keep up the good work, and keep 
calling a spade a spade. Nowadays 
someone has to, 

Af — Them you go biaming thB kkSs 
for not being interested in amateur /a- 
dflD Th&f's fike a rruinufaaurer blam- 
ing the pubtic for not buying his prod- 
ucts At, you have to seti any pn^uct or 
service and we hams are not seihng. 
Amateur radio today is an afmost un- 
known hobby Wh&n I fecture cofiege 
kfds on enteprenaunatism t ask for a 
show of hands of how many know 
what ham radio is. i get maybe three 
or four out of a couple hundred, and 
f've beer\ lecturing at Yate, Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute, Case Western, 
Boston University, Babson College, 
and a bunch of others. It isn't the kids' 
fault it's the ARRL's for doing its best 
to keep ham radio a secret hobby for 
retired old while men. as represented 
by the League's board which you and 
the rest of us have elected. And 
re-efected. And then re-eiected again . 
. . Wayne 

Del Harper KC4ZQP. Portland OR 
Wayne, 1 have been a subscnber to 73 
Amateur Radio Today for several 
years now ar>d 1 must admit that I find 
your atfilude towards life and crealfng 
accomplishments refreshing. I lotatty 
agree with you that people should 
lake responsltHlity for ttieir actions and 
quit blaming everyone and everything 
else for their current slate Ol being. I 
believe that I am the sum of all the 
choices that I have made during 
my life to date, and if I have a problem 
with where I am al or what I am doing, 
I am the one that I should talk to in 
order to fix it. I am proud of my accom- 
plishments as well as my screw-ups. 

Once again, thank you for all the 
enjoyable hours learning about Ihe 
hobby and the field of electronics that 
you have provided me since I have 
become a member of the amaieur 
radio a>mmunity. 



6 73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1 995 



You get more features for your dollar with \he 

REP-200 REPEATER 

A fully microprocessor-contrDlled repeater with autopatch 
and many versatile dtmf control features at less than you 
might pay for a bare-bones repeater or controller alone! 

Kit $1095; w&t only $1295! 




*Av3ABbiQ for the 143-174, 213-233, 
4a[M75, 902-928 MHz bands. 

• FCC tyf>e atxepted for commercial 
setvice ml 50 & 450 bamJSw 

• Six courtesy beep typet, indixling 
two pfeasam muiti-tone bursts. 

«Open Of ciose<i accees autof»teli, 
tol^-caEI restrict, auto-dtsconnect 

• Reverse Aytopatcti, two types. 

• DTMF CONTROL^ over 45 functions 
cm\ be controtted by 4-iiig(t dsirrf 
commancl, via radio or lelepfione 

• Omtnei can inhlbll autopatd^ or ra^ 



pester, enabte efthef open or closed 
aooess lor r^semm or autopatch, and 
onsble loi c^Rs, reverse patch, kef- 
chunk fitter, site aJa/m, aux rcvr. 

« Change cw speed artd tone^ beep 
delay, taif tomer. and courtesy beep 
type St any tiine by owner password 
protecled dtmf commands- 

• AuxiHary receiver input for control or 
cross linking repeaters. 

vColcM' coded LED status indicators. 





REP-200T Voice Message Repeater. As above, ©tcept 

includes DigitaJ Voice Recorder ARows message up to 20 sec. to be 
remotely recorded off the ajr and played back at user request by 
DTMF command, or as a periodcal vpic^ id. orttoth hn $114$, w&t only Si 395 

REP-200C Economy Repeater, uke rep-soo, except uses 

COR-6 ControHof (no DTMF control Of aLFtopatcJi). Features real-voice 
ID , Kit only $795, w&t $1095 

REP-200N Repeater, want to use your ACC controfler. etc.? No problerTi! 
Well make you a repeater with rt modules only. ..^„«..««... Ktt only $695, wAt $995 



XMTRS & RCVRS FOR REPEATERS, 
AUDIO & DIGITAL LINKS. TELEMETRY, ETC. 



Also available in rf-light enclosures, and with data modems. 

FM EXCITERS: ^Wconlmuous 

duty. TCXO & xtal oven opt ions, 
FCC type accepted for coml 
high band & uhl 

. TA51: 50^54, 143-174, 213-233 
MHz kit $109, wat $189, 

• TA451; 420-476 MHz 
..kit $109, w&t Si 89. 

- TA901 902-928 MHi, 
(0.5WoulXwat$219. 

VHF & UHF AMPLIFIERS. 

For ftn, ssb, atv Output levels from 

1 W to 1 00 W S e veral mode I s starti n g at $99 

FM RECEIVERS: 

- R144/R220 FM RECEJVERS for 145-174 
or 21 3-233 MHz Sensitive front end, 
O.lBuV, both crystal S ceramic (f filters 
plus helical re&onator front erKJ 
for exceptional seteciivity >lOOdB at 
±l2kH2 (best available anywhere!) 
Flutter-proof hysteresis squeldh; 

- ^^««- Kii S149. wAt $219 

- R451 FH RCVR, for 420^75 MHz 
Similar to above kit 3140 w&l $219. 

- R901 FM RCVR, for 902-92aMHz 
Tr<|>le'Converstoa. $169. w&\ $249. 

• R76 ECOWOMY FM RCVR fOf 26-30 50-54. 73^76, 
w/o hehcal res il selectivity > lOOdB at i12kHz 





143-174. 213-233 MHz, 
... Kits S129W&1 3219 




R76 MONITOR FM RCVR Kr: for 10M, 6M. 73 MHz. 2M, hi-bar>d. Of 220 
MHz. IF salectivrty 60ciB at ±12kHz Great for monitonng repeaters, 
amateur calbng frequencies, or packet radio frec^jencies, myd for isten^ 

fng to comrneraal twoway radio, police "ftre frequencies, or weather fonecasJs. 

Good staftBf kit, too; easy !o assembJe and align. ....„- -.Ktt only $59! 

• R137 WEATHER SATELLrTE RCVR for 137 WHx Special if Hllef^ ta-tored for 
yiifieban6fm Lowest cost re<xfver awadat^te ....kit only $53, w&t $143. 

• We ateo have pr eamps and receiving oonverters tor 137 MHz, and we carry the 
Weather Saieiifte Handixx:>^ Ijy Ralph Taggart 



• Buy at lovw. factory -direct net prices and savet 

• For complete info* call or write for free catalog. 

(Send S2 for overseas air m^iL} 

• Order by marl, fax. or phone is-ii am, i^ pMtA5t«m urmi 

' Min. S5 5SH charge toi^ um pouoct p\u% a^^n yr^t^H % Hisui^tic^ 

• Use VISA, IVIastercard, check, or UPS C.O.D. 



COR-3 REPEATER CONTROLLER. 

Features adjustable tail and time-out 
timers, solid-state relay, courtesy beep, 
and local speaker amplifier ..kit 349 

CWID. Diode programmable any I me m 
the f^eldn adjust able lone, speed. ar»d 



COR-4. Complete COR ai>d CWID all 
on one board CMOS fogtc for iow power 
consumptjOT). EPROM programmed; 
specify calJ kil S99, w&t $159 





COR-6. COR & 
Reat Voice ID 
on ona board 

Df9^tat icTscopds 

Lip to 20 seconds 

of your vojce 

Can record muttipfe id messagfts. Tail arwJ 

tfmeout timers counesy beep, solid-slate 

relay to key transimttef kil S99, w&t $149 

Versatile DVR-1 DIGITAL VOICE 
RECORDER Module As a voTce ID^er 
for rapeateri. records your voice :^^ ; 
the txjrltHn microphone or extemai . _ 
Just the ih<ng for foit hunt xmtr id! May 
also be used as a contest caller to play 
back one or more messages through your 
transmitter at the 0f ess of a switch Used 
as a ytdio notepad , st can record \he 
audio output of a receiver up to 20 sec 
of anything you might want to recalf later 

Play tsack as 
often as you 
like through a 
small ejdefnaJ 
speaker Ex- 
tensive mar^- 
uai tells how 
to use multiple 
messages snd 
adapt to many 
appiioatiOn<s, 
kit 359. wat $99 




TD-4 SELECTIVE CALLING Mod- 
ule. Versatile dtmf controller with 1 
latching output Mutes speaker until 

someone calls by send trig your 4-d4git tt 
code Or use it with 3 long tt zero digit to 
alert anyone in club Also may be used to 
control autopatch or other single device 

T0^2 DTMF DECODER/CONTROL' 
LER, 16 digits, programmable, toll -call 

restriclor. Cart turn S functions on/off, 
kit $99, wired !!( tested $149 

AP-3 AUTOPATCH. Use wJth TD-2 for 
repeater autopatch Reverse patch and 
phone line remote control are std. 
...kit $89, wired & tested $149 

AP^2 SIMPLEX AUTOPATCH Timing 
Board U»e with above for simplex oper- 
ation using a transceiver kit $39 

TD-3 SUBAUDIBLE TONE DE* 

CODER/ENCODER. Adjustable for 
any tor>e Etpeciatly for repcators, wilh 
remote control act ivate/de activate pro vi- 
sions kit $29 wired & tested $59 



DATA MODEMS 



IIO-202 FSK DATA MODULATOR & 

DE-202 FSK DEft^ODULATOR. Run UptO 

1200 baud digital signals through any fm 

transmitter & 

receiver 

Radio-itnk 

computers, 

te!emetry, 

etc kft ea $49, w&i ea S79 

9600 BAUD DIGITAL RF LINKS. 
Low-cost packet r»etwoiiong system, 
consJSt^rrg of MO -96 Modem and spectal 
vefsions ol our 144. 220, or 45C*flHz FM 
TransrnAlers and Receivers Interface 
ifirectty wth most TNC's Fast, dnxle- 
switdied PA'S output 1 5 or SOW CALL 






Low Cost GaAsFET 

PREAMPS 



LNG-(*) 

ONLY $59 

wiredAtes^ed 



FEATURES; 

• Very »ow noise: JdB vhf, O.edB uhf 

• High gain: 13-2008, deper>ds on freq 

• Wsde dyframfc range - resist overload 

• Stable: iow-^eedoacH dija^-gate FEI 

'Specify tiMikig mn^- ^6-30, 4^56, f37-r^, 
^52-irZ 2lth230, -MXMZO. S00-9S0tMU- 

LNW-D 

MINIATURE 

PREAMP 

ONLY $20kK$44 ^Mi^t^ 

m GaAs FEl" Preanp sirrotar to IMS, ejt- 
cept desij^ied for low cost & ftinaH size 
Only 5./S1/V x V5/B'L x 3/4"H. Easty 
moults in many racSos. 

*SpOC^ ivlDig rmige: 25-35, 35-5S, 35-90, 
SO-120, 120-S50, 15(^200.200-270, 400-500 JMR?. 

LNS-D 

IN-LINE 
PREAMP 

ONLY $89xn. $1 f 9wirtcttrt«i«i 

• GaAs FET Preamp vwth features sinrtitef 
to LNG series, except aiFtomaticalty 
switches out of line during transinR. 
Use with base or mobile transceivers up 
to 25W. Tower mounting brackets iricl 

*Timing rang^: f 20-175, 200-240. gt 400-500. 

HELICAL RESONATOR 
PREAMPS 

GaAs FET preamps 
with helical reson- 
ators reduce inter' 
mod & cross-band 
Interlerence in critical applk^ations. 
MO0£L HRQ-( ' ), S30 vhf, $110 uht 
*Specff/ tuning rstnger 142-150, iSO- 162^ lB2r 
i74, 213-233, 420-470. 



RECEIVING 
CONVERTERS 





-^<.*!^il3iE-3l«^ 




Low noise 
converters to 
receive viif 

and uhf 
barrds on a 
101^ receiver. 

• fnpu! ranges avail: 50-52, 136-138, 
144^146, 145-147, 146-148, 220-223, 
^2-224 MHz, 432-434, 435-437. 
435 5^37 S, and 439 25 {to charf 3). 

• Kit Fess case $4B, kit w/case & aNC 
jacks $T4, w&t in case $99. 



TRANSMITTING 
CONVERTERS 




XV2 lor vtrf and XV4 for ahf. Models to 
convert 10M ssb, cw, fm, etc to 2M, 220. 
222, 432, 435, and atv. 1W output 
Kit only $B9, PA'S up to 45W avaiabfe 



OutUndTtoar 



ronics, mc 

6S-D Moul Rd: Hilton NY 14468-9535 
Phone 716-392-9430 (fax 9420) 



QRX 



Number 3 on your Feedback card 



FCC May Change RFI Rules Vanity Calfsigns On The Way Romeo Zulu Whiskey 



The Federal Communications Comrnisston 
has proposed permitting manufacturers and 
suppliers of computers and computer periph- 
erals to market their equipment without having 
to apply for equipment certification. The re- 
quirement for FCC approval would be 
dropped under ET Docket 95-19. 

Currently, these devices must conform to 
FCC certification to ensure that they do 
not cause interference lo radio services, 
including the ham bands. This certification 
involves specific measurement data and 
a detailed product description to be submitted 
to the Commission's laboratory for review and 
approval. 

The process can take a month or more* 
The industry estimates that eliminating the 
wait could save the computer industry some 
250 million doilars per year. The FCC de- 
scribed the current regulations as burden- 
some to manufacturers and says this new 
procedure would aijgn FOG requirements 
for personal computers with those "used 
successfuiiy in other parts ot the world/' 

The streamlined new process would be 
based on the manufacturer's or supplier's 
Declaration of Conformity. TNX AHRL; 
Florida Skip. March, 1995. 



On February 1^ 1995, the FCC released 
the fuil text of the Report and Order covering 
how amateurs may obtam the callsigns 
of their choice. The system, outlined in 
last month's QflX (April, 1995, page 8), 
consisting of four "gates," is at the heart of 
the Commission's plan. The full text is sever- 
al pages long, and places emphasis on 
the fair and equitable distribution of vanity 
caiis. 

Priority is given to to close relatives of 
deceased amateurs to obtain their old signs, 
foiiowed by Extra Class, Advanced Class, and 
finally, to any licensee. As expected, the fee 
is set at $70 for ten years. Announcement of 
when you may apply for a vanity call will be 
made by public notice, so keep your eye on 
this space in the next coupie of months. The 
system should kick in as soon as the Form 
610-V is available. TNX W5Yi Roporl, Febru- 
ary IS, 1995. 



toQSY 



Bright Future 



[f youVe been procrastinating about up- 
grading your license class, this will make 
you really feel like a loser. Pictured on this 
page is r^'me-year-old Samantha Sanford 
AA3JS. Samantha passed her Novice ex- 
am at age efght on May 3, 1994, gave up 
TV for the summer and fall, then passed 
her Extra exam on December 21, 1994, 
just eight months iater! 

Samantha enjoys making new friends 
on CW and SSB, and she loves to rag- 
chew with all the locat club members of 
the South Hills Amateur Radio 
Club, of which she was voted Ju- 
nior Select Person for the 1995 
term. She Is often the net con- 
troJIer for the weekly 2 meter net. 
She has also been active in Field 
Day activities and has set up a 
hem radio exhibit at her elemen- 
tary schooL 

Samantha aspires toward the 
science or engineering disci- 
plines, sparked by her involve- 
ment in amateur radio. She offers 
the following advice for those 
thinking about taking an amateur 
radio exam: Study, study, study; 
practice, practice, practice; then 
have fun, fun, fun! TNX Robert 
Sanford A A3FI. 




After two years as our Senior/Technical Ed- 
itor, Charlie Warrington WA1RZW has seen 
the light, and is leaving the staff of 73 and Ra- 
dio Fun. That's because Charlie is moving up 
the frequency spectrum to write about light — 
he'll be documenting products as a Technical 
Writer for a leading manufacturer of re- 
flectance and laser devices. Thanks, CharHe, 
for your dedication and creative energy over 
the past couple of yearsl 

Mike Nugent WB8GLQ is taking over the 
position of Senior/Technical Editor here, 
and we all want to wish Nuge the very 
best. Nuge will draw on his previous experi- 
ence as Consulting Editor at 73 back in 1990 
and 199T He has also worked on the publica- 
tions Portable 100, PfCO, and pb: Your 
Powerbook Home Companion. Welcome 
aboard Nuge! 

More Space Hams 

Two more US astronauts have joined 
the ranks of amateur radio, according to 
the ARRL, as reported in the X-mltter. 
Both are expected to fly aboard the Space 
Shuttle Endeavour during an upcoming 
launch. 

Pilot William G. Gregory is now licensed 
as KC5MGA and Payload Commander 
Tamara G. Jernigan is now KC5MGF. Both 
sat for exams on January 19, and were is- 
sued callsigns on January 25, thanks to 
electronic filing with the FCC— a new fea- 
ture for the Commission. TNX Penn Wire- 
less Association's X-mitler; ARRL. 



Long Walk 



Photo H. Stefan Leca Y08HCW at ilie Empire State 
Building's Observatory in New York City. (Photo by 
George Patakl WB2AQC.) 




Photo B. Samantha L Sanford AA3JS (age 9), 



Romanian travelers Lavina Tatar and 
Stefan Leca Y08RCW are touring the 
world on foot! The pair left Romania 
on their ^Journey for Peace" 
August 17, 1992, and have walked 
across 24 countries so far wear- 
ing out 106 pairs of shoes. On 
route, Stefan (see photo) 
has used 16 different callsigns, in- 
cluding TA0RCW, JY0RCW, 
A45RCW, 7Z1RCW, 9K2RCW— 
well, you get the idea. 

So far they have been received 
by King Hussein of Jordan JY1, 
Sultan Qaboos of Oman A45AA, 
Prince Talal bin Abdulaziz of Saudi 
Arabia HZ1TA, Prince Titiphan of 
Thiland HS1LY, and many others. 
The total trip is expected to end in 
Romania, taking a total of three 
years. TNX George Pataki 
WB2AQC. 



8 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



BASIC STAMP MODULES* 

Stamp-sized modules run BASIC 




BASIC stamp I Module (BSMC) 

8 general-purpose I/O lines 
256-byte program space (100 rnstructions) 
4-MH2 clock (2400 baud serial etc.) 
$34, $54 with carrier board* 




CBnier boards provide battery cfips, prototyping 
area, programming connector, and reset button 

(BSI-iC carrier shown). 



niirimn 





BSZ-IC 




lASIC Stamp II Module (BSZ-iC) 

16 generaf-purpose I/O lines 

2048-byte program space (600 instructions) 

20-MHz clock (9600 baud serial, etc j 

$49, $69 with carrier board* 

These new BASFC Stamp modules are the latest in ^^Ij^^^^^^^HP'^ BASIC Stamp comf^lSiiRSi 

TheyVe perfect for numerous applications, from control- ^^^^^Bi^ ^^^S niodel trains to monitor- 
ing factory sensors. They have 8 or 16 I/O lines, w hich can be ""'"" used for a variety of digital and 
analog purposes. And like the original BASIC Stamp, these modules are programmed in BASIC. Our special 
"PBASIC language includes familiar instructions, such as GOTO, FOR„.NEXT, and IE.. THEN, as well as SBC 
insiructions for serial I/O, pulse measurement, and button debt>unce. 

The BASIC Stamp Programming Package contains everything you need to program Stamps using your PC, The 
package includes our editor software, programming cables, manuals, application notes, and free technical 
support. The package is available for $99; Stamps must be purchased separately. 



PIC16/17CXX DEVELOPMENT TOOLS 

Work ^th PICs in assembly language & C 




NETSURF OVER TO PARALUX 

We're now available on fntemet so you 
can contact us more easily than before! 

Send email to mfo^parafiaxincxom 

Ftp to ttp.paratlaxinc.com 

Browse at httpy/www^parallaxinc.com 



VA 



ClearView In-Circuit Emulators 

20-MHz in-circuit debugging for P)C16C5x/64/71/84A„ 
Set breakpoints, step through code, and modify registers. 
Friendly DOS and Windows software. 
$599 eacti! (separate units for "5x' and "xx" PICs) 



P/R^LM 



n 



PICt6Cxx Programmer 

Programmer for PIC16C5x/64/71/74/84/... 

Docs on disk; user-supplied cables* • $99 

Printed manuals; cables; power supply • $199 




3805 Atherton Road, #102 • Rocklin. CA 95765 • USA 

(916) 624-8333 • Fax: 624-8003 • BBS: 624-7101 • Internet: parallaxinc.com 

CkmVke^ v^ u tradmorli unci HA.SLC Siainp Sl thp FjratLu U^> utv tvyte^erexi lni«kfiiii4rfbi fii Pgrjlbx. Inc. * PLC !?> a t¥;gi<ita^ UsiUcfUsitk nf MKrochip TcviwiSsi^^ Inc. 

Fofunfsi ;mU potts* !?4il)fCiLl m tJwngP wuIum^ mUKt • Pnc*» nr^ \J.h pncc* oafyi fWICt^ m tJtbcr cuuntfi^ may vaiy. ■ Pftjgnurjmef 'HuhhYbt Purk" rBqyires* Wt WmJcirAs _V I ft* pnnijii;; doc». 



Number 4 on your Feedback card 



Builder's Guide to 

the Universe 

A beginner's guide to tiome-brewing. 

by Mike Bryce WB8VGE 



There's no quesiion about \u I like lo 
build elecironic kits. From the old 
HeaUikUs lo the bagi^jc of pun kits, 1 do 
like ihc smell ormaiteii solder Bui. there's 
more to ham radio ilian jiisi stuffing a PC 
board with pieces parts. I also enjoy design- 
ing my own gear from the ground floor. If 
nothing else, it's a learning experience, I 
may not know every Lhing there ts to know 
aUiul power MOSFETi^. but I sure can tell 
you how not to use them. Ah yes, 
the uiter shock of sceins biis of 
TO-220 case parts heading your 
way after the explosion. Great 
fun I 

To me, thai^s part of our past 
as radio hams, building and de- 
signing our own equipment. [ al- 
so enjoy the challenge of taking a 
project from jusi an idea to a , 
working unit. 



so 1 had ihem shot. That's why I keep my 
distance on overly compiex mechanical 
projects* 

Design your project around easy- to -find 

parts. Although the project may be a one- 
time shot, perhaps someone in the radio 
club you belong to wants to duplicate it. 
That suqilu.*:* warp phisma coil you picked 
up at the Dayton Hamvention two years ago 
may not be easy to find. If nothing else, you 



*To me^ that's part of our past as radio 

hamSy building and designing our 

own equipment. I also enjoy the 

challenge of taking a project from just 

an idea to a working unit. *' 



A Widget 

What's it goin^ to be? That's not as easy 
as it sininds. Tve built many a project and 
not had the slightest idea of what it's sup- 
posed to do. I don't have the talent to de- 
sign a new^ multiband PLL compuier-coo- 
trolted rig. So, 1 don't try. On ihc other 
hand. I love to pla\ v^ith a new iC that will 
do strange and wonderful things with just 
two capaciiors and a diixle. There's nothing 
quite like the feeling of conquest 1 get fR>m 
making a micro-powered op amp with a 
2,5-volt reference ditxle do its thing, 

1 try to avoid re-inventing the wheel. 
Let*s lace it, there are only so many ways 
to huikl an antenna tuner or a field-strength 
meter. However, you can improve on most 
designs you may run across or add in fca- 
tures you w ant. 

As a general rule 1 set m;my years ago, I 
tty not to get involved with complex me* 
chatiical projects, I tried to build a power 
amplifier for 2 meters using a single high- 
power tube. The amplifier required a vast 
array of pipes. pUInp^, seals, motors and 
other goodies. After months of w orking on 
this project, 1 tracked down most of the 
problem to a pair of bad seals. There's not 
much you can do with a pair of bad seals. 



may need a replacement pari For your ow^n 
use. Perhaps your little project may turn out 
to be really something special; then by all 
means you'll need a solid source for all the 
parts. Who knows, you may want to write 
up the project and send it to 73 magazine 
for publication. A project with a pans list 
naming several sources will always be 
ahead of the rest on the editor ^s table. Part 
sourcing and the ability lo duplicate ihe 
project should be high on your design list. 

Unless the project uses one or two ICs 
and a handful of parts, its PC board lime. 
Designing one isn't hard to do. and there 
are several computer programs made jusi 
for laying out PC boards. I 11 nd laying out 
PC boards to be a kind of brain health food 
forme. 

First Steps 

You need some sort of a plan for your 
project. Even God had a plan, and you need 
one too. it does not have to be fancy, just 
some thoughts on paper will do, I prefer to 
use the backs of crane safely report forms 
myself. They're just the right size for draft- 
ing out a circuit. 

Next, you'll need to specify how you're 
going to proceed with your project. I usual- 
ly Stan w iih a block diagram on paper* then 



expand ilie hhx:ks by adding hits and pieces 
of the circuit. We're still talking about just 
ideas, with no actual circuits being laid out. 
If I think 1 will need an NPN swiicliing unn- 
siston ri) draw out the basic idea and then 
add in the required support parts later. 

As the blocks become full of ideas, it's 

time to do .some mental circuit checking. 

Now is the time to stare into space while 

your wife yells at you for staying tew late at 

the last ham f est. All this lime, 

■ while youTe catching heH, you're 

working on the how and why of 

your project. When things quiet 

down, smile and say, "You're 

right dear," and go back for some 

more circuit design! 

After I've worked out most of 
the circuit in my head, it's time to 
^^ start building up the circuit in real 
lime. 1 use a prototype board for 
all my logic circuits. Pcrr-bourd is great 
stutt; but not for trying out a Jicw digital de- 
sign. It*s a hassle to solder in a part, test, re- 
move and then solder in a new pjut. If noth- 
ing else, the parts you end up removing usu- 
ally go to the trash can. The prototype board 
is the only way to go when it Ciimes to digi- 
tal or analog circuits* It's the fastest way to 
make changes without heating up the sol- 
dering iron. 

I don't use this method for testing oaf RF 
designs. Instead, 1 use a hunk of double-sid- 
ed PC board material. 1 solder in the pans in 
a skywire/iigly building fashion. After a few 
weeks of work, you can really go through 
the solder this way. 

Build in stages* If you're working on a 
small receiver, then st+irt with one .section. 
Design that section and test it before mov- 
ing on to the next. You mitihl want to start 
with the VFO, then the buffers and BFO, 
After these stages are working, design, test^ 
and refine the audio section and power sup- 
ply. 1 use a bench power supply to operate 
mv unit under desism. It's much lastcr that 
way, since I don^t need to rebuild this basic 
building block. 

As I w^ork my way through the project. 1 
usually fmd my thinking is 180 degrees out 
of phase* In other words, it don't work, it 



1 73 Amatour Radio Today • May, 1 995 



MF J HF/VHF SWR Analyzer 

. , , Read your antenna SWR from L8 to 170 MHz continuously . . . built-in 
10 digit LCD frequency counter. . . smooth vernier tuning • . . 

MFJ-259 handheld 




|«3 



Vnivenif SWR Analyzer^ 
lels you read your antenna 
SWR from 1 .8 to 1 70 MHz quickly and 
easily without any other equipment! 

MFJ's exclusive RF Resismnce 
Meter^^' lets you measure RF resistance 
up to 500 ohms at minimum SWR. 

Has built-in 10 digit LCD frequency 

iFJ-949E 30O W Tuner 



.n-f 




J-949E World's most popular 
299s aniennaiuner covers 1.8-30 

MH/. has \i^\\itd peaki 
-age Cross- Needle^SWR/ 
tmecer, 4: 1 balun for balanced tines 
fidl size 300 watt dummy loud. 
Versatile 8 position antenna switch 
you pre-time MFJ-949E into 
imy load to minimize QRM. 
Custom inductor switch was 
tftjlly engineered to withstand 
eme voltages and currents. 
Cabinet is chemically etched to 
J's btmd ttiueh haked-on painL 

VHF/HF Packet TNCs 




1 270C 

VIFJ- 1270C super TAFR TNG 
ie has a world wide reputation as 
most reiiahle packet TNC in the 
id " many work 24 hours a day for 
rs without a single failurel 
Fully TAPR TNC-2 compatible, 
Fmid HI' op e rati on, /^-^e AC power 
ply, new enchanced mailbox 
andable 10 5 1 2K with auto/reverse 
1 forwarding, WeFAX mode lets 
prim weather maps, optional 
»-in 2400/9600 baud modems, 
:S interface. MFJ Host mode. 

MFJ TNC/Mic SwHch 




Switch between your TNC or 
rophone by pushing a button! 
lust plug pre-wired cables mio 
r rig's mic connector and TNC. 
Plug-in jumpers let you use nearly 
rig with H pin mic connector 
■J4272B, S34.95 /MFJ/TAPR TNC2 
ies;MF.l-l272BX/PK-232; 
J-1272iiY\7KAM VHF/KPC3; 
J-1272BYH/KAM HI^ Port; 
J-1272BZ/PK-88, S39.95 each, 
8 pm RJ45 ttifhlidnr pf tone jack ne- 
r£ B With M in model number afmve. 

'egeif erofrife RCVR KH 

I StOOK 
If^kit 

1-8 1 Of) W 

V^\%ired Build this re^enera- 

shortwave receiver kit and listen 10 

rtwave signals from all over the 
Id with jusi a 10 foot wire antenna. 
Has RF stage, vernier reduction 
e, smooth regeneration, five biinds. 





•«■•*« 



counter and smooth vernier tuning. 

Yqu gci four instruments in one 
10-digit frequency counter . . . RF 
signal generator. . . SWR Analy/er' 
RF Resistance Meter^ 

Meiisure antenna resonant 
frequencies and 2-1 SWR bandwidths. 
Adjust mobile anlennas, antenna tuners 
and matching networks in seconds, 

Mrj-1278B Miilti-Mede Data Cotilrollef 

Use this MFJ-P78B -^ 
MFJ- 127BB, your t^^^vs * Q 
transceiver and 

computer to transmit and receive digital communicaiionsi You1l 
discover a whole new world of ham radio and communicate in ways 
you never knew existed on our ham hands. 

The world class MFJ4278B Muhi-Mode and MuIfiCom"* 
software is packed with features no other multi-mode gives you. 

You gel 10 digital modes , . . Packet, AMTOR. FACTOR (at no 
extra cost), RTTY, ASCn, Mavtex, Color SSTV, 16 Gray Level FAX, 
CW and Memory Keyer plus an enchanced 32K Mailbox. 

You'll have fun joining waildwkit packer networks and exchanging 
c^/or5iS7V pictures with your buddies uround the world. You'll marvel 
iii full color FAX news photos as ihcy come to life on your screen. 
You'll see weather changes on highy detailed weather mat?s in all 16 
gray levels. You'll eavesdrop on late breaking news as it happens on 
RTT}'. You 11 enjoy error free HF QSOs on FACTOR and AMTOR and 
receiving packet mail in an enchanced 32 K mailbox, Wani to copy 
some C\V? Just watch vour screen. 

MFJ- 1289, $59.95rMultiCom'^ software and cables. 



Measure RF resistance^ inductance, 

capacitance, resonant frequency of tuned 
circuits, transmission tine velocity factor 
/impedance/ loss. Test RF chokes,baluns. 

MFJ-209, $109.95, same as MFJ- 
259 less frequency counter and RF 
Resistance Meter 

Heefree MFJ catalog for complete 
line of MFJ SWR Analyzers™ 

S uper Hi'Q loop Antenna 

MP)- am 



MFJ haHwawe verficaf Antenna 

6 hands: M 20, 15, 10, 6,2 Meters ...No rcuMak or gmimd needed! 

Operate 6 bands -40, 20. 15. 10, 6 mfm7% \ 

and 2 Meters -with this M F J- 1 796 « % 99f^^ ? 

ground independent hatfwave verttcaf 
antenna! No radials or ground ever needed] 

It's only 12 feet high and has a tiny 24 inch 
footprint) Ntau can mount it anywhere from ground 
level to the top of a tower - on apartments, condos^ [W-^^h-- 

small lots, even on motorhomes. Perfect for 
vacations, field day, DX- pedition, camping. 

Frequency selection is fully automatic -- all you do 
fs transmit. Its low angle of radiation really reachs out 
and brings in DX. Omni-directional. 1500 watts PER 

Efficient end loading, no lossy traps. Entire length 
is always radiating: Full size halfwave on 2 and 6 
Meters. High power air-wound choke balun 
eliminates feedline radiation. Adjusting one band has 
minimum effect on other bands. Add S20 s/h. 

Easy to assemble — you'll have it on the air in an afternoon. 




MFJ's wofff if iamaos 3 KW Vewwi Tuner V 

Here's why the MFJ- MFJ-9S9C ^ 
989C is the fmest 3 KW *349" 
antenna tuner money can buy . . , 

Two massive 250 pf 
Iransmitling variable capacitors cm 
handle amps of RF current and , 

6000 RF volts, l.ogging scales. ^ ~W 

Precision ball bearing roller inductor, three digit turns counter and 
spinner knob give you exact inductance control for minimum SWR. 

Lighted pf fjJt/average Cross-Needle S WR/Waimieicr has 200/2000 
watt ranges. Super heavy duty currem balun has two giant 2'/2 inch 
powder iron toroid cores wound with Teflon^ wire. 

Six position ceramic antenna swilch has extra large contacts. Flip 
standi dummy load, one year unconditional guarantee, aluminum cab- 
inet, tough haked-on paint, locking compound on nuts/lx>Us. handles 
3 KVV PER I07itx4yixl5 in. Meter lamp needs 12 volts. Add S13 s/h. 

MFJ No Matter What Guarantee 

MFJ\s famous one year No Matter What ancondiliomil 
guarantee means we will repair or replace (at our option) your 
MFJ product sold in this ad rr> matter what for a full 



year^ 




Tiny 36 inch 
diameter high 
eflicicncy loop 
antenna covers 10-30 
MHz continuously 
with low SWR- Handles 1 50 watts. 

Ideal for home installations where 
space is limited" apartments, condos, 
small lots. Take on trips* 

All welded construction. 

Remote control has At^touwtic 
Band Selection'''. Cross-Needle SWRi 
Walt meter. No control citble needed. 
Use buiiLT ics or 1 10 VAC. Add$20 s/h. 

No ground or tuner needed. 

MFJ-I78a,$269.**5, like MFJ- 
1786 but remote control has only 
slow/fast tune buttons. 

Oumi Bond Mobile Ant, 

Mobile Antenna for M4/44i) MHz 
.MFJ dual 
band mugnei ^'f,i'i7^ 
mount mobile *^ 
antenna for 144/440 MHz 
has 19 inch stainless steel 
mdiaror. low SWR. For 
mobile rigs with SO-239 
UHF connector ami hnndie- talkies 
with inrhided BNC adapter. 

S/8 Wove Mobile Ant. 

Maximum MFJ- 1 72S/B 
Gain " 5/8 «24» 

Wave 2 Meter 

magnet m aunt mobi I e an te n - * 
na has stainless steel radia- 
tor, l2ftcoax, low SWR. 
UHF mobile {MFJ- 1 728| or 
BNC handie-ialkie 
(MFJ* 1 728B) connector. 

5/8 Wove Ground Plone 

$19.95 gets MFJ- 1750 
you a 2 Meter 5/8 *!•" 
wave ground plane itonic 
station antenna! You get 
the highest gain of any 
single element antenna, 
shunt fed matching* S 

ceramic insulators. 
MFJ-1752, $19.95, for 
220 MHi, 



^ 




Free MFJ Catalog 

Wriie or call... m^647-lSm ^ 



Nearest Dtaler/Orders; H(H>-647-lS00 
Technical Help: S0O-647.TFXH (S324) 
' I ifiar untondixiQml guaranli?? ' 30 day mtwev back 
guaramee (kss s/h) cm ordei^ fmm MFJ • Frte catakig 

IVIFJ EIVTERPRISES, INC 

Bos 494, Miss. Slate. MS 39762 
(601 ) 323-5869; R-4:3(^ CST, Mon-Fri. 
I AX: (601)323-6551; Add % s/h 

MFJ y • . making qtiality affordahle 




CIRCLE B& ON PEADEn SERVICE CARD 



H 



never seems to make a bit of sense lo 
me why a circuit would work pertecily 
on pupcr. only to do ihe damnedest things 
in real life. This brings up an inipt>ttani 
siep in buildjng your o\\ n gear — the paper 
woric. 

Keep Track of Your Paper Work 

lt*s true? You're rcLilly not done with any 
project until the paper work is finished. 1 
have a hard lime with this myself. ^^^_ 
Once the project starts taking 
form, it's so easy to lose track of 
the changes made to it, 1 end up 
with several dozen versions of the 
project, having no idea what ver- 
sion worked and what one pro- 
duced smoke. I've tiow gotten in- ^^^^ 
lo the habit of writing down the 
dale and version number someplace on the 
schemaiic. This way, I have some idea of 
what I've been working on, 

I start with a large sheet of drawing pa- 
per 1 build the circuit based on the luitline 
and block diagrams on my cheat sheets. As 
I assemble the circuit, I lest and confirm its 
operation, then I tninsrer the details onto 
this sheet. 



After I have the circuit working oA &e 
prototype board. I tear it alt down and start 
lo rebuild the circuit once more, Bui this 
itme I use the schemaiic I created during 
the testing phase. It goes without sajing, I 
usually screw up somewhere along the way 
and need lo make changes on the schemat- 
ic. Of course, changing the problem on pa- 
per still requires changing the circuit on the 
prototype board as well, 

^7 get madder than a KUngon in 
room full of Trihbles when I see 
PC board with a zillion wires 
emerging from it. 



9f 



If all goes as pianned. I ha\ c a working 
project Oil my hands, but I m not done yet 
There are still a few more steps required 
before I move on to mv next idea. As 1 
mentioned earlier, a PC board is the only 
way to build today. So, if I consider the 
project worthy of a hoard. I then start to lay 
out the ha!>ic design of the circuit* again on 
paper. 



I usuall) have some idea of what and 

how many types of inputs and outputs Ihe 

project wilt require. A keyer, for example, 

will need at lea^st five wires to and from the 

PC board. My designs differ from most of 

the designs you may be used lo^ as [like to 

employ some sort of PC terminal block of j, 

header I gel madder than a Klingon in a 

room full of Tribbles when 1 see a PC board 

with a zillion wires emerging from it» A 

^^^^^^ terminal block or header makes 

the board easy lo install, use, and 
ft . ^ 

** repair. 

Q Perhaps the best thing to hap- 

pen to PC btnird layout has been 
the computer. No more cui-and* 
paste with tape and donuts on 

^_^^^^ plastic. Now, a computer will al- 
low you to lay oui a circuii and 



move one or more traces or pads in sec- 
ond!>. There are PC layout programs for 
IX)S, Windows and the Macintosh. How to 
use these programs is a bit more than I want 
to gel into right now, but most are easy to 
learn and use. 

After you have your PC board laid out, 
it's time to make a trip to the local copy or 
graphii' arts shop. Here, I have n larger than 




When you call or write to our advertisers^ let them know you saw their ad in 73 Magazine! 



f 



TOLL 



I 



I 



PRICiNG AND 
ORDERS ONLY 






$20 
OFF 




FT-990 All -Band HF Transceiver 



eiVer 



FT'5100, FT'5200 
gm/440MHZ Mobiles 



FRG-100 SHORTWAVE RECEIVER 



CALL FOR ALL YAESU RADIOS & ACCESSORIES 



FT'530 

2rn/440MHz 

Handheld 



NEW EQUIPMENT PRICING AND ORDERS 1-800-666-0908 OUT OF STATE 
TECHNICAL, USED GEAR, INFO 203-666-6227 24HR FAX 203-667-3561 



Hours 

M-F10-6, 
SAT. 1 0-4 



LENTINI COMMUNICATtONS INC 



21 GARFtELD STREET. NEWfNGTON, CT 06111 






or^ 



C.O.D.s Same Day 
Shipping 



CJRCLS 234 ON DEADER SERVICE CARD 



12 73 AmatBur Radio Today • May, 1 995 




Inlormation at your Ongeriips, Even^tKing you nmA to know about operating the ntw 
TH79A(D) ?h\ dual-knder (]44MHz/440MH2) can he \'!ewed in its unique dot-rrtatm LCD 
with alphanumeric dispky, No need for tlic maxiual^ In addition to this innovative guide 
funcLion. die TH*7?A(D) sports a us^r-frieiidlY menu sj-stem. providing easy access m the 
manv pftwerfui feanires of ihis slim-lint handheld transceiver. Such as 82 non-volatile 
memorv' channels with ID, DISS and page funciioBs, and a DTMF memoij* function 
tor autodial operation. Fulkrossband duplex operation k available, as k the abiliiy to 
receive two frequencies on the same band (WF+VHF or UHF+UHF) simukaneously^ 
And thanks lo the FET power module, long hour? of operation are possible on one charge, 
Wi\h the TH-79A(D), tra.nscetvcr technology- enters the 21st cenruij^. 



V Dpprox. Gutpul (144MHz), 2W approx. output (MOMHi) fr( 

jMOS FFT power module nnd supplietl 6V battery; SW approx. out[ 

ijsing oplionat PB 34 1 Oot-mDlrix LCD with menu/guide systen 

82 non-vobttle memory thonnels with ID 

IDTMF keypad wITh memory function 

DISS (Duo! Tone Squekh System) wilh page 

Built-in CTCSS tone encoder/decoder I Automofic bond thonge 

f oweron cot! sign display I Aylo repeater offeet (VHF) 

Wide-rorqe flexible antennD ■ Input overvoitage warning 

^posttion oi^pul power contr o 

'jAuto power- off ond faottery save function 1 Tirne-out timer 

iMemory chroitiel iock-oiil (stan mode) 

Cross bond repeoter Function i Page onswer-bodc function 

Channel dispioy fundion I Widtbomi receivef coveroge, indud 

rAM Twin on the mmA bond* ■ Qof»e fffltdion 

nxtfiabfe for MARS/CAP use" 






95ARD-1140 



KENWOOD COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION 

AUAflUH RADIO PRODUCTS GROUP 
PO Wok 22r*ti. 2201 E. DofnirigLiez St. Ltfig BsafM. Caitofna 9Ge01-S7'i5 

KENWOOD ELECTRONICS CANADA INC. 






one-to-cine paper copy made of the artwork. 
A gotxl quality copy machine ihat will do 
enlarging w ill work too. I have the original 
enlarged as big as I can to tit the paper. 
Many times I use the "B" si/.e paper, or 1 1 
X 17 inches. If 1 have a double'Sided board, 
I make the top side of the board in red and 
the btntoni in black. Again, any good copy 
center or t!raphic ans shop should be able to 
do this for % ou ai a fair price, 

\\'ith the enlarged PC board traces at 
hand, it's time lo get down and dirty. You^H 
need a highlighter pen or tuii and a 
night of reruns on TV. The object is to ~ 
iollow each and e\'er\^ trace vou made 
against your schematic. Check off the 
components on the schematic as you 
follow the circuit on the paper. Use the 
highiigluer to mark sections of the PC 
board you've checked, and those on 
the schematic as well ■** 

After you have made your correc- 
tions, it's time to bum a board. Again, that's 
a bit more than I want to go into right now, 
but enough to say it's not at all hiird to do. 
However, Tve gotten ia/y in my old age* 
and now send the artwork out for a pruto* 
type or two to be made. I don*t like to iron 
and the resist pens are a pain in the butt. 
Luck> for us, there are several companies 
that specialize in making PC b<jard proto- 



types. FAR Circuits (18N640 Fietd Court, 
Dundee, (L 601 [K) will do prototypes at a 
fair price. Write to find out the finer details- 
The price will depend on the size, 
amount of extras like silk-screenine and 
solder mask, and if the board will be dou- 
ble-sided with plated-ihrough lioles. A re- 
cent project set me back $300 for two dou* 
hle-sided boards with plated-rhrough holes. 
This was done by a company that makes 
large runs of PC boards. They did the work 
for me but 1 had to pay for it. Had I gone 



^*Why who knows^ I may want to 

build your version of a time 

continuum projector for Field Day, 

and III need the plans F^ 



ahead with a run of the same boards, the 
cost would have been about S8 each in lots 
of 100. Even in short runs of 25-50 boards. 
the price is quite reasonable, h's now possi- 
ble to have a PC board made for a club pro- 
ject without the club*s accountant having 
the bis one. 

No matter what route you take, the first 
board more than likely will have a bug or 



two. The problem is, you'll never know \i 
unless you build the project on your new 
PC board! Now this is what 1 call fun I No 
matter how many hours I spend checking 
the paper layout of the PC board, I usually 
find something screwy with the final pro- 
ject* li may be a case of having a resistor 
placed too close to an IC or n terminal 
block hittine a retrulator. Or. I've even been 
known to forget a VCC run to a chip or 
two. Again, make the necessary correction 
and have a second board burned. And, 
aiiain, check the PC board out bv build- 

"ha- K 

■ ing the circuit once more. This time 
around, everything should be as good 
as il's iioins to set. 

The final part of the pixvjcct is writ- 
ing up some sort of instructions for the 
project. Do you really think you'll re- 
member what that Jumper block does 

■ three years from now? Gather all the 
paper work from the original block dia- 
grams to the finaJ PC board layout and fde 
them away. 

While this does seem to be a lot of work 
for a simple project, it's well u unh the time 
and effort. The ability to reproduce the pro- 
ject is a must for most editors. Why who 
knou s, 1 ma> want to build your version of 
a time continuum projector for Field Day. 
and ril need the plans! 



To sell your products in 73 Amateur Radio Today 

call Dan Harper at 1-800-274-7373. 



CB-TO-10 METERS 



We specialize in CB radio modification 
plans and hardware. Frequency and FM 
conversion kits, repair books, plans, high- 
performance accessories. Thousands of 
satisfied customers since 1976J Catalog $3. 



CBC INTERNATIONAL 

LOU FRANKLIN K6NH Owner 
Pu BOXaibOOX PHOENiX AZ 8504b 




Whereas the Loop? 

^vhipim u tHk\ iinJ i\h- utiEp tn tlk' vLJndt^u- 

^vjlh it uni1crfli:iil, On)) llw TV ii^ ills? iifSil 

tincido t^^ri] mf ^^, A liufii wlih un Oriinic.iKip 

JLJvl Jyingimi his nHtl''W'Li^isLll^lll;,! k) CSify 

bvdy. ifn I pill 1M1L' LiinlLirJM^ \Uii SL»pv'rB(>u,t 

^hcn £i[] ihc ihJiiihKifji yv^jfi; bu?iv,, ItU it vtMh soax, Now Vm j;cLlir>^ 

iiuuin4iJi1tra \li.AiUS,SS^ff 

Mm %p} Mim Sl^i 7jS4trKOm S99 IfiOm SL59 

Antennas West ortr«r l^''S41%%V^ 



CIRCLE 363 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



/E 



OITJU M!IlI(Dh'C4LL SIOSS 

ONJ.rNE" t.i.S.INTERNATiQ>JAI.C:AiL PIRI=:rTORY 



^ 



HamcaJi online service gives you access to 
over a million hams via your computer & 
modem Updated eaeh month! Omv $29.95 
per year. Unlimited use - 24 hours a day - 
you pay for the phone call 

a(M):2S2 5628 ffL^f ^^^J-, ^^^ T^CLi: 894^9141 

Rndv 4, Box leao ^ Mineral. Vlrglnf* 291 IT 
Intemat: infb^Mch.c^in 



CIRCLE 7 ON flEADER SERVICE CARD 



Digicom > 64 Modern 

Low Co«t Packet for th« CoinniDdora 




Fe«titf»s: Software-based PACKET thai maNes your 
compuief emulate a TNC. Modem connects from 
casseiie pott to RIG. Watchdop timer & we6 relay 
PTT standard. Power derived from Com put er. Uses 
crystal controlted 7910 chip, VHP and HP, Lock, TX & 
RX LEDs. Free copy of Version £.03 software 
Included, 

Complete Kit Only $49.95 

Assembled & Tested $69.95 

CA R&sid&nts^dd ?75% ssl&s tax. S&H: $5.00 

(kJsuFfid}, Foreign orders add 20%. Formers info 

Of price itst; send fegai size SASE (S5e) to: 





AM Engineiring j^ 

2521 W. LaPafma HK * Anaheim. CA 93001 - ?14 95M114 



Dayton Booths 332-333 



Dayton Booths 332-333 



BayCom 
Modem 

Low Cost Packet 
for PC / ClonM 




Fealure^i Software ba$ed PACKET thai makes your 
computer erniilaie a TNC. Modem conriects from 
serial port lo RlG, Walchdog timer & reed relay PTT 
standard. Operates I rem 1 2vbC# tOOma, wal I power 
suppjy included Uses crystal controlled 7910 chip, 
VHP and HF. Lock &. TX LEO indicators. Free copy of 
Version 1.40 English software Included. 

Kit, ..,..,, .$59.95 Enclosure $10 

Assembled & Testad Board $79,95 

Assembled Bk Tttftlad in Box .,..,.. $89.95 
CA ResiderrW add 7,75% sailes lax. SSH: $5.00 
(insured}. Foretgn orders add 20%. For. more inio 
Of pfke Usl; send logai stze SASE (550} to: 

A&A ingiMBfittg 

2S2\ W. La Pa I m^ tK * Artah^im, CA ^2^^ • 714-t52 2114 J 






Chassis Kits 

cabinet Kits 

Assecnbl^ Cablrvets 

Slope Bo^ KHs 

UHF& VHP Antenna 
Power Divider Kits 



RackSf>&lvBS 

Radc Equipfnent Calwiels 

Antenna Grounding Kits 

Tower Mount&d 6o)( Kits 
Dipoie Hangers 
Other enclosures 



Small sh99ts Aluminum and Brass 

Ctiarles Byers K3IWK 

5t20 Harmony Grove Road, Dover, PA 17316 

PhOTe 717-292^901 

PttMWn ePM and 9:30PM E^. Evtt* 
'DifitributorshEp Available" 



ORCLE 222 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



14 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



THE DLTIMATE NOISE/INTERf ERENCE REDUCTION AND FILTER UNIT 



__^^^^^^^^^^^^^^t_*t_ 


^^^^^^■^^^^^^^ 


■■ .HI 


L-nisra 




^ m 


■ 


1100 *1Vq 


,150(nv 


*«(« 


4 


* 









^^k 


l^^^^^B 


W 


miQ^ 


^^^ 34(1 



HOItH 



At long lasu the most advanced noise reduction/filter unit 
is now available from IPS. DUAL DSP chips arc used in the 
NIR-12 to provide simnftangn^ i^; bandwidth filler^ noise 
reduction (2 types) and tone removal. Both Spectral 
SubtiacUoD (NIFf^ and Dynamic Peaking noise reduction 
methods are included to provide reduction of IMPULSE 
noises as well as atmospheric white noise. An AUTOMATIC 
NIK® mode is included to set the noise reduction at the 
optimum point, based upon the measured Signal-To-Noise 
ratio of ihe recei ved signal . A spectra] notch filter provides 
cancellation of multiple heterodynes finommne-ups, adjacent 
channel terriers, CW, RTTY, or simular signals without 
interfering with voice signals. The notch filter operates in 
5 milliseconds or less. The super-selective FIR filters are 
continuously variable in both bandwidth and center 
frequency. Bandwidth is adjustable between 50 tiz and 
3200 Hz. The user-friendly front panel gets you operating 
on the air in the shortest possible time. An internal access 
to the dual DSPs is provided via RS-232 for experimenters* 

Otfi er fme IPS Am^eur Rad lo prod ucts include : NIR- 1 Noise & In tcrference 
Reducer; NRF-? GeneraL Ptirpose Noise Reducer & Filter Unit; NTR-I 
Wideband Noise and Tone Remover; SSTV-1 DSP Filter for SSTV[ NF-60 
DSP Spectral Notch Filter. 1 15VAC/12VDC adapter available 

If you want the best, get JP5. 

JPS Communications. Inc. 

'Rrst Bnd Fin^t in DSP Noise Reduction' 




NIR-12 

With Dual DSP 



""•« "OSE AND ,„a^ 



f REDUCER 



PEwc 



NtR 



AUTO 




OUAIOSP 



Features 

• Superior Audio Noise Reduction 

- Atmospheric White Noise 
' Automobile Ignition Noise 

- Power Line Noise 

- Static 

- Computer/TV Interference 

- Digs Out Weak Ditficult-to-read Signals 

- Greatly Reduces Listener Fatigoe 

♦ Both Spectrat Subtraction and Dynamic Peaking 
Noise Reduction 

* Manual and AUTOMATIC NIR® Noise Reduction 
Control 

♦ Operates on Audio From Any Radio 

• Dual DSP Accessible Via RS-232 

* All Modes Usable Simuftaneously 

* Notch Filter Removes All Tones from Voice and 
Operates in <B msec 

♦ Super FIR Filters provide: 

- Fully Adjustable Bandwidth. Center Frequency 

- "Real Time" Operation 

- Very Steep Skirt Selectivity 

- Greater than 60dB Ultimate Rejection 

- Linear Phase; Minimum Passband Ripple 

- Usable as Bandpass. Highpass or Lowpass 



TOLL FREE ORDER LINE: 800-533-3819 



We accept MC, VISA, Money Order, or Check ($US) 

P.O. Box 97757, Raleigh. NC 27624 
FAX: (91 9)790-1 456 Technical Info; (91 9)790-1 046 
CompuServe: 71 673. 1 254 Internet: jpsgnando fwt 

Contact us for a ctealer near you. 






CIRCLE 2a5 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 5 of! your Fee^fback card 



Wart Remover 

Build this easy module to eliminate unsightly wall 

parasites from your shack. 



by Michael Bryce WB8VGE 



Most of them arc sniati. blacK and ugly. 
Every ham I know of has do/ens of 
them sucking up juice, even when they're 
doing no work ax ulf Tlicv hide in the moM 
oui-of-ihe-wav pbccs, yei they're aJways in 
the way. They can suck the life right otn of 
your HKindhy bialtery hunks if you>e on in- 
verter power. To top iliingK off, they're ex- 
pensive to buy if you need one. Whal are 
they? They're wall wart.H — -.smaH power sup- 
plies you plug inio the wall ouiieLs. 

Look around your shack. How many 
wall warts do you have plugged in? Five, 
10. or even more? They keep my invcner 
on all the time and. just like parasites, ihcy 
suck p*>wer from ihe inverter even though 
the device they* re suppose lo be running is 
turned off. 

Every time my wife v^ants to use an out* 
let, a wall wan must be removed firsi. Of 
course, she always jiianages lo gel the one 
attached to the backup liglning system. Aficr 
replacing the batteries for lliul light for the 
last lime. 1 came up with the "Wart 
Remover." This sinipie project will allow 
you to remove jiLst about all the wall wans 
from your shack. You clju build vour own 
Wan Remover for aKiui S40 or so. Ifs easy 
to build and requires no special lest gear to 
adjust. 

The basic modufe wilt replace up lo four 
wall warts, and you can add on a second 
module if you warn to remoxe mone. If you 
only have three or less uirc you kidding?), 
you need only build the circuit for your 
needs. The Wan Remover will replace up to 
3 nmps worth of wall wiins. An extended PC 
board will hold up to eight regulators, and 
you CLin piggyback nnt>iJicr extended board 
for a total of 16 regulatvjfsi* 

A Closer Look at Wall Warts 

Most wall wan?* are nothing more than a 
^miUl transformer, diodci*, and a filter capac- 
itor. In fact, if you rip one apan. you'll find 
pertiijps one diode, may be two. and a smiilt 
filter capacitor. They have no active devices 
inside, such as regulators or transistors. 
They're sealed up in plastic, making repair 
almost impossible. WJien they go bad, you 
gel a new one- With guts like this, most wall 
wans hiwe very bad voltage regulation and 



leave plenty of ripple on the DC they do 
supply. Some wall warts supply only low 
voltage AC to their loads. 

Looking around my shack, Ihc wall warts 
I have come in several different flavors. 
They're either in 6- volt DC or 9 volt DC, 
with some AC-only ones thrown in for good 
mea.surc. I use my main l2-volt bsiilcry bank 
for all my 12-volt needs, thus 1 have no 12* 
volt wall warts. 

The Wart Remover 
It's simplicity itself. I wanted a project 



that everyone could build. So, usmg off-the- 
shelf parts that are easy to find was my first 
goLil. \l also had to be easy to adjust. In keep- 
ing with ham radio tradition, it had to be 
cheap, too. 

What 1 came up with is a stock LM317 
regulator circuit. The circuit is a standard 
conslaiil voltage type. I figured it would be 
easier on everyone to go constant voltage in- 
stead of constant current because of the zil- 
lions of different loads wall \\:inN nperatc. 

A PC boiird is used to speed up ihe pro- 
ject. In fact, there are twi» PC boards. The 



R20 
1 BK' 



%^ 



*— * 



C5 



/"7~T 



^ 



OS 



LM317T 



Input from 
recilfler board 



X 




IN Out 

Ad| 



04 
.1 



CI 
470 MF 



t3t3 



Jr 



240 






D1 



To secoTKl 

ragu^lDr 

board 




*0«iput 
to kiid 



/"TT 




^7W 



C9 
4.7t# 



Wat BefTKrwer regytaior schemsllc 
Only one o^ lour regulators shown 



\s^ 



i 



AC 



47QQniF 

-^f 



ToJtarJS: 



,/rW 



JT 



Figure I. Wan Remover schematic diasrom. 



1 6 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



Feedback 



In our continuing effort to present the 
best m amateur radio features and 
columns, we recognize the need to go 
directly to the source— you. the reader. 
Artides and columns are assigned feed- 
back numbers, which appear on each 
article/column and are atso listed here. 
Please rate each feature or column as 
'^Greal," -^OK," or ^No Way." Mail your 
responses to: 73 Magazine Feedback. 
70 Route 202N. Peterborough, New 
Hampshire 03458. 

1 Never Say Die 

2 Letters 

3 QRX 

4 Builder's Guide to tfie Universe 

5 Wart Remover 

6 Review: Trident TR - 1 200 
Wide-Range Monitor Scanner 

7 Review: Oak Hills Explorer Kit 

8 6 Meters— The In-Between Band 

9 Review: Alfnco DR-M06 

10 Review: Comet HA4S 

11 A Foolproof Power Controller 

12 K4SYULoop Antenna 

13 Carr's Comer 

14 Homing In 

15 Ham Help 

16 Hamsats 

1 7 Packet & Computers 
1 S Above and Beyond 

19 ATV 

20 Updates 

21 QRP 

22 RTTY Loop 

23 Ask Kaboom 

24 Hams with Class 

25 Special Events 

26 New Products 

27 Barter 'n' Buy 

28 Propagation 



HUGE 



100 PAGE 
CATALOG 



Communications Recetvers 

Portable Recervers 

Scanners 

Amateur HF Transceivers 

VHF'UHF Transceivers 

HTs and Mobiles 

Amateur and SWL Antennas 

Accessories and Parts 

RTTY and FAX Equipment 

Books and Manuals 

This catalog includes prices! 

Send 

SI to 



Universal Radio 

6830 Americana Pkwy. 73 
Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 

Ta I. 614 866-4267 



COLOR SLOW SCAN TV 

for the 
SOUND BUSTER 








•tmtd iivi rTcerveSiow Scjin TV with you/ Sound Bi:«v1*r 
Sflund cajd In FULL COLOR 1!r titf in-d fun to ut*l 
Send your own pictures md R#ctiva m RotHt t,iaL14,JI B&W^ 
Robot ^^71 COLOR and Scottf ^^2m COLOft 



RHtttiCH PC^ VGA UO > 4a0 - 

WSt CCiorv iBd Sisuiiil BU^tf 

cofnpatUtte sound < 






ONLY $99.95 



Wmoim 



AUaO ANALT21A 




Harlan Technologies 

5931 Alma Dr. - Rocklord, Illinois 31108 



CKtCLE 1ST ON READEH SERVICE CARD 



Direct Digital Synthesizer Kits 

DDS'J. S149 kit. S199 assembled. 

•2 Hz to 12 MHz. 2 H? steps. Sine & HL. 

• Dip switch or parallel bus controlled. 

• 3"'x4" PWB. Requires +/-5 VDC, 

• 5ppm internal crystal oscillator 

DDS3PC $199 kit. S299 assembled. 

• 8 bit PC bus version of DOS-3. 

• Sine output to +2QdBnri into 50n. 

• 0-70 dB step attenuator added. 

• Provision lor external clock added, 

• V-Basic and C software w/sources, 



NiW! 



DDS4PC $595 assembled only. 

•5 Hz to 34 MHz,0.02 Hz steps.Sine & TTL 

*32-'bitODS with 10-bit OAC. 

* ISA bus compatible w/software. 

-Call, Write, FAX or e-mail for catalog 

Novatech Instruments, Inc. 

1530 Eastlake Avenue East, Suite 303 

Seattle. WA. 98102 

(206) 322-1562 FAX (206) 328^6904 

e-mai!: novatech @ eskimo.com 



CIRCLE 25 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



f ' ^ l' 




HamCall CD-ROM 

us & International Call sign Lookup 
Over 1.130,000 listings and 105 Countries 

Includes US Clubs & Military Stationa. 
ICALL DOS $ windows program boks up: 
name, address, expiration date, birth yeti, 
license dass, county, lat/long. area c«<te, 
me zone, elevation, beam hea^dmg i 
distance betweefi US, ^tattons Grid 
St^ne Retrieve by any data etement on 
PC. call, name and z»p on thie MAC 
-!ijr»dined& of new shareware por^Fams a/e on this dr&c. Fdf a 
ar^er coOection of software as*^ abeM If* Etecironics Software 
Compen{^iifn CD ROM. 

• No hand d^ reqiired < Print Labels * Export to harti/dE^ 
or floppy • TSR nuns from (fid yAndmf * Updttod every April 
a Oct • landing orders accef3<ett -O^ief *acourt on25oi 
mofB ■ Latesl ptAfc domain PC software Same to** pric* d 
S50.00 p*^ S5 00 shipping (U S only} 

NewCO-Rom 

EiectmnJcs Software Compendum 

The Eledronics Software Coffipindium 

^ is a coOectMjn of shareware program* «nd 

i^ta files that pertain to e le c tronic i . broed- 

^ casting, amatejr rwfio and SWt activty 

Over 15,000 fBes hi total The dsic Is updated and issued 

anmia% in April Ovef 200 megabyte* of PC and 30 

megatiytes of MAC so^tuofc. Send your order !o Buckmw4er 

Publishing, $25.00 (*JS ^00 shipping (US). Checks 

accepted QUCKMAST^R 

Roiie 4, Box 1630 Mineral. VA 23117 
703:^4^5777 - 800:^2-5^8 
703:8S4-9H1(FaiE) 
tntemet info@budccom 

CIRCLE 5€ OM READER SERVICE CARD 






Is Your 
Shack Grounded? 



!/»" Jt t/2' 
110 Copper 




Ground 



«^1 



Sofid Copper Buss Sisiniess $t^et Hardwsre 

Grounding Stiid Evmy 6 Inches 

Top or Back inst3iiation 

Gruund Bit of your et^tpment chsssts'* to M 

singk' &0rth ground in one ea$y inst»ii^ti&n. 

Morwy back gusfmyteet it noi satitft^t 



*^$4.00 S/}i each 
Mtif cf^eck'inoney ordw to: 

35 Hilltop Ave^ D«pt 7 
SiamfoftI, CT 06907 



2fL $11.95 

3 ft $16.96 

4ft„„»$21^ 



CusiofTi 
LefT0fa 
A 



X Martin Systems 



CtRCi£ 2e ON READER SERVICE CARD 




X-eAND THANSMnTER 

Minialufe (?/* x y/4 x 
t")GaAsmicrostrip 

Itransmitier pro- 
vides 10 dBm centered at 10.525 GHz. 
Integrated microstrip patch antenna elimi- 
nates the need for an external antenna. 
Advanced matching techniques secured 
good temperature stability with Sow frequency 
pulling. Greatforlong-rangetestingot radar 
detectors, calibration of radar receiving 
eqifipment, and point-to-point communica- 
tion links. 

Comptete Assembled System ...» S39.00 

Parts & Instruction Kit $29.00 

Plus $2M Shipping and Handlmg 



INNOTEK Inc. 



P.O. Box 60096, Fort Wayne, IN 46898 
{2191469-1711 

Visa " MasterCard > Cliech • Money Order * COD 
Money-Back Guarantee 



CIRCLE 2a3 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




For The 
intimate 



1 00% made In th» U.S Jt 



Imagine 
your caSlsign 
on the 

Classic Clock! 



- SeaiittM, laminated origpnal artWNKfe- 

• Dumbly Quaitz nxMremerrL 

- SiMtaMe I6r«v3ll or de$k imtx^ r^^i2% 

• Huns on one AA battery {ynckjctadj 

• Speofy cafi£4^. 

• ChoiC€ otiStfTvJated waJnul, iight oak or ti^dic trama 

Bend f:hBf± er money areiar b: 

Excellcrce 

Box 1 551 • Uwchestsr, NH 03105 



73 Ama teur Radio Today • May. 1 995 17 



o 




fuil-wave diode rectiticr and filter capacitor 
mount on one hinird. This hoard plugs into 
ihe main reeulaior bi)ard holdins ihe LM3 17 
j\*L:ulators. You can add on a second, or 
ihird, regulator boiird by slacking iheni. A 
cable with a plug-on . 1 56 center connects 
al) the hoards togellicr. As I mentioned earli- 



i'ig(4re 2, PC himrd kiyom and pans placemenL 

cr. there Is an extended PC board which will 
hold eiffht of the LM3n nesulalors. 

Each regulator board \\\U hold four 
LM317 reculators. Each reeubior has its 
own voltage adjust poL You can build all 
four regulators, or only one, adding more on 
as your needs grow. Since each regulator can 



supply up to I amp of current, the trans- 

fortner and reciifier/filter hinird should be 
able ui handle the required current Il*s quite 
possible to have up to 16 amps of currcni if 
you add an two extended regulator boards 
and fully load (hem down. However, we're 
kindu lucky on this as the loads wall w^arls 



Jl 73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 



& 



ASTROIM 

C OR PORATIOfM 



9 Autry 

Irvine, CA 92718 

(714) 458-7277 • FAX (714) 458-0826 




MODEL VS-50M 



SLSE 




ASTRON POWER SUPPLIES 

HEAVY DUTY • HIGH QUALITY • RUG6ED • RELIABLE 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

• SOLID STATE ELECTRONICALLY REGULATED 

• FOLD-BACK CURRENT UMtTING Protects Power Supply 
from excessive current & Gontinuous shorted output 

• CROWEAR OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION on ail Models 
«iW[l1 ltS-3A. fL%M. ftS^5A. ftS-IL. «S &L 

• UMNTAJN REGULATION & LOW RIPPLE at low line Input 
Voltage 

• HEAVY DUTY HEAT SIWK • CHASSIS RfOUNT FUSE 

• THREE CONDUCTOR POWER CORD except for RS 3A 

• ONE YEAR WARRANTY • MADE IN U,SA 



PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 

• INPUT VOLTAGE: 105-1 25 VAC 

• OUTPUT VOLTAGE: 13.8 VDC t 0.05 volts 
(lnterimify Adjustable: 11-15 VDC) 

• RtPPLE Les& than 5mv peak to peak (lull load & 
low IFne) 

• All units available in 220 VAC Input voftage 
(except for SL-11A] . 



LOW PROFILE POWER SUPPLY 



MODEL 

SL-11A 
SL-tIR 
SL-11S 
SL-11B-RA 



Colors 

Bray Qlick 



« 



QDPninuius 
Duty lApps) 

7 
7 
7 
7 



ICS' 
fAmpt) 

11 
11 
11 
11 



H>«w>^b 

2% « ?% ^ 9% 
2%*7 «9% 

2%«7%«9% 
4^«7 *n 



Shloplng 
Wt llbtl 

12 
12 
12 
13 



RS-L SERIES 




• POWER SUPPLIES WITH BUILT IN CIGARETTE LIGHTER RECEPTACLE 

Canllnuaut O* Size [IN] 



MODEL 

RS-4L 
RS-5L 



Duly lAmptI 

3 
4 



(Anpt) 

4 

5 



\ 



HkWk 



Shippin 
WL (lbs 



6 
7 



RM SERIES 




19" RACK MOUNT POWER SUPPLIES 

CDntinuQus 
MODEL Duty (Acnpsl 



MODEL RM-35M 



RM-12A 

RM-35A 

RM-50A 

RM-60A 

Separate Vofl and Amp Meters 

RM-12M 

RM-35IVI 

RM-50M 

RM-60M 



9 
25 
37 

50 

9 
25 
37 
50 



lAmpsI 
12 
35 
50 
55 

12 
35 

50 
55 



Uzt (INI 
H>^WxD 

5^A X 19 >c 8 I 

5% X 19x12^ 

5% X 19 X \2'h 

7x19x13^^ 

5V.x19x8Vi 

5Vix19x12Vi 

5V4x19x12V; 

7x19x12^A 



Shipping 
Wt llbsl 

16 



SO 
00 

16 
38 
50 
60 



RS-A SERIES 




MODEL RS7A 



MODEL 

RS-3A 

RS-4A 

RS-5A 

RS^7A 

ftS-7B 

RS-10A 

RS-12A 

RS-128 

RS-20A 

fiS-35A 

RS-50A 
RS-70A 



COlOfS 



« 



9 
• 



Cofltiiivii 
Bllf (Aapsl 

% 
4 
5 

7.S 

9 
16 
25 

37 

57 



(Anftl 
3 
4 
5 
7 
7 
10 
12 
12 
20 



50 

7§ 



Si2i|INi 
H X W X S 

3 X 4^ X 5^ 
3^ X 6^^ X 9 

3^-^ X 6W X 7% 
3^ K%%^% 

4 X 71^ X 10^ 
4 X 7^^ X 10^ 

AVi X 6 X 9 

4 X 7^^ X 10^ 

5 X 9 X 10'^ 

5 X 11 X 11 

X 13^ X 11 

6 K 13¥4 X 12^ 



S&ippiii 

mi till.) 

4 
5 
7 

10 
11 
13 
13 
18 
27 

m 

48 



RS-M SERIES 



i 




MODEL RS-35M 



VS^M AND VRM-M SERIES 




MODEL VS-35M 



RS-S SERIES 




MODEL RS t2S 



MODEL 

Switchabfe volt and Amp meter 
RS'12M 

Separate volt arxl Amp meters 

RS-20M 

fiS35M 

RS-&OM 
RS-70M 



ClOtJBlOll 

Ditf liUipil 
9 

ie 

25 
37 

57 



ICS* 

12 

20 

50 

70 



Stzi (INI 
H X W X 8 

A^h X B X 9 

5 X 9 X 101^ 

5x11 X 11 

6x Wk X 11 

6 X nVA X \2% 



Skrppiif 

WLtlli.l 

13 

IB 

27 

46 
48 



m 



Separate Volt an<i Amp Meters " Oulpiit VUbQe idjustable ffw\ 2-15 vofts • Current limri adjustable from U amps 
to Full Load 



MOIEl 

VS'12IV( 
VS-ZOM 
VS-35M 
VS-50M 



Conlimts 
Dity ikmftl 

@13,eVDC @10VDC @5VDC 

9 S 2 

16 9 4 

25 15 7 

37 22 10 



liable rack moiinl power supplies 
\mM-35M 25 15 

VRM-50M 37 22 



7 

10 



\kmft] 

@ 13.8V 
12 
20 
35 
50 



35 
50 



tin (li] 
Hx w X D 

4^^ X 8 X 9 

5 X 9 X W^k 

5x 11 X 11 

6x 13^ X 11 



51&xl9x12Vr 
Sv*xl9x 12'4 



mm 

mt (lis J 

13 

20 
29 
46 



38 
50 



1 



Built in speaker 
MODEL 

RS-7S 
RS-IOS 
RS-12S 
RS'20S 

SL-11S 



EIny ilacli 

* • 

• m 



€fitiiifif 

8ily (Aapi) 

S 

7.5 
9 
16 

7 



ICS' 

Aapf 

7 

to 

12 
20 

11 



Sla [llt| 

It X Vlf X Q 

4 X 7"A x 10*/* 

4 X 7^ X WA 

41/2 X 8 X 9 
5 X 9 X Wk 

2^Ax7^x9Vi 



SlippUf 

Wt. iiH I 

10 
12 

13 
16 
12 



1 



CS~lnrermitiefit CommuntcaifCMi Serv.ce (5CHb Duty Cycle Smm cm 5 mi n. off) 



CIRCLE 16 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



supply ;ire usuiilly very small. The dead wall 
warts in my pile had currenis ranging from a 
low of 30 mA to a high of 800 mA. with jusl 
aboui everything else in beivveen. In my first 
Wan Remover, I settled tor a 2-amp rating, 
That^s enough for a 500 mA load on all four 
rcgylalors. 

How It Works 

The power transformer supplies the 
diode/filter boiird with about 14 volts. Since 
1 did not want in pimcr any of my 12-voll 
loads from the Wan Remover, the lower sec* 
ondary voltage from Ihe iransformer will 
help to keep the heal dissipation down on 
the regulators. 

The full- wave bridge rectifier and filter 
capacitor supplies the regulator 
htiard with a source of DC. On 
the regulator board, rcsisinr R20 
limits the current tlowing into 
ihc '*power on" LED. This LED 
glows whenever the Wart Re- 
mover is plugged into the AC 
mains. There is no •*on/off" 
switch. 

Diodes D! and D2 protect the LM3I7 
from reverse voltage damage from ballery- 
opcrated loads sncli as rechargeable lights 
and radios. 

For clarity, only one of the regulators is 
shown in the schematic of the Wart Re- 
mover. Remember, there are four regulators 
on each regulator board. 

Tile LM317 adjustable regulator is icxt- 
btK>k-simple. 1 added a small load to each of 
the regulators lo keep the LM3I7 stable un- 
der light- or no-load conditions. Each output 
is decoupled with a 10(X) (iF capacitor and a 
,01 capacitor, Tlie smaller tantalum capaci- 
tors on the input and output of the LM3I7 
keep the regulaior{s) from oscillating. 

Each LM317 has ils own trimmer used to 
set the output vnltngc, Rcsisiors Rl and R3 
make fine voltage adjustments a bit easier 
with the single-turn trimmer. All the trim- 
mers arc mounted llai on the PC board so 
you can adjust the output voltage without 
standing on vour head. If you stack more 
than one regulator board. youHl f^nd adjust* 
ing the bottom btiard interesting. I have tny 
top regulator board on a binge so 1 can 
swing it out oi the way to reach the bottom 
board. Really, once you set the regulatt>rs to 
their proper voltage* you won't need to mess 
with them again, uulcsh you want to change 
the voltage setting. 

Assembly 

I highly recommend the use of the two PC 
b^^ards for this project. Yes, you can use just 
aK">ut any method you feel comfortable with 
to build your own Wart Remover, btu the PC 
board is the wa> to go. Both PC boards and 
a kit of pans are available * . 

The main regulator board and the 
filter/rectifier board are single-sided. A plug 
with .156 centers connects the fiker/rectiller 
bc>ard to the regulator board. On each regu- 
lator board is a header. jKo on ,156 centers, 
lu piggyback a second or third regulator 



board. Remember to keep the total current 
within the rating of the rectifier and trans- 
former. If vou use the PC board set, you can 
use either plug on the regulator board. The 
headers have a locking tab making re\'erse 
polarity mistakes historv^. 

To avoid confusion when stuffing the PC 
board, each regulator and its components re- 
peat. For one main regulator board, there 
will be four Rl resistors, four CI capacitors, 
four C2 capacitors, and so on. Each of the 
four regLikaorh is identical in every way, 

Each ul the Umv individual LM317s has 
its own heat sink. You can use a small hunk 
of aluminum if you don't want to mess with 
the ones described in the Pans List. There is 
no need to insulate the LM317 from the heat 



**B^ careful when installing the many 
electrolytic capacitors — they must be installed 
correctly or you ^U smell burned capacitors T^ 



sinks, provided each regulator has its own 
heat sink. A word o\' caution however: If 
you use a single long strip of ahmiinum to 
heat-sink all the LIVI317s at one shot, you 
must insulate them from the heal sink. Ap- 
ply some thermal goo and fasten them down 
with 6-32 screws and nuts. 

Be careful when installing the many elec- 
trolytic capacitors — they must be installed 
correctly or you 11 smell burned capacitors! 

1 mounted the two PC boards, iransl'ormer 
and fuse holder on a small sheet of 1/8-inch 
aluminum, I believe it to be a cut-down 19- 
inch relay rack panel. A 1/4-inch hole drilled 
in each corner provides an easy method of 
mounting the Wart Remover tu the wall. 
This open-air construction also helps keep 
the LM317s cool by providing ii;ilural con- 
vection cooling. 

The rectifier/filter board has four mount- 
ing holes, one at each corner. Or. you can 
turn the board over and u.se the hole in the 
bridge rectifier to hold the assembly* This 
way, the aluminum mounting becomes the 
heat sink for the diode assembly, Use sonrte 
thermal goop here, too. 

Safely llrMl Be sure you incUide a fuse in 
the primary' of the power tran*^ former I use a 
3-amp faM-blow fuse in an enclosed fuse 
holder. Again, salciy first — use plenty of 
tape or heat-shrink tubing to fully protect 
yourself and others from any exposed 110 
AC points. My Wart Remover is bolted onto 
the wall. If you elect this method, too* some 
sort of safety cage would be a great idea, es- 
pecially if you have children in the house. 

The transfonner is not at all critical. You 
can use jusl about any 12-vo!t secondarv at 
whatever current it can deliver. Remember 
10 add up the total current you're going to be 
using when looking for a transformer. Good 
sources for transformers are surplus elec- 
tronic dealers, hamfests. or your buddy's 
junk box, 1 built a Wan Remover using a 
transformer from \\ defunct VCR! Worked 
great! In a pinch. Radio Shack carries sever- 



al that will fit the bill quite nicely. 

Of course, you"ll need the proper-fitting 
plug for each load. You could steal the plug. 
cord and all. from the wall wart» but don't 
Instead, wrap it up nicely and put it awa; in 
the original box it came from. This way 
vou* II know what it's for a year from now. 
Radio Shack carries an impressive collection 
of coaxial jacks. Mouser Electronics also 
carries dozens of coaxial plugs. 

Setup Adjustments 

All you really need to do is probe the otn- 
put of one regulator at a time and set its out- 
put voltage- The only precaution here is to 
set the output of the individual regulator for 
the voltage required by the imid and not the 
open circuit voltage of the wall 
wait! 1 have one wall wart listed 
at 9 volts DC but open circuit 
voltage read almost 17 volts* If 
you want to operate your tape 
recorder and it requires 6 volts, 
set one of the regulators for 6 
volts. It's a good idea to mark 
what regulator is running what load so you 
can refer hack to it if you need to at a later 
date. 

Adjustment 

Plug the transformer's secondary' into the 
rectifier/filter board. Plug the transtormer in- 
to the AC outlet. Check for about +14 volts 
at the output of the rectifier board-. Unplug 
the transformer from the AC mains. Now, 
plug the regulator board into the llher/recti- 
fter board. You can use cither plug on the 
regulator board. Put power to the trans- 
former and you should sec the LED glow. 
Now, all you have lo do is set the output of 
the lirst LM317 to whatever vohaide vou de- 
sire by adjusting the trimmer a^isociated with 
that LM3I7. Then, move on to the next reg- 
ulator Luuil you have them all set. 

The tinal step is to solder the proper con- 
nectors to the PC board. Be sure you have 
observed the correct polarity of your loadt 
You don't want to cook it because you 
hooked it up backwards. U would be a very^ 
eood idea to cleari\ mark each cable coming 
from the Wart Remover so you know what is 
what next month. 

Last Words and Precautions 

Everv wall wan load I've owned slates 

r 

something about voiding the warranty if the 
device is operated from something other 
than the wall transformer supplied, If you 
have second thoughts Libout powering your 
$500 walkthing with the Wart Remover, 
then don't. 

If your load recharaes its own internal 
batteries (rechargeable fiashlisihts. HTs. or 
hand drillsj, proceed with caution, ,Vlany of 
these loads count on the wimpy regulation 
of the wall wart to keep from overcharging 
the batteries. 

There's the possibility of cross-wiring 
some devices, depending on how they are 
wired internally. I've not had this happen, 
but there may be times when you would 



20 73 AmatQur Radio Today • May. 1 995 



ORDER NOW 1-800 4 HOBBY KITS 




AIRCRAFT RECEIVER 



communications — 
pick up planes up to 
100 miles away! 
Receives It 0-1 36 
MH2 AM air band, smooth varactor tuning superhei with 
AGC, cei-amic fflief, adjustable squelch, exceflent 
sensitivily and lots of speaker volume. Runs on 9V 
hattefy. Great lor air shows or lusi twanging afomd the 
ajrport! New SO-page manual details pilot talk^ loo. Add 
case $61 for tsfo" look. 
AR-1 kjl 529.95 Matching case sel. CAR ...SI 4.95 



FM RECEIVERS & TRANSMITTER 



Keep an ear on the local repeater, police, vveatFier or iust 
ture anound. These sensitive supertvei rec&we^ art tun to 
bitW and use. Tunes any 5 MH2 portion ol trie band and 
have srrtoolh varador tuning wJth AFC. dual Conversion, 
cefwnic fitienng. squelcti and pienty ol speaker vo^me. 
Complete manual detatis how the rigs woiic and 
appliCatKms. 2M FM transmitter has 5W RF out Cfystal 
contid 1^46.52 cctudedl. pfChspecs and datfknistpils. 
Add our case sets lot a r^tce Hntsli. 
FM Rececver krl Speofy bancs; FH*146 (2*1). FR-6 (5M1, 

FR 10 (lOMl FR 220 i220MHi)._.„„. ...$34.95 

CFFI Matching case set „™.™.,.,w^„,^„..**_l1 4.95 

FT-146 Two Meter FM {ra-sn ::;- kit S99.95 



SYNTHESIZED AUDIO GENERATOR 



I DDS (Oirecl Dig ft at Synthesis) 

l inj technology brnga you a temfic audio 

Jr^ generator at a fantastic price' 

/l n GeneraiesfwnO.0i HitoSOKHcwith 

\J kJ f*^^ **?* L^ *si3iay direquency- Sine 

— — ^ ^ * and squaj^ wave output adjustable 0-5 

voli \hp. Frequency selected by direct keytioard entry and 

wth handy ccMitHiuous tune tunwig knob. C-rystaJ controlled 

accuracy of IQ ppm and two merriories lor rapid frequericy 

changes. Retire ttiai jary-rigged otd generator and treat 

yOurseLl to ths pleasure ol using a new state-of-the-art SG- 

550' 

SG'550 Kil SI 99.95 SG'550WTasse^Wed S269.95 



MICRO-MIKE 



Wor^d^s smallest f M wireless 

mike. Smaller than a sugur cu5e 

- induding battery and rtiike. Two 

seis of SMT parts supplied in 

case you are clumsy! Terrific 

audio pck'Up [pin drop at 5 ft) and (ransmti fange ol 300 it. 

Wb inclyde I he baltery (walch style), elect rot mike and 

even a tuning tool! 3e a James Bond and learn SMT too! 

FM-5 Micro mike kit.,. S19-95 




FM WIRELESS MIKES 



Pick t^ke unit ]t\ats ngM for you. AH unns transmit a stable 
SpgnaJ m the 88-106 MhU f^ band up to 300' except for 
High power FM4 and PS*t Phone t^ that go up to 1/2 
mde. 

FM-i Basic unii ...,__ — «««, » SS.% 

FM-2, as above 

but With added mike pre amp ««,«.„«*«*.. S7.95 
FM^, tong range wrlh 

very sensitive audb pickup ...t***«.**^^^....$14S5 
Pfrl. Pnone bug needs no batteiy* 

hocks to phone rir>e ,.,...S14 J5 

MC-t , Micro size sensitive mike cartridge 

l\Jlfl r^lVl I ^£i p^T* TT^ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■'^■■■■■■■'■4 ■ i 4- + + -li« b ■ ■ ri i-^ik-b-ldl »■■ l-di-k ta i ■ ■ ■ >i r-r^iH-t^rV 




SHORTWAVE RECEIVER 



FantasE'C r^ceivet that captures ttie 

world wiEti jusi a 12' antenria! Can 

fBceiwa atny 2 MH; portion froin 4- 1 1 

MHz. True superh«t. has smooth 

var actor tuning. AGC, RF gain 

owitroi, pJemy d speaker ubkme and rurs ofv a 9V bsaes)f. 

Fasbnatrig ScouL sctwol or dub profect. provides Nms of 

hxi ibr evtf^ Vie rrast seiioim DXer For the car, consider ou' 

shorrwave conveder. Two swildtaOJe bands (in 3-22 MH; 

range), each 1 MHi wide-HunaUe on your car rado dial. Add 

some tf^eresj to your drwe Horrie^ 

Shchrtwave fecsiver krt, SB1 „,..,„„... S29, 95 

Sr^oftvvave converter kit SCI , .......^ S27S5 

Matching case set for SRI. CSR „„„*„„„«„*S14.95 
Matching case sei for SCL CSC 514.55 



AM TRANSMI 



(High quality, Erue AM broadcast tiand transmitter is designed 

exactly like the tug porrrnefcial rigs. Power of 100 mW, tegal 
range Ol up to 1/4 mHe. Accepts line level inputs (rom tape 
and CD ptayefs and mike mixers, tunable &50-1750 KHi. 
GompleEe manua' explains ctrcuiliy, he^ with FCC feps and 
even antenna ideas. 8e your own Rush Limbaugh or RicN 
Dees vviih tne Af^-1! Add our case sei for a tiue station looit. 

AM-1 Transmitter k3l^«^,«„ ^..^$29.96 

CAM Matctiirig case se t Si 4.95 



SCANNER CONVERTER 



» et 



Ti,fie iri on the eoo^SSO 1*^ actwi tising 

your emt^ng scanner. Frequencies are 

ocKwerted HfHh crys&i refer ocuct itebiiy 

to fii 4Q0-S50 MHz range. Inseuctions 

a^fV i¥$n ir^lutfed on building high 

periormance 90G W^ antennas Wei desgned oiciii features 

extensive IMMiig and conveniem orhoFfibypass swMdi Easy 

om houi assembly Of avaiabie lully assembled Add our 

mai:l»ng case set tor a professfonal look. 

SGN-t Scanner convertef kit.... .»„...,„„„„„... S49.95 

SCN Matching case set r........ .>,..*...., .51 4.95 

SCN~1 WT Assembled SCN-1 and case.. $^9.95 



SURROU1SID-SOUND/REVERB 



Add concert half realism to your stereo. TV or even 2-way radio! Easily sythesi^e a stereo effect from mono sources or richly 
enliven regular music. Add a big-yoice reverb to your radio voce that others will envy! Our reverb/surround sound kit uses a 
Bucket Gngada IC Device for reliable solid -^taie periormance. Adjustable reverb, delay and mix conlrcis to customize your 
sound. Easily connected to radios, stereos. CB's and TV's. Plenjly ol audio to drive a small Speaker for stand-alone 
operaijon Iod. ExpedererbCe the iun and realism that sunound sound provides ^ without spending hundreds! Add our case set 
for a neat, pro look. 

RV-1 Surround Sound/Reverb kit .....«.«««.t.S59.95 CRV Matching case set........».....,». ««„..S14.95 

flV-lWT Assernbled RV* 1 and casa. .„,,„ „„.., ..„_„,...****.*,«.,«,,*♦♦*♦*« ♦,,.,56 9. 95 



TOUCH TONE REMOTE CONTROL 



Cci^Ol V anyttiing by Touc^Tone remote (^ntrot. The tjHC-t has 18 swtttied outputs, 4 adfusiabie village outputs 

|20 niV Gtaps u to 5 VOC), hm tOK digrlat pots (l» volume, squeteh, etc.) and 3 ttmecs adjtsta^ fr om 1 mS lo 40 rKH^rs^ 
Two \tmA password control alows secure cotm^ ai»d ni4ii4eve^ acc«s& $it dtgit LED display st>ows curremfy er^'ed 
cqdes and a ovstar cDntraled SMjch-tcrie decoder provides reliable operabon. ihere's nod>ir>g else like this unii be bi 
coirvlele control dt re^note ladke* fhemvislate, hj-fi's. homes or even factones *ilh the UftC-l. Add our ma^iwig case set 
lot a har^dsoma ir«sh. 

U RC- 1 Remote cent rol kH „ .„«„.«« Si 29U95 CUnC Matching case set ■■■■.■■...■.„.., ■■■■ . . 51 4.ffi 

URC-1WT Fully assembfed UHC-I and case 5189.95 



FM SUBCARRIER DECODER 



Tap inm tie wortd Of commenjial-lree music and data that is carni.- r many standard FM broadcas: radb stations. 
Decoder hooks to the demodulator of FM radio and tunes the 50-100 KHz SCA sutx:arrier band. Many radios have a 
demod output, but if your radio doesn't, ii's easy lo bcate, or use our FR-1 FM receiver kit which is a complete FM radio 
with a demod lack buiil-in^ These "hidden" subcamers cariy lots of neat programming - from slock quotes lo news lo 
music, from rock to easy listening - all comnlercia^ free, Hear what youVe been missing m^ tbe SGA'1 , 

SCA-1 Decoder krt .„ S27.§5 CSCA Matching case set ***...»*,.. .514,95 

FR 1 FM receiver kit $24.95 CPB Matctling case for Ffl-1 ..„.S14,9S 



L-C METER 



Measure mdudois fmm to uH-iOmH and capacitors Item 2 pF-^uF with high accuracy by connecting ihe LC-T to any 
dtgiJai muKmeler. Two pushbutton ranges lor high resolution readings and we even give ybu calb ration components to 
assume pfOper atccuracy of yoi^ kit' Active titers and switctwg supplies rsQuf^ cniticai valuK, no one siioukj be wittiout 
an accurate LC meter. For a pro bok, add our tnalching case set. 
LC-1 LC meter kit ,„.„., „,.„„,„.., .534.95 CUC case set — S1435 



STEREO FM TRANSrWITTER 



^^., your own Stereo FM rad^io station! Transmits a stal)te signal 
' ' e S8 103 MHz FM brosdcas; band up to 1 mile Detailed 
fnanua! provides helplvl into on FCC regs. antenna ideas and 
range to eipect Latest d^gn features adfuslable t ne level 
inputs^ pre-emphasjs and oystaJ contro^iieo siulKftrrier. Connects 
to any CD Of lape ptayer. mike miier or radio. Indudes tree 
luwig tool tool For a pro took add our miiching case set with on- 
boanj whip antervia 

FM-10A Stereo iransmrtter kit .»«^„»>> „..,. ^.534.95 

CFM Case, whip ani set „„„„„. „,S14.9S 




DR. N[-CAD CONDfnONERff=AST CHARGER 



Quit spending big bucks for replacement t>altery packs, rejuvenate and condition your 
battefies tor peak capacity. Advanced circuitry has optimized discharge before charge to 
eliminate merrior/ eflect and to condition battenes that have been poorty cared for in the 
past. Ou4ck charge rapi:dly brings battery Ed full charge in less than an tiour-just 15 
minutes for some types ^ And 'top-off charge mode squeezes every last bi| of energy 
into each cell lor Ihe absolute most cspacity. Switch-mode regulator controls constant 
current charge while being monitored by a negative delta-V system that cuts of I the last 
charge an he exact pomt of full ctiarge-batteries are diargedi not Cooked! Charges 
NiCadS or HMH pad^ Irom 2 to 10 cells (easjiy eKpanded) and current capacities up to 
10 Amp'hiours Runs on 12 to 15 VtX^. Quit cooking your battenes, buying new packs, 
waitir>g hours lor nechafge, gel a Dr. Ni^ad today! Available m money saving kit Icn^ or 
wired and tested with case at a special price. Kit biiders; add our malchtng case set for 
a snazzy firvsh 
OPI-1 Dr. N^-Cad cooeStioner/last charger kil S49,95 

^kjfni nriaitJimy OaSc 56l — ..-T .r+++-.i++*++++-p*T++..,+++-p*++**4i-M-i-*"-»i-»*"-"-»"-»ii-"-»»n-M-«-"^-".»"-""""^ I^.S^B 

DN 1 WT Fiylly assembled Dr. Nj-Cad with case . ^-^^ — .^^^ — ..SaS.95 




SPEED RADAR 



F4ew low^osi moDwsve Dtvplef rad«r kit 'docks' cars, ptanes. bolts, tntms, UkesQr mvf 
lar^e moving obfed Operates at 2,6 GHz with up to t.M mli rarap. LED 
di>gjtail nsadOul displays ^peed in nvies per hour. kLlorneCeflt i^rliouf Of 
feet per second' Earphone output alows for Icslening to actual Dopplef 
J^ . shift Lbes two 1 -Eb colfee can« lor antenna (not includedl and runs on 1 2 
BS VDC. Easy to butM— alf microwave circuitry ts PC slnpline. ABS plastic 
*V case with a^ieedy graphics tor a professionat look, A very useful and lull- 
ol-fun kit 
SQ-7 Complete kH 599.95 



STEREO PEAK HOLD BARGRAPH 



Finally a dual LED bar graph witfi a peak hold display! Bar graph displays are neat and eye 
catering but their speed is their downfall - thoy just can't capture the peaks. Ouf kit is like 
two units tn one, a fast display to slicw tlie signal and a long persislarK^e display to capture 
peaks, sim^r unils go for hundreds ol tHiOks! We otter 3 modets: Linear for general use, 
Serri-Log for audio VU meters, and Log for power displays. Dual - for stereo! - 10 segment 
rnutii<oiored LEO display tor snazzy, eye grabbing display and easily set ranges for 
vvtuatly any s«(^ials. fmnn voltmeters to audio \/y meters to audio power amps to SVi/R 
meters. CompMe intrujions lor easy fiook-up to most any device. Add our malcliing case 
set lor a sharp looJ^r^g unt. 

PH^t4 Dual Linear Oargr^ph kit ...^....S39.95 Bl-15 Dual Log bargraph kil ..S39.^ 
PH-16 Dual $efti-L09 barg^ph M S3B.95 CPH Malch4f>q case set „S14.9S 



SPEECH SCRAMBLER 



Descramb'e rr'icsJ scrEfry^le sysien^ heard 
«j your scanr*er radio Of set up your own 
scambled communication system over tne 
phone or radio. Latest 3rd generation IC >s 
used for tantastic audio quality - equivalent 
to over 30 op -amps and mixers^ Crystal 
controBed for cry&SaF clear found with a bui'i- 
in ;? watt audio amp for direct radio hook-up. 
For scramble systems, each user has a unit 
for lull duplex operation. Communicate In 
privacy with the SS-70. Add our case sol for 
a line prolessional finish. 
SS'70 Scrambler /descramblerki! ...,$39.95 

CSSD matching case set.... S14,gs 

SS-70WT Assembled 

SS-70 and case set ^ STO.ftS 



CRYSTAL 
RADIO 



Belive the radio past with a crystal set 
nke your grarKlfathter built. Uses genuine 
Galena crystal and catwhisker. Several 
different types of radios are built, 
including standard AM broadcast, 
shonvi/ave and even W\/\^ II foxhole 
style. To compare modern semicon- 
ductor detectors, we include a diode for 
comparison. No soldering required and 
we even give antenna ideas. Radio for 
tree, get it now belore Clinton laxes it! 

CS-1 Crystal set kit, 519-95 



TOUCHSTONE DECODER 



Grail Toucr>-Tone nunbers f^ off the aif. pr>QfiB o/ tape. A sjmpde :.v^',-yp to any ratio 
speaker pr phone line is aji diat is enquired to instantly dec»pner loucn-tone phone 
numbers or codes. A 2S6 dgft irafnory stores decoded iiam|>ecs arid keeps Fts martory 
even m the event k& power bss. An 8 digit LED disptoy aitows you to soon Ehmugh te 
memof^ t^arik to examine numbefs. To make it easy to pidt oui number groups or c^xies, 
a "dash" IS inserted between sets of digits If^t were decoded rrMsre than 2 seconds a^sit 
A 'centraJ-o^»ce' quality crystal cor^uM decoder is ified altowf^ rapid ar^ reftal]le 
detedKin of numbers at up to ^ digits per second! For a professionally Rntshed look, 
add our matdwig case set Start crackjng those secret codies tomorrow with ifie Tone 
Grabber* 

TG*1 Tone Grabber kit .,599,95 CTG Matching case set St4,9S 

TG-1WT Fully assembtedTG-t and case ..., .„...........S149.95 



DIGITAL VOICE RECORDER 



ChatterbCK digital voice storage unit will record your message of up lo 20 seconds. 
Time is split up into four S second blocks which can be played separately or 
cascaded for longer messages. An LEO display shows message localion and 
current mode for easy operation. Nifty bkjiihn interfaces allow simple connectian to 
transmitters tor automatic keying when Itie PTT is initially closed or after It is 
released You can even loop your ng's mike tt^rough the Chatterbo*. For contest or 
lun use, the CS-t can drive an external speaker. Indudes a tH^it-in eiectret mike. 
For tfiat fir^sNng toucti, add our matctiing case set 
C8-1 Voce recorder kit S59.K CCB fetching case set Si 4. 95 



hrtOTOR CONTROLLER 



Control V ?d and dH^ckn o* any motor. Lise ckj^ SWD-t for those rm^ steppers you 

see surplus, and otir MSCM Eor DC motors, Tlv stepper dmi^r features vanaUe speed, haJf 
step nMOfit dindKjn and power down mode, can dr^ rr^ost any stepper motor. Our DC 
driver feature putse width modi^bion contni alowng fult motor lott^ue even at 
low speeds and can dnve moor^ up to 50 VDC lO AmpsI Add our case set 
for a professional assembly. 

.1 SMD'l Stepper kit .S24J5 MSC-1 DC motor kit S24.9S 

^^ CSMD SMCKl case .....Sf 4.95 CMSC MSC-t case $14.95 




OftOERS CALL 1-800-4 HOBBY KITS (446-2295| ORDERS ONLY 
TECH/ORDEFmNFO (716)924-4560 FAX (716J924-4555 

3TEflMS Sansfaction guaranteed Ejiamin* for 10 days ITtics^ ptoased relurn in originas fDnn 
\m ferund Add SJ 9S for stripping handling md in^uranc^. Finr faf^ign «pdefs a<ld 20*^* Tor 
^g sur1a<C« mail COD (US only) add 59.00 Orders umSer S20 add S3 00 NV r«SK]«nlA acki T^c 
|in safes tat 90-dav parts warranty on kit pert* l yftaf part* a labor warmr^fv on wired units 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS. (NO 793 CANNING PARKWAY VICTOR NY 14554 



CIRCLE 34 ON READER SEVICE CARD 



conned a tape lecorder lo n radio via a patch 
cord. It the radio chiLssis is at "+'' voliage 
and the recorder h at "-" voltage, things 
would beoome imcrcHUng. Tve not had this 
happen as mo^-i of (he "+" ground devices 
are insulated from the common ground. 
Check to be sure heforc assuming every- 
thing is at the sLime poieniiaL 

You can supply she regulator boafd diiect- 
ly ("mm a 12-vali supply such as your main 
rig*s power supply. When you power up ihe 
rig, all the external loads will nlso come up. 
You can also use a 12-voll battery to power 
the Wart Remover, loo. Don*t forget to in- 
stall a fuse in the supply line in either case. 

If you need some (ow voltage AC, steal it 
from the recti fier/nUcr K)ard. There are two 
pads tin the board just for that piirpi^vse. Re- 
member to keep track of the total current be* 
ing pulled from the I ran s former 

Even ihouijh rhea' is not enough voltaiic 
for the regulators to provide +12 volts, you 
can still delete a I2-voli wall warl if the load 
curreni is not t^x> high. You should he able 
to set one LM317 at 13 vohs and draw 100 
mA or so from it be lore the voltage drops 
too low and the IC falls otu of regulation-^* 

If you need in sol the tniiput of ihe reguki- 
tor to a real low DC voliage. say. 3 volts, 
you may need to play with the values oi ihc 
resistors in the voltage divider 

I don^i know if adding a fuse for each out* 
pui would be worth ihe lime Luid effort. An 
LM3 17 will shut down during a short circuit 
condition. The LM3I7 wilt also shut down if 
it overheats. 

Last Page 

I hope you have as much fun as I did in 
designing the Wart Rctnover. h\s fast. 



Ri 

R2 

R3 

R4 

R6 

R20 

02 

D3 

04 

CI 

C3 

C4 

05 

U1 

BRt 

DS1 

Heat lanN 

J1 

J2 

J3 

J4 

Fficticin lock PC tieaders 



Parts List 

240 

Ik trimmer 

560 
240 

4.7k 

TN4002 
TN4002 

imoo2 

470 mF 

4.7 mF 

.1 mF 

4.7 mF 

LM3t7T adiustat>te regulator 

6-amp bridge diode 

Red LED 

2-position J 56 terminal housing 
2'PQsrtion J 55 lemiinal housing 
4-postlian .156 temiinal housing 
4il06(tK}n .156 terminal housing 



Mousef#53T-PTC10V-tK 



Crimp tefminal tor terminal housing 
Mouser Electronics: 1 -800 346-6873 
Digikey Electronics: 1-800-344-4539 



Mouser#51MJy3l7T 
Mouser #333-BR61 
Junkbox 

Mouser P567-7-371-6A 
Mouser #53&-09-50-3021 
Mouser #538-09-50-3021 
Mouser #S3S^09-50-3041 
Mouser #538-09-50-304 1 
Mouser #538-26*48^1246 

or 

DlglKey #VVM4602-N0 
Mousef #538-08-0106 



simple, and fun to build. Even easier to use! 
Of course, now that you have ali those open 
wait outlets, ihirik of all the new rigs ymi 
can get! Q 

Notes: 

L A complete set of PC hoards, ihe filler 
recliller and uric main regulativr hniard, and 
all parts texcepi for the iransformer), is avail- 
able for $45 fa>m SunLislit Enef]g:y Systems, 
2225 MavHinvLT NW, Massillon, OH 44647. 



Board set only $15 from FAR Circuits, 
l8Nf>+a Field Court. Dundee, IL 6011 8. 

Extended reguiaior btiard $26 from FAR 
Circuits. 

i The actual output frenn ihc filter reclifi- 
er board will be determined by the trans- 
former used. 

3. Using a higher-voltage twtsfomier and 
changing oui ihe two resisior^ in ihe voltage 
divider will alknv for full I -amp current al 
12 volts. 



To subscribe to 73 Amateur Radio Today or Radio Fun 
simply call 1 (800) 274-7373. Don't miss another great issue! 




SMART AC or SOLAR 
BaTTER\ COMROLLERS 



FOR GEL^-CEU^ OR IJ:HJ^A CID BA 7TFRJES 
fl TO 28V. 1 10/220 VAC. 50/60 HZ 
i^gg^fjB^VriLLfiOT OVERCHARQ£L US£S UCSSOO UC. 
SWTTCHABLE or RREKT. REVERSE BATTIRY 
PROTCCmON, TKICiaE 8TARJ-UP, DBL SIDED 
PCS. ^REW TERUINMJS. PTC FUSE. * lUNUAL 

BASiq KTT f TO 14V; 1 AMP UMi ,..„.... . _^^| 54 »S 

Z4T0 2«V iva. ._! S4.85 

OPTION8: TRANSFOftMEFt ^ 1 10.9fi 

AUTO LOW VOLT DIS CO NNEDTW ALARM OUTPUT, .„| Ift.OO 

ALL METAL ENCLOSURE ......f CALL 

ENCLOSURE WTTK CUSTOM MrTtH.....,, « S CALL 

30LAR COhrrftOLLER: DUAL LEVEL VOLT CONTROL f 54 OS 

dC-Qi: S AMP CHARGER W AMMETER A ENCLOSURE .,ftae.W 



crRTlSK EVER KIT 



tNClUDES AUDIO AUPUFIER, IAMBIC KEYING. ADJUtTAetE 

©PEED CONTROL J3«J»: SPEED MEIER _t UM 

POeJNEO JffYINO. TONE-WElOffr CONTROL ^-^-.. S 10.0Q 



ANTENNAS: l^^\\^ I \n \ \U\U R MM 



MA RCONt worn* tgiT^iftMflOM- .^. ^•44,«ft 

J^P OLES : (ai. Ml, ^0, 440 UHZ} S 9JB9 TO f 42.m 

£, Haupstbu], NH ii3Cl«-a»ti« 
l-QOO-UAOE PRO 

Fak *fa^%A*n 

IttMUSA SIflPFIHCa CHAROf 
VISA. UASIXnCAftD. CHECKS U Q 
mtfi: JM(i o^ c suiui cf Tq atrttct 




I^PII MG 1 HE AMATFJR BWK W fV«lKi 



DIRECTION FINDERS 

VECTOR- FINDER 

HAKD-HELD 

PHASE SENSE 

ANTENNAS FOR 

VHP D I RECTI OH 

-^^ FINDING. USES 

Jl^ ANY FM RCVR. 

^ ARMS FOLD FOR 

STORAGE. 

TYPE VF-142 144-220 MHZ S139-9B 
TYPE VF-142Q LEFT-RIGHT LEDS S^ 

AUDIO, 144-220 MHZ S239-95 
TYPE VF-142QM SAME AS Q MODEL 

EXCEPT FREQ. 144-500 MHZ $285-95 
TYPE VF-^1210 SAKE AS VF-142Q 

PLUS 1 2 1,5 MHZ EL T FREQ S379-95 
CALL ABOUT HF DF, 




ATTENDATORS 



ADD $4,50 S/H 
CA ADD TAX 



RADIO ENGINEERS 



yj 7969 ENGINEER RD, #102 
V SAN DIEGO, CA 92111 

619-56S-1319 FAX 619-571--5909 



I' 
ii 



SAM 



Amateur Radio 
Call sign Database 



Rnd Hams quictdy and easily by Callsign Of by 
Name Search for a speciUod Crty, S1al«, or Zip 
CocSe. Print with startdard or customized o^put. 
Ideal for mailing lists. QSL's mc. NEW FOR 'M, 
search fiHers that allow you to specify FIRST I^AME, 
UCENSE CLASS. AGE. ADDRESS, or CALL 
SUFFIX, AREA. OR PREFIX. 

SAM OptFon files include County Cross Reference, 

License Expi ration Date. Full Date of Birth, 

Previous Calls and Date First Licensed 

Req u i res [ BM Compat i ble PC. 1 7 5 MB of ha rd 
drive space, and htgh-denstty floppy drive, 

MOW AVAILABLE ON CD4%OM 

DiskVefsion S39.95 CD^OM $39.96 
S-4Af OPTIONS $7.50 each 

RT SYSTEMS, INC 

6207 STEPHANA DRIVE. KUNTSVILLE AL 35602 

1-800^723-6922 or 1 -205^&S2 9292 

ViSS MasterCard or Discover 



CIRCLE 58 OH READER &EHVtCE CARD 



22 73 AmBteur Radio Today • May, 1 996 





KJTTY SAYS: WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

SaL 10-5 SiHilM M-fa-e Come to Banys for the best buys in town 



For the best buys in town call: 

212-925 7000 

Los Precios Mas Bajos en Nueva York 

WE SHIP WORLDWIDE! 

Export orders expedited. 




MOTOROLA 



Yaesu Vtrity 
Poitablts 

FTH^2070 duHl boncl 
VHF/UHFSwBtlfVXfiOO, 

FTH 2oaa/7ooa/VTH 
soDQnpmaf 



Wherever I go, I take my radio. 

Specialist in RADIOS; 

Business marine aviation, 

ttam radios and scanners. 




o 

SP10, SP50, P1 10- GP3000, M120, ir^rMVJi 

GM300. GR300 repealers. I ^ W IV] 

Domestic, exports and gov't orders, 281*H, 481-H, 2340-1^. 

2700-H. IC-D10O. QP^22A 

[COM Business Radios 

New F30LT/F4aLT, H16, U16, 
VI 00, and repealers 



COhfTACI US FOR THE LATEST JN 

BUSINESS AND HjW FiaDIDS, 

SHORTWAVE FlECEtVEfiS & SCANMERS, 

MOTC*»LA. VAEEU. ICOM, KEMWOOE). 

AUNCO, STANDARD, WW(OH REUyl 

QENDtlS. IdHG. ^Ony. SAm3£aM. 



u 



KENWOOD 



YAESU Mam & Vertex Business Radios 

FT-e90. FRG-1008. FT-lOOOD, FT-53Q, FT'5200, R-530-FT411E. 
FT-e40.FT'900AT, FRQ^IOOB, n".2400, FT-23n, FL-7000 Linear- 
New VXR-5000 synthesized repaater 25 watts. VHP or UHR 



H 




ANTENNAS 

A-S, AtS. Cushcraft, M^^aan, 
Husiief, KLM. METZ, \Jrtatt, 
MODUBLOX. IDUHK Bottemt. 



YAESU 

FT-2aR/2e/76 

FT411 £-611-911 

FTH.2005f700a 



ICOM 

\C2t3IASAT 
iCOZAT/aSRA 
ICZ/4G AT/24 AT 
IC-A21AJ16 



LAn^mab\im HTs 
ICOM UiO, M16. VIOO, U400 
MAXOI^. MOTOROLA. 
YAESU fJHSOO&fTOOe 
ijUttXH. PEGENCV. KING. 

vu4i\tm. ICOM U7 y^e. lurTtm 

AVIATOR ICOM A^l A200 K 1 . TAO 



Telephone Autopatch 

Patches telephone caRs from 
yotir radio to pfxine line, Great 
for making and recejvff>g 
phone calls where Ihere are 
no phone lines. Simple to use. 
Write or fax for inquires. 



"TS-SOS", TS450S^AT. R-5000, TS-8SflS, 
TM 341/W441 A, TR~751 A, Kenwcjod Service 
Repair, TS14aS, TS690S, RZ-1, TS-79GA, 
TS9S0SD, TH-78A, TH28/46A, TM-941 A» 
TM-741A. TM-732A TM-641 A, T1VI-742A. 



MARINE RADIOS 
COW M7 Ml T. M56, M700TY. MBOO 

AVIATION POffTABLE ICOM A-2T 
MOTOROLA MAi=l^^E KI^JG KX 99 



£CAH^I5& 


M,^j 


AOR: 


'IbS^H' 


900. 1tMd. 


^^^^9 


1 500. 2M0. 


^HH^H 


a*oo,3opOA 


^B^^l 


ICOM: 


' M^^l 


ft-i.niDo, 


I^^^^H 


n71A,n72A. 


l^^^^r 


RTOSa 


^^^^1 


F77lO&t 


^^^H 


ftsow 


^^^^H 


Bearcat 


^^^H 



ICOM 

HANOHELDS 

aGXAT, 4GXAT, 

T21A, W21AT, 

V21AT.X21AT. 

icoS 

Repealers 
VHFofUHF 




Ullralite 

UMmaie. transportable Eglephone 
' corrtfTHjntcation terrmrtai Make 
and receive phone calls, tax, telejt 
anywhere in the world Mrfiere 
there are no phone lines Small, 
compact with 1.2 meierdrsh. Fits 
in suitcase. MIL 3td. StO specs. 
Write or call. 



Save money on batteries. 
Ask lof Special Prices, 



Survelflance Devices 
Available 



Linear Ampfffter 

Anveritfon. Iconic Kenrwocd, Yaesu 



W2IAT 
2GXAT 



fC-HIA/Uie 
IC2IA 



Shortwave Receivers 

•SaiS(Y*GRUNDlG 

• SANGEAN • «COM 
CaH2212-92&-7000 

telephone in suitcase for 
worldwide use. call 



iOTDflOtJ RADIUS 
COMMERQALAABIOS 



TH-79A 
Kenwood 



FT-530 

Vaeso 



CB Radios Stocked 

148 GT2, Wanngton, Ranger 2950-70, 
Wilson 1 000, 10/1 1 Meter Antennas. 
Antron, Shakespeare, etc, 
Astatic power mlcs, 
Sih/er Eagle w/beep, etc. 



Computer Interfaces 
Stocked: MF J- T270B, 
MFj-1274. MFJ-1224, AEA 
PK-8©. MFJ- 12781. PK-900, 
PK-232 M8X W/FAX, DRSl 
PRODUCTS DSP 2232 




Barry's supplies all 
MFJ products 
Call us direct. 



Antenna Tuners: 

MFJ, AEA AT-30a, 

ICOM^ KENWOOD, 

YAESU. VERTEX 



CQMMEaCIAL 

AHAM 

RiPEAt^ftS 

STOCKED. 

QUOTES 



KAM PLUS KPC 2^4. 
rtPC3400 SUP^R FAX fl 

KPC IV. D^i3 En^j^v. D4- 
10 e^ 



Cnv<?rcfaft/CoaKSeal Stockfct 



SHORTWAVE RECEIVERS 
STOCKED 



AUNCO DJ^SMT, iXI-$a2T, 

OJ-FIT, EW^FITH. DH-130«30T, 

DJ-IMTH'H 



Privacy scramblers 
for radios and 
phones. CALL 



Wide selection of SW & 
Amateur Publications 

BIRD Wattmeters & 
Elements In Stock 



A£MJ|ilMO«»tt, 
ANLI Anttfiiu 



QiactCeshci^ 






Bt 



(144, 220, 440 
WiHz), tsoloop. 




EIMAC 
3-500Z 
572S, 6JS6C 
12BY7A& 

61466 

BIRD 
attmeters & 

Elements 
In Stock 




MOTOROLA AUTHORIZED DEALER 

KACHINA COMMUNICATIONS DEALER 

AUTHORIZED aiif>lif»ers 

DEALER STOCKED: 

SONY, ;^t" 

Shortwava Radios Stocked '^^rsrtms 

DiGtTAL FREOUENCt COONTEf^ 

OPTOELECTRONICS model 1300 H/A. 0-1300MH2 

2300, 2£10 H^ 0-2200 MH2, 2600H, UTC-SOOO, 2010 

Long-range Wireless 
telephone for overseas. CALL 



Radios for Business, 

Government, 
Stocked & Serviced 
Call for Great Prices! 



COfCTANTBiMS 
STOCKED 



BENCHER PADDLES 

BALUNS, LOW PASS FILTERS 

IN STOCK 



MtRAGE/RFC Amplifiers 
ASTRON POWER SUPPLES 
Belden Wire & Cable, Int'l Wire 

OPTOELECTRONICS STOCKED 



Shortwave Radios 



JRC, ICOM, 
KENWOOD. YAESU, 
SONY and GRUNOIG 



Hy-Gain Towers 
will be s^i ipped 
direct iQ you 
FREEo* 
shipping ca€t 




1M 



Amplifiers, HFWHFAJHF 
AMERITRON, etc. 



hiaxAi Vnrlf Pit\/'c largest stocking two way radio dealer 
iMew luriv wily b complete repair lab on premises 



BARRY ELECTRONICS CORP, 540 BROADWAY, NY, NY 1 001 2 iF^ve accks n. o( canai a between st»i>9 i Pr«e St.) FAX 21 2-925-7001 Phone 21 2-925-7000 

We stock: AEA, Alinco. Ameco, Ameritnon, Antenna Specialist, ARRU 
Astatic, Astrofi, B&.K Selden. Bencher. Bird. Bittemul, CES, Cushcfaft, 
Condan, Daiwa, Elmac, Her^ry Heil, HusUer, Hy-Gain, Icom, KLM, 
Kantronics, Kenwood, Larsen, Maxon, MFJ, Mirage, Motorola, Nye. 
Palomar, RF Products. Shore, Standard, TUBES & Tube Canons Uniden, 
Yaesu. VIbroflex, Dup lexers, Ftepealers, Scanners Radio Publications, 

WE NOW STOaC CDMHERCIAL COMMUHFCATIONS SYSTEMS 

HAM DEALEfi INQUIRES INVITED PHONE IN VOUR ORDER & BE REIMBURSED 

COMHERCIAL PtADIOt «teoli«4 ft ««rvle«d on promlM*. 

Amateur Radio Courses Given On Our Premises, Call 

Expert Or<f«rs Shfppeif Immedletety. 



"AquI Se Habia Espanol" 

BARRY INTERNATIONAL 

FAX 212-925-7001 Phone 212-925-7000 

For Orders Call 1-800-990-2929 

Monday-f riday 9 AM to 6 00 P.M. 
Satuniay 10- 5pm /Sunday 1 1- 2prn 

Subways: #6 Spring St. stop, N. tram ro Pnnoe St, 

F train to Houston St. 
Bus: Broadway bus 1o Prince St,, Path 9th St./6th Ave. 



CDMMERGiAl IIADIOS 

STOCKEOi ICOM, MotorO' 
la. MAXONh Standard. 
Yaesu, W& Serve mumci- 
palrties. tKisinesses, Ct^il 
Defense, etc Ponabtes. 
mobal«t, bases, te- 



ALL 
SALES 
FINAL 



Teolinioal h«lfi offered upon purchaM 



FAX: 212-925-7001 



CmCLE 41 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Review 



Number 6 an your 



ck card 



by John R. Bolduc NIQGS 



The Trident TR-1200 
Wide-Range 
Monitor Scanner 

Listen to the world with this compact little unit. 



Ace Communications 

10707 E, 106th Street 

Fishers IN 46038 

Telephone: (BOO) 445-7717 

Fax (BOO) 448-1084 

Price Class: $369 



Ifs lightweight, compact^ has a thousand 
channels, and can tune around the world. I 
am describing the TR-1200 model scanner 
from Trident This is not just a typical police 
scanner— this hand-held radio will pick up all 
sorts of things that are of interest to the ama- 
teur. The TR-1200 covers from 500 kHz up to 
1 300 f^Hz in three different modes: AM, FM 
wide, and FM narrow. The modes can be se- 
lected independent of the receive frequency. 
Scan and search steps range from 5 kHz to 
995 kHz. There are 10 memory banks wiih 
100 channels per bank. There are also 10 
search ranges that can be saved in memory. 
Power is provided by four supplied NiCd AA 
cells or a furnished 12 VDC power pack. 

hAy first impression of this radio was, 
"Wow, this is fight for its size." The unit tiJts 
my postal scale at just 11 ounces without bat- 
teries, and its dimensions are just 6-3/4* by 2- 
3/4" by 1-1/2". The Trident TR-12G0 is very 
similar to radios sold under the nameplates 
A.O.R,. Fainnate. Camnis and Yupiteru. 

My first lesson usjng the Trident was not to 
misplace the user's manual. Although pro- 
gramming the radio can be mastered, it tal^es 
some practice and some double-checking the 
manual The TR-1200 has many b©lls» whis- 
tles, and various fur>ctions. However they are 
not easily memorized, and having ihe manual 
handy during operation was usually neces- 
sary. After logging in on one of the more pop- 
ular on-fine computer servtees I learned that 
other users shared this opinion. In fact, sev- 



eral users of these radios have created wal- 
let-sized and full-sized function sheets to car- 
ry with them. 

So what does the TR-1200 have to offer 
the average ham? The Trident will tune to ev- 
ery amateur frequency below microwave, 
from the tong wavelength 160 meter band at 
1.S0O MHz Ihrough the 1240-1300 MHz ama- 
teur band. The tuning knob on the top of the 
radio makes it very easy to tune up or down a 
few kHz at a time for fine-tuning. One draw- 
back for the ham, however, is that single 
sideband mode reception is not available in 
this model. What this means is that below 29 
MHz there is limited amateur traffic thai the 
TR-1200 user will be able to monitor. Only 
traffic that is in the AM mode is intelligible. Of 
course, the majority of traffic here Is SSB or 
CW. If you want to pick up SS8 or CW, you 
either have to add a BFO or look to another 
radio. Trident is now offering a model that in- 
cludes a BFO. by the way. 

Scanning 

Scan banks can be scanned individually or 
in groups- For example, banks 2, 3 and 4 are 
programmed for fire; and banks 5 and 6 for 
the big NASCAR race. You may certainly 
scan all groups at once, but this means po- 
tentially scanning through 1,000 channels. 

While the casual user may have difficulty 
filling two or three banks of 100 channels, the 
seasoned scanner buff can find ways of filling 
1 ,000 channels, although it takes some effort. 



Scan Bank 
1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
3 
9 




Use 

Local rowns— police, fire, hospitals and local government for towns within 20 miles. 

Fire departments low band— 33 MHz arxl 46 MHz fire senrtces. 

Fire departments VHF high band — 154 MHz fire sefvices. 

Fire departmems UHF Ijand— 460-485 MHz fire service. 

Race track frequencies. 

Police— locals and State Polkje/Sherills for afl six New England states. 

Amaleur 29 MHz and above. 

HF/shortwave.'medium wave (AMI siaitons. 

Wife's (avonite FM and TV stalton audio. 

Research, including Federal Government and 800 MHz, 




Tabfe 1. 



Photo A, The Trident TR-1200 wide-range 
monitor scanner. 



24 73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 



Explore The World of Quorum Wefax 




Qum^i 



£1 



Wefax Explorer 

Ihtegraicd Wclax / AP 1 Receiver and Scan 
Converter with Qfax software. 

$695*00 complete 

shipping and taxes not included 

The Best Price I Performance. Period! 

Construct a Wefax / AFF reception system from individual compoRenl receivers, scan converters and image processing software 
and you'D spend more money for fewer features, poorer performance, no automation and a jungle of wires. With the Wefax 
Explorer, simply connect an antenna and a few mouse clicks later youVe receiving the highest quality images possible. The 
Explorer is backed by a 1 year limited warranty and the extensive experience of die leading Wefax hardware manufacturer, 
Quoimn equipment is used by virtually all wet^ supphers in worldwide amateur, commercial and military systems. 



9 1 mw ii 






1 


■ 


■ 


1 


^^^^^^^^^^B 




W' ■ 


^- H-. 


.,. II 




!___-■ 





II i: 



1 44 I 

■lilL>i>:l 



l-i-y I 



ID 



i 



lt*lr** . « 



jl, fn t" 



|jjfr 'fffr «-^ * I ' 



JWaFg- 



irf 



^i^^^^H 




- — .^^i^— *. ^^^mm^^ 


.J 


1 .. .,_ 1 


■ 





Integrated Satellite visihilUy pre^ 
diction with automatic capture for 
up to 8 satellites simultaneously 

Automatic time and ephemeris 
stamping far navigation 

2 7 day progratmnable schmiulers 

Automatic digital gain lock in 
ALL modes f PLL clocking 



QFAX Features 

I GOES / Meteosat Wefax Reception 

1 NOAA / Meteor APT Reception 

I HF Naf ax Reception 

I Dual RF ports for geosync and polar 
reception under software control 

I Integrated preamp and down con- 
verter power inserters 

I 50 user definable configurations 

I Software controlled receiver with 2 
UHFf 10 VHF memories and scan 

I On botMrd audio amplifier and 
speaker with software controlled voU 
ume, squelch and mute 

I Automatic Unattended Animation 
works continuously 

I 8 bit data for up to 256 gray levels 

I View at up to 1280 x 1024 256 color 

( Use TIFF, GIF or PCX pe formats 
and convert to BMP, JPEG, EPS 
and binary 

Contrast^ Brightness^ 3D effect. 
Sharpen^ Smooth, Noise, Histo* 
grams and other image processing 




Ephemeris based NOAA APT navi- 
gation with geo-political and Ijat- 
Lon overlays 

NOAA Tools show satellite path, 
Lat-tjm of cursor, distance and 
bearing to reference paint 

Automatic Temperature Calibration 

Color Palettes and NOAA curves 



Quorum Communications, Inc. fax(214) 915(1270 

S3<M Esters BJvd. - Suite 850 - Irving, Texas 75063 (214) 915-0256 BBS (214) 915-0346 



CIRCLE 2Sr ON READER SERVICE CARD 



n 



Search Bank 


Range 


Search Step 


Mode 


Use 


1 


33.440-33.980 MHz 


20 kHz 


FM narmw 


Low band 33 MHz lire 


2 


46.06(M5-500 MHz 


20 kHz 


FM narrow 


\jysn band 46 MHz fire 


3 


44.78<M5.460 MHz 


20 kHz 


FM narrc^w 


New HampshiTo Slate Police 


4 


462.550-462.725 MHz 


12.5 kHz 


FM narrow 


General mobile radk) service {non4>usJrBSs) 


1 5 


146-400-147 400 MHz 


15 kHz 


FM narrow 


2 meter amaleyr 


6 


80.100-107,900 MHz 


200 kHz 


FM wKlG 


FM broacJcast 


7 


118,000-136.000 MHz 


25 kHz 


AM 


Commercial/privaie aircraft 


8 


225. 000^00.000 MHz 


50 kHz 


AM 


Mil ilary aircraft 


9 


153.770^154.445 MHz 


15 kHz 


HJi narrow 


Local fifG deparlment 





460.025-460.500 MHz 


25 kHz 


FM narrow 


Bosion MA police 



33.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.25 mV 


44.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.20 mV 


54.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.43 mV 


146 00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.27 mV 


156.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


,35 uV 


166 00 MHz 


FM narrow 


,35 pV 


408 00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.98 pV 


450.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.75 mV 


460.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.50 mV 


470.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


,60 uV 


490.00 MHz 


FM narrow 


.75 mV 


856.00 MHz 


FM r^rfOw 


,35 jjV 



Tabte a 

Table 1 shows how I filled the 10 banks. Not 
all 100 channels need to be programmed in 
each bank. Unprogrammed channels are not 
scanned. 

I do not actyally scan banks 8 and 9. as 
these services have a constant signal that 
would haJI scanning. For these banks 1 use 



Table 2. 

the direct access to channel feature to select 
the desired channel. 

Search Banks can be sel up slightly differ- 
ently. See Table 2. 

Sensitivity specs were measured on an 
IFR Model 500A communications analyzer, 
^ee laLJie o- 

Note how some frequencies are much 
more sensitive than others. In some areas 
the radio seemed hot sensitivity-wise. In oth- 
er areas the radio provided less sensitivity. 
Actual field usage replicated bench testing. I 
realize that covering such an enormous 
chunk of frequencies is probably achieved 
with some compromise. However, some of 
the sensitivity drop-offs occurred in ranges 
where I find some interesting listening and re- 
searching Hams may note the 408-450 MHz 
and 6 meter sensitivity as well. The scan and 
search rates are tioth approximately 20 chan- 
nels per second* 



The user's manual states that the supplied 
antenna was not intended for shortwave or 
broadcast band reception. I did find that 
many stations in the 49 meter band were still 
easy to hear with this rubt>er dudk. Substitut- 
ing a long piece of wire stuck in the BNC an- 
tenna jack as suggested by the user's manu- 
al provided a great number of stations for lis- 
tening. This is enticing to the shortwave lis- 
tener who enjoys the standard broadcast tare 
in the AM mode. 

The user's manual is quite detailed. It ap- 
pears to be written by an individual or individ- 
uals who genuinely want the user to under- 
stand how to use the radio. In some cases 
fewer words could have adequately de- 
scribed the functions. The manual I received 
with the radio appears to be a preliminary 
version, as some of the paragraphs were in- 
complete. [Manufacturer's Note: This has 
now been ojrrectedj The paper and ink used 



:.»«. 



The NEW PacComm PicoPacket 



Compact! Only i" x 2.5" x 3". An 
inch sht)rter Uian a pack of ciga- 
rettes- 

Fiiwerf uJ! Z- 1 8 1 liigh integration 
MPU with one megabyte address 
space. A real piiwerhuuse. 

Inexpensive! Unly US$129 (32k 
i<AM model). 

I Perfect Beginner *s TNC! Every 
leature you would expect in a 
nortiial size" AX25 120() baud 
TNC. plus: 

On-Line HELP! So easv to leam! 
7ypt^ Help and a command name (or 
pan ot a command name) and re- 
ceive the correct spelling, shortest 
abbreviation, deluult value(s), ac- 
ceptable values, and a short explana- 
tion of its function. 



Terminal programs for both DOS 
and Windows^^ included. 

Personal Message System v^/ith all 
the state-of-the-art features. 

APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting 
System) compatible comprehensive 
GPS support built-in. 



EPROM and RAM are sock- 
eted for ease in upgrading firm- 
ware and increasing memory. 

RJ-4? serial cable with adapter 
to I )h-9S. RJ-45 radio cable has 
real wire - st>lders easily to radio 
connecitirs. 

Instruction manual, schematic. 
Quick Command listing* pi>wer 
cord included. 

Options 

12Xkor5i2kRAM, 

hull -time GPS pon (second serial 
port) with real-time clock and 128k. 

Mating GPS receiver. A TVimble 
SVeeSix-CM2 receiver fits in a sep- 
arate case the same size as the Pico 
and attaches via an audio stereo 
cable. 



PacComm Packet Radio Systems, Inc. 

4413 N. Hesperides St., Tampa. FL 33614-7618 
+(8 1 3 ) 874^298(1 Facsmiile: M « 1 3 » 872-8696 
BBS: -«-(8I3) 874-3078 CompuServe: 76576.2(H)3 Internet: email te^ pace ommxom 

Orders & Catalog Requests : t8(K)) 486-7388 (24 hour voice mail* 



CHICLE 152 ON READER SEfiVlCE CARD 



26 73 AmatQur Radio Today • May, 1 995 







325aP £1S.9S 




4C7SH $27.9S 

Hardcov^i" 



M^ 


,.,,'.ii T..r>^fcBiijj 1^1 




- 


- 


A 



D30«3S2 $11.»S 



RADIO 

eEC£IVf^PI?OJECTSj 




42SeP $114^ 



TRANSMlTTEIt 
HUNTING 

RAtMO DIUCTiON 




ZTVIP »t«JS 



DIGITAL 











ANTOTslA 

eSTQNEERNG 



UII737S ta4.«S 



43HJ> $1«,M 



CoufHS as Z/HoinctDDver 



5MS37a SiSiftS 



w nrAxriooEOf 
PRO}ECTS 



Buitd Youf Own 



HORTW 

ANTENNAS 




G5t7!2fifi ITUa 






taOTF 123.95 






03a2S4«-XX $6090 



** *. 








^^^b2^ 




07&534O St&J£ 






13 I' ;- M i ■ w #^.l ftt ^L.'^.j^ •«'N-««P«fl«.=^^ 




H coupon r» nii$3ifi.g, write to Bvctronks Boo^ Club. A 0(vt$iOf^ erf McGr3w4iilt Blue Ridge SiMHIkit. PA 17Z94-0dt0 



^ 



As a member of 

the Electronics Book Club 

you It enjoy r€?cervrng Ciub bulletins ev^ry 3-4 \ 
Wp^ks that contain excili ng off(?rE on the. fates! books :J 
id the fteld— at savings up to 50% off regular i 
pubNsheis^ prices. If you want ihe Main Seieciion, 
do nothing, \\ wHI be sfiipped automatically, W youjg| 
want anoHier book, or no book at all. s»mp^y ro'urnW 
llie repty ■oi^ by the date specified II you ev^r 
fieceive a book you doft't want due to tate deHver^ 
ol the News, you can return it at otrr expense Vbu'l^ 
have ai reasi 10 days to decide, Pius yotj il 
automat?i^ry be elfgible for FREE BOOKS through 
the Bonus Book Program. Your only obligation is lo . 
purchase 3 more booKs during the ne?(t t2 months, 
aftef which- you nay can-cef your membership aL^ 
any time. ™ 

Publishers' prices a howrt All book? are aoftcover uril&&sother^rtff3fl 
nottd. i)- you aeJeci d book that counts as 2 choices, write th-e book 
nurribeir in one boK ftrid XX In the next If you %s^^<^ a book thar coufiis 
as 3c}i0iv9S= write th& boolt number tn one tnox and XXK in 1I19 n#jti 
2 bones. A s^hpping/nandMng charge & $»le^ lax will bs added to all 



Your most complete and 

comprehensfve source for 

the finest electronics books 



= ETeCtrOniCS a Division ot McGraw-HIIU Inc. 
^.DOOk Clut) Blue Ridge Symmat. PA 17294-0810 

i! Please send me the 5 books listed below, lor S4,95 plus shippjngyhandling £1 tax, and enroll me 
as a member of the Etectranlcs Book Club accordmg to the terms oulFlned in this ad. It not satisfied, 
I may return the books within ten days withoui obligation and have my membership cancelled 



If you select 3 booK thai coimts as 2 dioi-tei, Affile me &ook numbflf m one go* a/Jd" XX m ihe n#Kt. 
H ylHi $?ttiHct a boo^ ihai counts as 3 ctuqices^ wrtie ih? tKK>k nuwibar in Qn« ben and XXX m lh# noxt 2 boK)^ 



^ Bill m$ (FREE book ncn avaUabte with thi£ payment ^ion.)> 

EI YES! I want the extra book indicated at ngm My introductory paymeni 
of $4j95 pMiiS S4S5 shipping/narKJiing' and a^^icaPI^ sale? tax '\& sficlOiSed. 

E Chack Of money order enclosed payable to: MeGraw-Hifl, Inc. 

Zl Please charge my D VISA ~1 MasterCard i_ American Express :J Discover 



BOOK 




Acct.# 
Name 



.Exp. Date 



Signature 



(raQuin^d on ^11 Cf&dN card orders} 



City. 



Phone 



Address ^ 

State/Zip 

UatK3 tot ntH mtmbtfrs ofi}y. stdi^Kt to ftcc«pian(» by ESC. US dnlBra irt ^U p pftl -iin Ctfe» Book Pe»si. Appflctmt outiidB' the US 
and Caj^AOi itii m/amum ^psdM qrdaring ma»\jKSmm. CanadA mistmntt ^ U S tanm ^imn on HM- bante ^CvtaOimt flnlws v« 
tft^ipea smt^nationil Soofe ftwl wtcf fSLSft iMgifiingAiifiilIng, A iMpprng.' hamaiLrtg [i^Mifog & ui^ tH »■ b* H4HI le tf ««denL 

STAft595 



in the printing of the manual were of low qual- 
ity. After walking for about 10 seconds in a 
snow shower with the manual exposed, the 
ink on the cover and an inside page ran con- 
siderably. 

Speaker Aodto 

As With virtually all hand-held radios, I 
found the speaker output to be only sufftcient 
in situations with litlle or no background 
noitf^ It was inadequate in situations such as 
at ftm scenes or driving fn a car. While show- 
ing the radio around at a party I had to pull 
people into a separate room to dearly hear 
the radio traffic. Turning the volume knob be* 
yond two'thirds of full range didn't ■ 
seem to help. 



Tunfng knob placed wfthfn easy reach on 
top of the scanner This is particularly useful 
for fine-tuning stations in bands wilh nonstan- 
dard channel spacing. I found the tuning knob 
particularly useful in the HF bands. 

Keyboard lock. Located on the front pan- 
el, it has a raised tip around it. This handy 
button will lock afl other keyboard buttons, I 
use this feature when I'm at a fire scene fid- 
dling with my camera and I don t want to acci- 
dentally change the setting on the radio. 

Display backlight. Pushing this button 
turns on the weH-illuminating backlight for the 
display for about six seconds. I did find its us- 
ability a little irritating. I find that six seconds 



Features and Accessories 



Rubber ducky antenna, which 
looks exactly like a Yaesu dual- 
band rubber ducky This antenna 
performs well on VHF high band ^"^ 
(144-174 MHz) and UHF (440-470 MHz). 
However, as with most rubber ducks, perfor- 
mance is poor on VHP low band. 

Batteries— four factory-provided NiCd 
rechargeable cells, Thefr performance was 
fair compared wilh brand-name NiCds. As 
with all NICds supplied with electronic gad- 
gets, a lengthy initial charge of about 14 
hours was necessary. 

AC power adapter for charging and listen- 
ing to radio. This performed well 

DC/car cigarette lighter plug. This per- 
formed welL 

Earphone— your standard monauial ear- 
phone. 

Garrymg strap. 

Beft clip. I did use this. 

Vinyl case. The majority of the front of the 
case Is of clear vinyl through which all keys 
are easy to access „ The case actually took 
some fairly abusive treatment and came 
through surprisingly well. 

Keys, kfiobs and switches. 



in order to keep the comparison as 

fair as possible I used ttie supplied 

rubber ducf< antenna for both the 

Trident and my own scanners." 



is not always adequate time for programming 
in the dark. Holding the button in will not keep 
the backlight illuminated. Pushing the button 
before the backlight goes out will extinguish 
the light. Having Illuminated keys would be a 
plus. 

Comparison 

The Trident TR-1200 is a near clone of the 
A. OR, AR1000XLT less 800 MHz cellular 
radio phone coverage. 

I found it necessary to evaluate the 
TR-1200 using two different criteria. One was 
using the radio by itself on a weekend stay in 
coastal Maine. Since this area was relatively 
untried turf for my monitoring, I did not have 
any major expectations of what I should be 
hearing. The TR-1200 was tun lo use once 
all the desired frequencies were entered into 
the many channels and search groups. It 
performed admirably in the presence of my 
relatives, although they were a bit befuddted 
by the steps necessary to program ihe radio. 



I was satisfied with its ability to hear police 
and fire departments for 40 miles up and 
down the coast using just the rubber ducky. 
AM broadcast band reception, however was 
dismal, even with a very long piece of wire as 
an antenna. TV and FM broadcasl stations in 
the region all came in well. The AM civilian 
aircraft band did not receive much until I got 
within five miles of the Portland, Maine, Jet- 
port. 

At a major shopping mall I attempted to 
seek out the mall's security channel, Having 
been inside the mall, I determined that securi- 
ty/maintenance was using UHF handie- 
talkies. My confidence in my ability to pro- 
^^ gram search functions without the 
manual was dealt a blow, as it took 
me a good 10 minutes of button- 
pushing to get things right. In less 
time tfian it took me to find the cor- 
rect function key pattern I had 
found the Maine Mali frequency. 
^^~ The second criterion I used was 

side-by-srde comparison with three other ra- 
dios I own. This was a somewhat unfair com- 
parison , since it took three radfos to compare 
to this one Trident. The radios I used were a 
Realistic 2006 base scanner, a Regency 
HX1000 hand-held scanner, and a Yaesu 
FRG-7 communications receiver Compared 
to other radios I own, the TR-1200 does more 
than any one of them alone. However in 
many cases the TR-1200's performance is 
less, in common coverage areas, than the 
other radios'. In order to keep the comparison 
as fair as possible I used the supplied rubber 
duck antenna for both the Trident and my 
own scanners. 

Overall impressions 

Ifs fun to listen to, but a minor challenge to 
master, The biggest plus: My spouse likes to 
use it. My biggest dislike: It needs more scan 
banks, with fewer channels per bank. For the 
price it is lough to match the coverage of the 
Trident TR-1200. 





l^ilT •!• A 



Dealers for Kenwood, Yaesu, Icom, 

Cushcraft, AEA, Kantronicss, 

Bencher, Diamond, Astro n, MPJ, 

Hustler, Ameritron. Larsen, ARRL, 

and more,„ 
Service is also available, 

Gei jmir Aeat prke 
£fteo asU U3 LAST!! 

(801) 567-9494 - (800) 942-8873 

7946 South State Street 

Midvale, UT 84047 



COMTELCO 



tNDUSTBIBS 



i 





Dual Band 

Mobile 

Antenna 

140 MHz, 440 MHz 

MAGNET MOUNT $21.95 

150 watt 12ft RG5S + connector 

PERMANENT MOUNT tZiJSO 

with HMO'TAD mount 17tt RGSS 

BNC Of PL259 connectOf 

DB02 QUPLEXER $49.00 

UHF coimectcKS 8' leads 

Add 3,50 5&H 

1 •BOOt-634-4622 

COMTELCO tNDUSmiES, INC. 
501 Mitchell Rd.. Glendale Hts.. IL 60139 



W 




CIRCLE 156 ON R{=ADER SERVEC£ CARD 



BATTERIES 

Nickel Cadmium, AlkaHne, Lithium, 
Sealad Lead Acid For Radios, Computers, 
Etc. And All Portable Equipment 

YOU NEED BATTERIES? 
WE*VE GOT BATTERIES! 

CALL US FOR FREE CATALOG 




E.H. YOST & CO, 

2211 DPARVIEWRD. 
MIDDLETON, Wl 5^562 

PHONE 608-831-3434 
FAX 606-831-1062 






CIRCLE 15 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE 1 14 OK READER SERVICE CARD 



28 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1 995 



MFJ super DSF filter 

, . . Tunable "brick wall" bandpass, lowpass, highpass, notch, SSB, CW filters . . . 
programmable preset filters . . . automatic multiple notch filter eliminates heterodynes 
. . - adaptive noise reduction reduces noise and QRN , , . for Voice, CW, Data . . . 



Only MFJ gives you jp 

tunable and programmable 
"brick wall" DSP /titers 



$ 



MFJ-784 



219 



95 




MF J's super DSP filter 

automatically emninates heterodynes^ 
reduces noLse and interference 
simultaneously on SSB^ AM, CW, 
packet, AMTOR, FACTOR, RTTY, 
SSTV, WeFAX, BAX, weak signal VHF, 
EME^ satellite - nearly any mode you1l 
ever encounter. 

You get MFJ's tunable FCR linear 
phase filters that minimize ringing, 
prevent data errors and have '* brick 
wair* filter response with up to 60 dB 
attenuation just 75 Hz away, 

Only MFJ gives you 5 tunable DSP 
Alters. You can tune each lowpass^ 
highpass, notch, and bandpass filter 
including optimized SSB and CW 
filters. You can vary bandwidth to 
pinpoint and eliminate interference. 

Only MFJ gives you 5 factory pre-set 
filters and 10 programmable p re-set 
I niters that you can customize* Instantly 
remove QRM with a turn of a switch! 

You get MFJ's automatic notch filter 

that searches for and eliminates 
multiple heterodynes. 

You abo get MFJ's advanced adaptive 
noise reduction. It silences background 
noise and QRN so much that S^B 
signals sound like a local FM repeater 

The automatic notch and adaptive 
noise reduction can be used with all 
relevant tunable and pre-set filters. 

AuUomaik gain control (AGO keeps 
audio level constant during signal fading. 

Automatic notch filter 

MFJ*s automatic notch filter searches 

for and eliminates multiple heterodynes. It's 
mi7/f-second fast ~ interfering CW and 
RTTY signals are also eliminated. 

Voice signals aren't degraded because the 
notch is extremely narrow. 

With up to 50 dB attenuation, you'll copy 
stations otherwise masked by heterodynes, 
miss fewer calls and be less exhausted. 

Leave the automatic notch filter on 
during a phone contest and you'll never hear 
unwanted heterodynes of luner-uppers. 

Yon can selectively remove tones. Say, 
you're on CW and a couple of annoying CW 
stations appear nearby. You can use the t\m 
nnanually tunable notch filters -- an MFJ 
exclusive — to completely knock them out. 



Adaptive noise reduction 

Turning on noise reduction silences 
background noise. Noisy SSB, FM» AM, 

CW and Data signals become readable. 

Noise reduction works in all filter modes 
and on all random noise - white noise, 
impulse noise, static, ignition noise, power 
Une noise, hiss and atmospheric noise. 

The LMS algorithm gives you up to 20 
dB of noise reduction. Noise reduction is 
adjustable to prevent signal distortion. 

Reducing random noise reduces fatigue, 
especially when the band is noisy. 

Tunable highpass/lowpass filters 

For Voice and Data, nothing beats MFI's 
exclusive tunable highpass/lowpass FIR 
linear phase "brick wall" filters. 

You can tune the lower cutoff frequency 
200 to 2200 HZ and the upper cutoff 
frequency 1400 to 3400 Hz. 

Signals J w^^ 75 Hz away litemlly disappear 
— they are reduced a thousand times, 60 dB! 

Unlike other filters, speech clarity is not 
redtjced by envelope distortion caused by 
unequaJ fime delay. 

By adjusting the highpass and lowpass 
filters you can create custom filters for 
Voice, Data and other modes. 

When signals are weak, you can improve 
copy by removing high and low speech 
frequencies. They contain little information 
but are full of noise that reduce readability. 

On crowded HP bands, overlapping SSB 
signals make copying difficult. You can 
improve copy by slicing off some overlap 
with razor sharp "brick wall" responses. 

You cm\ also highpass filler out hura, pulses, 
rasp and other irritating low frequency noise. 

Tunable bandpass filtei^ 

Narrow band signals like CW and RTTY 

jump out of QRM when you switch in an MEJ 
tunable FIR bandpass filters. 

You can tune the center frequency from 
300 to 3400 Hz. And vary the bandwidth 
from 30 Hz to 2100 Hz — from super light 
CW fillers to wide razor-sharp Data filters. 

As you namow tf^ bandwidth, interfering 
signals drop out, because, just 60 Hz away, 
they're down by over 50 dB. 

You can use narrower bandwidths to fight 
tough QRM b^ausc these linear phase filters 
don't distort signals with unequal time delays. 

Even with the nairowesi 30 Hz bandwidth, 



youll never have a problem with ringing. 

One position gives you fivo tunable filters 
you can use together on one signal. For 
example, on RTTY, tune one filter to mark, 
the other to space and set the bandwidth tight 
for an incredibly sharp RTTY filter. 

15 pre^set filters -- use factory set 
or program your own 

You can select from fifteen convenient 
preset filters. Use them for SSB, AM, CW, 
packet, AMTOR. Ri\CTOR, RTTY, SSTV, 
WeFAX FAX or any mode you can think of. 

If you donl like our pre -set filters^ you can 
program your own — an MFJ exclusive! Save 
center frequency/bandwidth, lowpass/highpass 
cutoffs, auto/manual notch and noise reduction 
—all filter settings— in \0 programmable filters. 

Only MFJ gives you the best of both 
worlds " tunable filters to eliminate nearly 
any QRM and fast conv^nieni preset fillers 
customized, for any mode. 

Plus more , . . 

A push-button bypasses your filter — lets 
you hear the entire unfiltered signal. 

Built-in two watt amplifier. Has volume 
control, input level control, speaker jack, 
headphone jack, accessory jack. FTT line and 
PTT sense and line level oulput, 9x2^2x6 in. 

It plugs between your transceiver or receiver 
and external speaker or headphones. Use 12 
VDC or 1 10 VAC with MFJ-13I5, S14,95. 

No Matter Wliat"* guarantee 

You get MFJ's famous one year No Matter 
What"" unconditional guarantee. That means 
we will repair or replace (at our option) your 
MFJ-784 no matter what for a full year. 

Call your dealer for your best price 
Automatically eliminate heterodynes. 

reduce noise and QRM on Vciice, CW and Data- 
Call your favorite dealer for your best price and 
order your MFJ super DSP filler today t 



Free MFJ Catalog 

Write or call toll-free . , . 800-647-1800 



Nearest Dealer/Orders: 800-647*1800 
Technical Help: 800-647-TECH (8324) 

• 1 y^ar uncondttmnd guarantee » 30 day money tsdc 
guararttee (less s/h) on ofdeiB Irom MFJ ■ free catalog 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC 

Box 494, Miss. State. MS 39762 

\m\) 323-5869; 8-4:30 CST, Mcj^Fri 

FAX; (601) 323-655 \ ; Add %% s/h 

Pf (ces and si>eciricailofis aubject to change (D /4»^ MFJ Enarpmes. im. 




MFJ . . . making quality affordable 



CilCLE U ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Review 



Number 7 art your Feedback cant 



by Jeff M. Gold AC4HF 



Oak Hills RGSGarch 

20679 Madison Street 

Big Rapids Ml 49307 

Tetephone: (616) 796-1460 

Price Class: $129.95 



The Oak Hills 

Explorer Kit 

Build a fun, inexpensive and high quality CW rig, 



Ham radk) is a great hobby, Tliere are al- 
ways new frontiers lo explore and new 
things to learn. Of alf the thfilts I have had 
wrih the hobby, the greatest has been firing 
up a rig I built myself and then actually get- 
ting to talk to someone on it. The excitement 
seems to be there every time* I have many 
commercial and kit-built rigs on my bench. 
The commercial rigs seem lo sit for tong pe- 
riods of time while the ones I have built gat 
alt the use. ^ 

I always wanted to build radios. 
When y was a teenager I remember 
dreaming atJOUt building a Heathkit. I 
didn't have anyone lo he(p me get into 
the hobby, so the dream sat Idly for 
years. After getting my ham license ^ 
and then using commercial equipment for a 
year, I decided it was tinne to build some* 
thing. By the time \ got to order, Heathkit 
was just going out of the kit business. I was 
fortunate enough to have access to the In- 
ternet (worldwide network of computer net- 
works) and posted a message that was 
heard around the worid. asking if anyone slil! 



had an un-burlt HW9. \ wasn't reafly sure 
what QRP was. but this was the only tisting 
for a kit that \ might be able to afford. 

I finally found an un-built HW9 kit from a 
ham who knew a friend who had purchased 
a few of them at the Dayton Hamfest. I sent 
a money order and waited (although not too 
patiently.) When the kit came I unpacked it 
slowly and was a little overwhelmed by the 
number of parts. I read through the insiruc- 



u 



Today, I stHt get this excited about 
buitding kits even after buiiding 
about every kit on fhe market " 



tions in the front of the very thick manual 

I did manage over a long period of lime to 
assemble all the parts very carefully. The big 
day finally came. Heath was very good 
about including a couple of pages of tests to 
do before you actually put any power on the 
kit. This can save many a project from dam- 
age. My HW9 passed all these tests, so it 




P^iofo A. The Expforer kit in progress. 



was time for the power-on tests and afign- 
ment procedures, i carefully hooked up the 
power and very nervously turned on the 
power supply, I almost jumped back, expect- 
ing fire and explosions. I was so happy that 
it didn't bum up that I let out a scream that 
about scared my wife and son out of their 
socks. Today, I still get this excited about 
building kits even after building about every 
kit on the market. 

^. I woutd not recommend a kit that 

Is this fnvotved for a first pro|ect- To 
pick a project, you need to decide 
whether to build a transmitter, receiv- 
er, transmitter/receiver combination 
or transceiver. To learn more about 
■*™ the way things work, you may want 
to start building the individual station parts 
and then put them together to form an oper- 
ating station. 

An important consideration is the type of 
receiver that is incorporated in the kit. The 
two types that are in most of the kits are Di- 
rect Conversion (DC) and Superheterodyne. 
The DC receivers are simpler to build but 
have some limitations. With a DC the receiv- 
er picks up signal energy from above and 
below a given frequency equally well. For in- 
stance, if you are tuning a station that is on 
7.040 ^ as you tune up the band the signal 
will get stronger until you reach a point 
where it seems to disappear. This is the cen- 
ter frequency or "zero bear frequency. As 
you tune immediately past it ihe signal will 
once again become strong and then begin to 
weaken. If there is much noise on the band 
from other stations (QRM). the noise can 
seem worse than it really Is, The DC receiv- 
er can also become overioaded from com- 
mercial AM broadcast stations. This doesn't 
mean that this type of rig can't work well, but 
you will need to get used to tuning in a sig- 
nal using a DC receiver. An advantage of 
this design is that the rig can be made very 
small and lightweight and can be sold for a 
very reasonable price. If you are planning to 
use the rig for portable or backpacking use, 
ttiis may be a good choice. 

After building many kits, I recommend a 
good single-signal transceiver kit with a sta- 
ble VFO (after your rig warms up initially it 



30 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



4 PORT REPEATER AND 
LINK CONTROLLER 



AMATEUR TELEVISION 




FEATURES: 

• 4-ful] dypicjt ladio pofU 

• optional Autopatch available 
- UoiqUfr Oh' for each port 

• DTMF conirol from any port 
■ too user command macros 

• 300-9600 baud serial pon 

• 4-141X0- board construction 

• Priced for any groups budget 



RLC-4 REPEATER CONTROLLER 

Benefits: 

With DTNff and serial progmraimng features* your coniroller 

is more secure from unwanted access. Use only 1 coiiiroUer at 

your site to control up to 4 separate repeaters/links with their 
own personalities and features intacL Make emergency 
autopaich calls with the telephone option. Only the RLC-4 can 
make these features available at such a low price. 

ONLY $375.00 




Link Communications, Ine. 

1 15 2nd Ave. N.R, Sidney, MT 59270 

CMl for LnfomiatDii about our compklc line of conDxillers 

See Us At Dayton Booth #354 



anCLE 47 ON f^EADER SERVICE CAHO 




Made in USA On\y $89 



SEE THE SPACE SHUTTLE VIDEO 

Many ATV repeaters and individuals are retransmitting 
Space Shuttle Video & Audio from their TVRO's tuned to 
Spacenel 2 transponder 9 or weather radar during signifi- 
cant storms, as well as home camcorder video. If it's being 
done in your area on 420 - check page 501 in the 94-95 
ARRL Repeater Directory or calf us, ATV repeaters are 
springing up all over - all you need is one of the TVC-4G 
ATV 420450 MHz downconveters. add any TV set to ch 2, 
3 or 4 and a 70 CM antenna (you can use your 435 Oscar 
antenna). We also have ATV downconverters, antennas, 
transmitters and ampliliers for the 400, 900 and 1 200 MHz 
bands. In fact we are your one stop for all your ATV needs 
and info. V^e ship most items within 24 hours after you calL 
Hams, call for our complete 10 page ATV catalogue. 



(818) 447-4565 m4 aam*5:30pm pst. 

P-C- ELECTRONICS 

2522 Paxson Ln Arcadia CA 91007 



Vim, MC, COD 

Tom (W60RG) 
Maryann [WB6YSS} 






« 



I 




NOW $47+9 



NOW H9^ 



FNB-ll Yaesu 12v SOOmah 



siso NOW S40« 



FNB-26S Yaesu 7.2v 1400mah ?w NOW ^48^ 



CNB-152 Standard/Heath 12v 600mali Sso NOW *44^'' 



mim cm for detam m our completi line of repucement b atferies 

Offei good thru June 199S, 



NEW REPUCEMENT BATTERY PACKS 



IWft'OOD; TH-22/42/7$A PB^IJ 6v I200mah 

FB-34 9.6v fiOOmili 

TH-27/47, m-2Bmm 

pa-ni2vS00mab 
YAESU: Fr-HR/41R 

FNB'3fi9.5v600roifa 

BP'l32 l2v60Qmah 
BM32A12v600nmh 



S49^QQ 
S49,95 

i5J.2S 

166.90 



^tllllllH* 



peraPHGXinc. 

the only thing low about our charge is the cost... 

Order ToU Free (800) 6348132 



$54. 



We aiso supply: CamcOTdfl- Batteries 

Accesisories 



Lordless nione Bancns 
Custom Batter\- l^acks 



Lithium Ulk 




iJ 300 Centre street •Holbrook,\L\ 02343 '(617) 767-5516 • Fax (617) 7674S99 



aRCLE €8 ON READER SERViCE CARD 

73 AmatBur Radio Today • May, 1 995 31 



^a^^ 



will remain on the san^e frequency without 
drifting). The Explorer from Oak Hills Re- 
search makes an excellent beginners' pro- 
ject. I have had a great deal of success with 
Oak Hills Research kits and have buttt about 
everything ihey have produced. 

The Oak Hills Exptorer 

The Explorer is a single-band superhet 
transceiver for 80, 40, 30 or 20 meters. De- 
pending on the time of year or the ttme of 
the day you like to operate, any one of these 
bands is a good choice. Each band has a 
slightly different personality. 

In my opinion. 20 meters is best for low- 
powered DXing and a little harder to rag* 
chew; 30 meters and 80 meters are both 
good rag-chewing bands: and 40 meters can 
have some good DX and some good rag- 
chewing— it's usually pretty busy and It is 
easy to find someone to talk to on it. 

The Explorer kit has a very stable VFO 
circuit with a vernier dial that pro- ^^^_ 
vides 100 kHz of coverage (50 
kHz on 30m). The hg has an BIT 
circuit that provides +/- 1.5 kHz of 
range. The radio also has a four- 
poJe crystal ladder fitter, an AGC ^ 

circuit, a sidetone oscillator with 
level control, and an excellent solid-state 
QSK circuit. My rig puts out a solid 3 watts of 
power The rig draws 50 mA on RX and 450 
mA on TX. 

This kit has only one printed circuit board. 
It is doubte-sided with plated-through holes 
and the solder side is solder-masked to help 
prevent sokler bridges. The two main prob- 
lems new and oid builders have are that they 
accidentally get solder on the board, causing 
a connection that isn't supposed to be there, 
or they put a part in the wrong place. The 
board that comes with this kit makes i1 easy 
not to get solder bridges, and the silk- 
screening is of such good quality that it real- 
ly helps you get the parts in the right place. 

The third thing that reafly helps eliminate 
building problems is the excellent, clear 
instructions that come with the kit. There are 
step-by-step instmctions and very nk;e dia- 
grams. There are no wire jumpers on the 
boards which is a nice feature. Many begin- 
ning kit builders find it hard to wind coils. All 
the coifs come nicely pre-wound, packaged 
separately and clearly labeled. There were 
many details in this kit that made building a 
real pleasure. 



Building the Kit 

If you are a new builder there are some 
tips on building you should keep in mind. 
You should be careful when you open the 
box. There may be pieces or instructions 
that are hidden In the protective packing. It 
isn*t much fun to accidentally throw away 
parts that you wfll need to complete your 
project. 

The first thing to do is read the instruc- 
tions and see if they sound like they will be 
easy to foltow. TTie Oak Hills instructions are 
some of the best I have ever come across. 
They have a section that gives good solder- 



ing tips and tips that will hetp make bulding 
the rig more fun. 

The instructions call for you to check and 
ensure that all the parts have been included, 
I first check off all the parts and label them 
on a piece of paper and stick the wires of the 
components through the paper. This gives 
me a chance to make sore all the parts have 
been Included, familiarizes me with the 
parts, and gives me a double-check about 
putting the correct parts in the right botes on 
the board. I check the parts once while I am 
going through the check-off list and then 
again before I place them on the tx>ard. This 
helps eliminate one of the two biggest enrors 
in kit building: putting a part in the wrong 
place on the printed circuit board. While I am 
sorting parts Ihat are small and hard to iden- 
tify, I use a lighted magnifying glass (Radio 
Shack 63-848). I put about five parts on the 
circuit board at a time, then solder all the 
leads and clip the ends close to the board. 



/t was a real pleasure after a hard day 

of work to let my mind relax and just 

sit down and build. '* 



For tC chips I usually place each socket on 
the board, one at a time, 

I have some soldering suggestions as 
well, Use only good rosin core solder and 
use a soldering Iron that has a nice thin pen- 
cil tip and is 25 or 30 watts. Oak Hills Re- 
search recommends 25 watts, but I use a 
30-wart iron for all my building. Make sure 
the tip of the iron is pointed and clean. I 
have also found that having desoldering 
braid (Radio Shack 64-2090) is helpful if you 
put a part in the wrong place or accidentally 
solder things together (a solder bridge). 
When soldering plated-through boards, a 
desoldering tool (Radio Shack 64-2120) is 
very helpful The key to soldering Is how and 
where to hold the soldering iron. Hold the 
soldering iron at about a 45-degree angle 
and make sure you are heating botti the hole 
and the wire from the component. Take the 
solder and have it in your opposite hand 
from the iron and on the opposite side of Ihe 
hole from the soldering iron. Allow the heat 
from the iron to cause the solder to melt. 
Don't take the solder and let W flow off the 
iron as many people do. If you allow the sol- 
der to flow off the iron and not heat the 
whole soldering joint the component may not 
really be electrically connected to the place it 
is supposed to be. or it may be partially con- 
nected and break after some period of time. 
"Rre two most common causes of kit failure 
are incorrect part placement and cold solder- 
ing joints, 

Many good kits suffer from instructions 
that are not exactly easy to follow. 1 followed 
the instructions provided with this kit. f didn't 
find anything confusing or ambiguous. It was 
a real pleasure after a hard day of work to 
let my mind relax and just sit down and 
build, I look my time with this project 
because 1 knew that my work schedule was 



real tight, and it is much harder to find and 
fix a building en^or than to build it right in the 
first place. 

Even though 1 took my Irmet I found that 
this project went quickly. I guess my only 
complaint with this kit was that it was such a 
pleasure to build that I missed having the 
project to look fonA^ard to after work once I 
completed it. 

Aligning the Rig 

The fateful moment had arrived. There 
were no more building instructions left, only 
testing and alignment. To align the rig you 
will need a voltmeter, a QRP dummy load, a 
QRP wattmeter, a frequency counter and 
preferably a commercial station rig. You may 
get by w^th less equipment, but 1 recommend 
doing the alignment almost exactly as ex- 
plained In the instructions. If you are a new 
builder and don t feel comfortable with this 
procedure, or don't have the necessary 
- equipment, you can send your rig 
to Oak Hills and they will align it 
for S30. 

it is suggested that you apply 
power and let it warm up for 30 
^^^ minutes before doing any align- 
ment. Putting power on a newly 
completed rig is both exciting and anxiety 
pfovoking. Even if you are a careful builden 
it is always possible that you left a tiny soi- 
der bridge or put two or more parts in Che 
wrong place on the printed circuit board. I 
had a kit that I very carefully assembled. 1 
got ready to power it up and put i1 on my 
wori^ bench. I had checked the sokJer skJe of 
the board with a magnifying glass a number 
of times while building, and then again when 
1 completed the kit. 1 didnl know it at the 
time, but some solder remains were on the 
bench and formed a soider bridge. When I 
applied power there was a sizzle and 
smoke. This time 1 carefully cleaned the 
bench, and made sure 1 had a clean piece of 
paper between the bench and the board, I 
used a bench power supply and turned the 
amps down way low on first power up to try 
to cut damages to a minimum in case of a 
problem. 

The moment of truth was at hand. The 
wires were in place, the power supply was 
turned down, and it was time to turn on the 
rig. I turned the Audio Frequency (AF) con- 
trol to power on the rig. The red power indi- 
cator on the front panel of the rig glowed a 
very pleasing red. 1 waited wilhout breathing 
for a few seconds and didn't smell any 
smoke or hear anything that sounded like 
components exploding. I smiled a very self- 
satisfied smile. 

The firsl part of the alignment involves 
connecting a frequency counter and adjust- 
ing a capacitor and coif to get the VFO on 
frequency and get it to provide 100 kHz cov- 
erage. With the 20 meter rig 1 did something 
slightly different. I was only interested in us- 
ing from 14.000 to 14.070. 1 did the adjust- 
ments using this range instead of the tOO 
kHz range suggested. The advantage of this 
was that 1 was able to get the dial thai indi- 



32 73 Amateur Radio Today • May 1 995 



cates frequency on the rig to be fairly exact. 
if I am to have a schedule with someone on 
14.026, I am now confident that we will be 
on the same frequency. I found it very hard 
to try to do an accurate adjustment for the 
entire 100 kHz, but above 14.070 are the 
digital modes and I wasn't really concerned 
about the dial reading accurately In this 
range - 

The next thing you do is adjust a variable 
resistor to the specified voltage using a volt- 
meter This was a very easy and quick ad- 
ju3tment. Next, you hook up an antenna to 
the rig and adjust the sidetone note with a 
variable capacitor. Once again, this was 
quick and easy. 

To get the receiver adfusted you adjust 
two coils for maximum signal strength by lis- 
tening to the rig with headphones. These 
were broad adjustments on the kit I built and 
very easy to do. 

When tuning the transmitter you should 
hook up a dummy load. There is a variable 
resistor to adjust the power output level and 
then one variable capacitor that you just turn 
until you observe maxrmum power output on 
a QRP wattmeter (or listen on a station rig 
that does not have an antenna connected to 
it) You next adjust a trim capacitor while lis- 
tening to your station rig until you hear a 
nice meltow tone of about 700 Hz. Ihs final 
adjustment is a resistor for the sidetone lev- 
el. The entire alignment did not take me very 
long. The only part that took some time was 
getting the VFO so that the dial reads the 
frequency fairly accurately. 

On The Air 

With a good kit I really enjoy the two parts 
involved: building the kit and then operating 
it. Well, the building went very welt and I 
couldn't have asked for anything more to be 
done to make the building experience more 
pleasurabte. It was lime to see if it really 
worked. 1 took the rig over to my operating 
bench with the cover still off (in case I need- 
ed to make any lasl-minute adjustments). I 
tuned around the band and the receiver 
sounded great. It is very quiet and seems to 
be sensitive to weak signals, as well as able 
to do a good job at separating out signals. 

I heard someone calling CQ. It was 
CT3FT, I gave him a cal( and he came back 
immediately, tt was Cedric on Madeira Is- 
land. This was very exciting tor me and a re- 
al good sign that the rig was functioning well. 
Next I had a nice long QSO with W6PTL, 
Mac in Porterville, California. He reported 
"signal is fine here/ I sat there and easily 
made contact after contact. My rig puts out 3 
watts when powered with 13.8 volts and 2 
watts when powered with 12 volts. The QSK 
is solkj-state and works great, I have realty 
enjoyed operating this rig. 

The Bottom Line 

The tKJttom line is that I feel this kit is a re- 
al bargain at SI 29.95. And, it was fun tioth to 
build and to operate. You can easily make 
many contacts using this rig with a battery 
and a wire anienna. 




SAMPLE 
COPY! 

ANTIQUE RADIO CLASSIFIED 

Antique Radioes Largest-Circufatfon 
Monthly Magazine 

Articles - C1a3srfie<l$ - Ads for Parts & Services 

Also: Earty TV, Ham Equip., Books, 

Telegraphy 40's & SD's Radios & mord... 

ff&€ 20*word ad each month. Don t miss out! 

1-Year: S29.9S (S47.95 by 1 st Class J 
6-Mpnth Trial - $16.95. Foreign - Wnte. 

A.R.C., P.O. Box 802-E9, Carlisle, MA 01741 
Or Call: (508) 371-0512 




The World ftf Ham Radio 
Callsign May 95 Database 

Ymi fan have itie lateitt CS and Foreign 
caJbi^na uvaillabk. ?O.OClO+ ^fiwan^ nifs 
fm anulfur radio. AinCall aiilo- logging 
Mull on ]trp bjxjk included wiih even- CD. 
iMcv i J5ti kfldia Motk. The iaiesj: space 
p^Dlm. The ncwc^ ickaSiU or Aniaieur 
u>fli*arE. 1. 1 00 images of lo^t k. missini; 
childnrn Thou^and^ or SWL frtqucncies 

raie% for dtitn. FTP. BBS. &. PBBS 
^ViOfK- DOS & ^'tiukyu'^ compaiibSe. 
C:m ]rdu aflfXii to be uilhout the bi£g»l 
& besl Q} fm amalKir radio? Sabaribc 
xnd |ci J K&ue^ fv ^9 US, S 109 Rittrign 
Sifif l£ iviuri S34 (idiK sluppLiig: USA S3, 
CKTmiehi USA SIO, Fcrcien Air Mail S5 
AntSonp PO Bei 666. New CiuiifaeriaDd. 
PA ITOTtW)*** LSA, FAX 717-938-6767 

Moft 7n-938-!i249 , 




CD-ROM 




OflCtE 113 ON HEADER SERVICE CAHD 



SELL YOUR PRODUCT IN 73 MAGAZINE 

CALL DAN HARPER 800-274-7373 




ELENCO • HITACHI • B&K PRODUCTS cAufou^EE 
GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES , Jo^Js'IlortcU , 



AFFORDABLE - HIGH QUALfTY 
2 YEAH WARBANTY 



ELENCO OSCfLLOSCOPES 



Hitacni Coirrpacl Series Scopes 



2CUK]: Dw3t Tract . 







STANDARD SERIES 

S- 1325 aSMHi $34^ S - 1 iy] AmUHl S4I9 

S~!3&5 GOMHz Sa^9 

Feilurei- 

■ HijJi LumiiiarwB 6' CRT fl TV Sfnc 

B 1 uiV Ssnsilivj]y ■ 3 ■ k 1 , a 1 ProtHi 

■ X-Y Operation ■ Compl^^e Sen^mfllic 
■l Voltage, TIoh, 4 Fnsquenc)! d^ifliranciK displiyid 
on CFrT :hfu m vi* oF ek»f&&ri (S^l 365 m\^) 

■ ?'JS- rrj^ft, much mors 



DEtUX SERIES 

S-133CI ?SMM; 9449 3-l345«)MH;^75 

S 1JeoeoMHiS776 



VZTZ 

V.S25 
VS23 

v-saa 

V-422 
V-22Z 

v^fieo _ 

V-6€5iA . ftOMNl.DT W/Cur»r 

V'ino ' tCX9lMH2, Duai Trac* 

V ItieSA - lOCMKz, OT w/cursw, 

V'lOHB - lOOMHl, QT, mft^tor _ 



SOURCE. Oelaved Swnv 

SOMHz. DC OflMl 

4flMHz. DC Oifa*: 

2(MHz, DC Oflser 

eOMKr. Dual Trace 



. 1 1 .«9 
_»975 

__ie49 

_|aB5 

.11.375 
■£, 1 f £ 



■ Ci\iyt<S Swltp 

■ ALicqmaiii; |«>m Pindar 

■ I Am Mo4ulai«n 

■ e«IFHnCompon(ntT(H 

■ Plui III ih4 l«4lures of thff 'gifgrcrabU' « erias 



■ Duaitmii bfljt 

■ IIKjminaiid in itrnal 
IJivdicurt 



B&K OSCILLOSCOPES 



^1 ZQ - MMHT Diial Trac* 

?( 25 ^ 20MK1 Q«\a.fta SwMp 

1 54 1 B - ACtAHt Diiai Trac* 

.2 i-SD ' ecMHz DuaI Trac*. D«Lira^ Swoop. 

Dual Time Bas* S^* 

21^ - tOOMHj TMae Trie* Dual Tvni Baas, 

Delay Mf Swfifrp . |i,379 

2522A - ZDMHz / ^DMS/s Storag* IMS 




Digital 
Multimtter 

$175.00 

Almosi twavf 

leature jviplable 

Bar-paiif at 

ihe decade 



Elfinco LCR + DMM 
LCM'iajO 



13 Fuftttioni 

Frtq \Q mHz 

IptdudancB 





3^3/4 DJgil MirltJmeler 
BK390 

$139-00 

• Arsttri bar giraptl 

4 Ai:\omtmti -anting 

4.l)«HUi:rt LCOoisptir 

• 'e^ptri'L'P probe 




Digital Ca pad lanct 
Met«r 

$49.95 

■ Ma^h^TH cipacilpri 
tPOtn ipri;c>3QO0&jii 

« 3^^.19 Oi^il LCD ret^ul 
wlh Lii"il mdicalor 



Digital Mullimtler Kit 

wMhTfAifilngCaurH 
fly Elinc? 

$49.95 

EiVi -M^t &ip'Mj * ideil &dlCBl|nf«l 
u-mi |ABaa4i«M)t9f.«e 







Dlgll^l LCR Meter 
LCB-6ao 

$79.95 

- ^-V2 DigiElCD Disiiia.ir 

• lndudaii« 'i^H K 20CH 

^a^latice 1^ b; 20MQ 

-Cdpatlince i^jlio 

2DDuF 



Fraqueniiy CounKr 

F-1Z25 

~^'l $225.00 

* IffiEM mtatyrtrr^ li'^gs 

• Data rK<id 'urnoi 

- 1(5 1 -"ChA J1Itr'.J!iDr 'd*:fl-C* 



Function ti&neralor 




$239 



hnd/Exl 
OfKriUnn 
Sine. Square. TniiT>gli, PiJh) 



FLUKE MULTIMETERS 

(All ModMt AvattBfb^ CoHI 






Hods' 95 

14? ShIbs. 

Wod«JlO 
MtMSeJ iJ 






U«W?C>li 
uod*i7Tii 
ModetTill 
A? Sofin 

Mod* 97- 



FM Receiter Kil & Training Course 
S44.S5 AJtZNEa.« ^^^^^^^^^% 



* Clicks- 9s<' ^ asttf^ ^lij. 
liH«fUi a«4 i mm ti^uvt-t. 

FH 



tl 



f 



$34,95 t^vtvt tit 



Ti9«pha«Kit 
prasK 



$14.95 





TransislOf Radio Kits 

i^Alfrflil-ise 52S^ 
AmiHflaKJt 



VfE W!li TiOT BE UHOtflSOLD 



Funclifin Gerwftt«r 

— _-, ^ iioi 
$29.95 



Tetaphfiiit Line AralyzAr 



iutn-4vgfc 



Bulane So levering Iron 



1 *i iHKt ill OH* 



mnp #7fio 

S24 95 




Comb i nation 

Emt/IAiCfOwsve 

Tester 

$89.95 



^mtni 



tHb 



LHm to BuikJ atH) PnogrMi 
with Uiii Kh 




HU<B00a 

$129,00 



J tan fcuminuMp. wtifSi Mm 



CSS SALES ttlC. 

»24& HDSfWCrc^ Dri»ri£tO IL MJOtS 
FAX /»ri24^0O«J*«TM)S4f.QfKI 



ElKtronic Toc4 Kil 




D Kg I [at Analog Trainer 




I1SIJ5 





Eiart f'^adl tU b-*:^ QSI J 



1& DAY l/ONtV BACI! GUARANTtt 
FULL FACTOUV VfAffKMitt 
WWn FOB FR££ CATAlOG 



CfnCLE ia4 ON READEH SEBVICE CABO 



73 Amareur Radio Tadsy May. 1995 33 



6 Meters 
The In-Between Band 

Excitement for all license classes. 



Number 8 on your Feedback card 



by Gordon West WB6N0A 



No-code Technicians are discovering a 
^'secrei*' band of frequencies ihai few 
people talk about ihes€ days during the 
sunsp^u Lvcle low: the 6 meier band from 50 
to 54 MHt. This band is available to no- 
code Technician Class license opemiors, and 
higher grade licenses, with no resiriciions on 
emissions, power outpui, or frequencies 
within the band. Tn oihcr words, as a no- 
code Technician, you have ihe same privi- 
leges on 6 meters as an E?ttra Class operator 
would have! 

The 6 meter band is divided into a band 
plan as adapted by the American Radio 
Relay League and recognized by the Federal 
Communications Commission. The band 
plan reserves certain frequencies for FM 
and repeaters, with the bottom portion 
of the band reserved for CW and SSB weak- 
signal operation- There are also plenty 
of frequencies reserved for packet communi- 
cations. 

Getting started on the 6 meter band using 
FM for simplex and repeater communica- 
tions is a greai way to meet *'the gang." 
Once you get on the air on 6 meters, you 
will find special 6 meter clubs whose only 
interest is pioneering the 6 meter band. Go 



ARRL 6 Meter Wavelength Band Plan, 50.0^4,0 MHz 


MHz 


Use 


50.100-50.300 


SSB, CW 


50.100-50.125 


DX window 


50.110 


SSB calling frequency 


50.300-50.600 


Non- voice communications 


50,620 


Digital/packet calling frequency 


5o.8o050.aeo 


Radio control 




20 kHz channels 


51.000-51.100 


Padttc DX window 


51.120-51.480 


Repeater inputs (19) 


51.120-51.180 


Digital repealer inputs i 


51 .620-51 ,980 


Repeater ouipuis (19) 


51 .620 


Digital repeater oijtput& 


52,000-52.480 


Repeater inputs (23) 


52.020, 52.040 


FM simplex 


52.500-52.980 


Repeater outputs (23) 


52,525. S2.S40 


FM simplex 


53.000*54.480 


Repeater inputs (19) 


53.000. 53.020 


FM simplex 


53.1/53.2/53.3/53.4' 


Radio controi" 


53.500-53.980 


Repeater outputs (19) 


53.5^3.6/53.7/53.8' 


Radio control' 


53.520 


Simplex 


53.900 


Srmpiex 


'Optional local cfioice 




From Goftkm West AmaleiJr NthCocte Pius Book, Master Putiiish^, Inc. 



to a cluh meeting and get 
a list of all of the local 6 
meter repeaters in your 
area, and see how far 6 
meters propagates com- 
pared to what you* re 
presently getting for 2 
meter range direct and 
through repeaters. 

Compared to 2 meters. 
6 meter simplex gives you 
better range in the moun- 
tains and over hills. The 
longer wavelength is less 
attenuated by hills and 
trees, so you may find a 
remarkable increase in 
communications range on 
6 meters versus what you 
have been enjoying on 2 
meters. 

Working through 6 me- 
ter repeaters is similar to 2 
meters— 50 to 75 miles is common. 

But get set for the fireworks when the 
band opens up on 6 meters this .summer. 
During the summer months, invisible ion- 
ized dense patches of **E-layer clouds*' will 

drift from the West 
Coast to the East 
Coast, sometimes 
opening up your sim- 
plex and repeater 
communications to 
beyond 1,300 miles! 
One minute you're 
working through your 
local repeater in 
town, and a few sec- 
onds later duiing the 
summer months an- 
other repeater in an- 
other city a thousand 
miles away begins to 
override your local 
repeater, and a distant 
station acknowledges 
your call up to L500 
miles awav. 

Even though we 
are at the bottom of 
Solar Cycle 22. the 
summertime Spo- 
radic-E 6 meter band 
openings will comin- 




Fhota A. Bob K6PHE and Grade KK6CG Hastings run 
handhelds in Soul hem California. They love the excitement of 6 
meter FM! 



ue to occur independent of the solar cycle. 
And it*s a guaranteed event — during May, 
June. July, and August, the b meter band 
"opens" for Sporadlc-E FM and SSB com- 
nuuiications over di.stances up to 1,500 
miles. This summer, 1 predict the band will 
open up at least two or three days every 
week. In the morning hours, listen for sta- 
tions coming in from the East. In the after- 
noon hours, listen for stations coming in 
from the West. The best time to talk "skip" i.s 
a few hours after local sunrise, mid-after* 
noon, and during an evening peak around 
7:00 p.m. local in the direction of the west. 
During lunchtime, you can expect stations to 
come in this summer trom Canada, as well 
as South America. 

Your antenna considerations are simple — 
home-brew your own 54" ground plane with 
54'\ 45-degree downward-sloping radials* 
and feed it with good coax, or consider one 
of the excellent collincar 6 meter base sta- 
tion antennas from Diamond or Comet. For 
mobile installations, an old state police 54" 
\\hip works nicely on 6 meters — or if you 
have the bottom half of a Hustler lold-over 
HF mast, you will find it works dandy as a 
quaner-wave whip on 6 meters. 

If V'ou ha\ e a base-loaded 2 meter mobile 
antenna, unscrew the loading coil and screw 
m a 6 meter coil with the appropriate yard 
long whip. 



34 73 ^mafeurflacf/o Today* May, 1995 




^J 


ISA 


•lii. 




O) 


;is 


<0i 


> 


o 


o 


*Cb 


o 


en 




^ 


tti 


^^L 






c^ 


* 






^^ 


00 


CD 
CD 


s 


• 


Id 


^ 


O) 


3 


ro 


&) 


1 


^^ 


ro 


CD 


O) 


^™i 




3 


^^ 






• 


• 






o 


T1 


oa 


lU 




M 


n^t 




o 


^ *i 


mq 


*^ 


3 


^^^ 


*ilB« 


4:^ 


D3 


>-*-' 


40 


0> TNJ 


OJ 


03 


«3 


C3 


1 


O) 


^ 





hd 






S2 



CD 



"Hi 



5? P- 



do 



en 



^ a> CD 

CD Ed 

^ eft 

ct -;- 

<to 3 



a> 



30 

CD 

-o 



en 

CD 



CD 



I 
OP 

to 

3 O 



CD 
to 

&7 



1 



'^•, 



I 










GP-3 • Dual-band l46/446MHz Base Repeater Antenna 

Gain & Wave; umHz 4.5dBi 6/8 wave • AASmi 7 2d8i S/8 wave x 3 

Max Pwr: 200W • Lengm: 511'- Weight: 2Ibs. 9ozs • 

Conn: Gold-plaled SO-239 • Construction: SInglfi-pifice ftbergfass 



GP^ * Dual-band 146/446IVlHzBase Repeater Antenna 
, Gail) & Wave: 146MHz 6.5dBJ 5/8 wave x 2 *446MHz 9.0d8i 5/B wave x 5 • 
Max Pwr 200W * Length: 102 • Weight: 3lbs. So^s • Conn: Gold-plated SO-239 
Construction: Fiberglass, 2 Sections 




GP-S/QP'-BN • Duat-band 146/446MHz Base Repeater Antenna • BEST SELLER! 
Gain & Wave 146MHz 8.5cJBI 5/B wave x 3 • 446MHz 1 1 .9dBi 5/8 v^ave x 8 • 
Max Pwr: 200W * Length: ^7T • Weight: 5lbs. 11ozs. • Conn; GP-9 Gold-pfated 
SQ-239 * GP-9N Gold-plated N-type temale • Construction: Fiberglass. 3 Seclions 



• • 



CA^SSDB • Mono^band 6 Meter Vertical 

Gain & Wave: 52MHz 6.5dBi 5/8 wave x 2 • Max Pwr: 500W • Length 2r8^ 
Weight: 5lbs. 1 1 ors. * Conn: 30-239 • 2MHz band-width after \mmQ (6M) ■ 
Constrtjctiofi; Thick-wall atuminum, 5 sections 



^1 ^^ 



^ /^'mimmmam 



imm 



mitmm 



wSt 




CX-S33 *Trl"band 146/220/446MHz Base Repeater Antenna 
Gain 4 Wave; 146MHz 6.5dBi 5/8 wave • 220MH7 7.8dBf 5/8 wave )« 3 • 
446MHz 9.0dBi 5/8 wave x 5 * Max Pwn 120W * Length: 1 0'2' • Weight: 3fbS- 1 oz. 
Conn: Goid-fjlated 50-239 • Construction: Fiberglass, 2 Sections 



GP-15 ■ TrKband 52/145/446MHz Base Repeater Antenna 

Gain & Wave: 52MHz 3,0dBi 5/8 wave • t46MHz 6.2dBt 5/8 wave x 1 - 

446MHz 8.6dBI 5/8 wave x 4 * Max Pwr: 300W • Lenglh: 511' • Weight: 3lbs. loz. 

• Conn: Gold-plated SD*239 ■ Construction; Single-piece fiberglass 






69 




n 



73 Review 



Number 9 on your Feadback card 



by Gordon West WB6NOA 



The Alinco 



A new 6 meter mobile transceiver. 




M06 



AJinco Electronrcs fnc. 

438 Amapola Ave., #130 

Torrance CA 9050 T 

Telephone: (310) 618-8616 

Fax (310) 618-8758 

Price CJass: S459 



Alinco Electronics has just introduced their 
new 6 meter mobile transceiver DR-M06 
With built-in CTCSS tone eiicode, and an in- 
credible 100-memory channel capacity 
stfalght out of the box to memorize your local 
and all-a^untry 6 meter repeater and simplex 
channels. Use the ARRL repeater directory 
for memorizing 6 meter repeater frequencies. 
and don1 be surprised to see different ofJset 
frequencies for different parts of the country. 
Most of the country uses a -1 .6 MHz split, but 
the Columbia Region 6 Meter Association, 
representing Washington. Oregon, and British 
Columbia, uses an input/output spacing of U 
MHz, giving them 60 repeater pairs and up to 
25 simplex channels. The 6 meter national 
FM 6 meter simplex frequencies are 52.525 
and 52,540, and California operates FM sim- 
plex at 50,3 MHz. 

Tbe liny Alinco does it all with 10 watts of 
FM power ootpul. We actually measured 12 
watts of power output when our vehk^le was 
running and Ihe input voltage was 13,8 VDC. 
The Alinco transceiver also ran extremely cool 
because of all the fins on the heat sinks, and 
we were surprised to see a transceiver this 
small keep its temperature down during long 
periods of transmit. 

The Alinco DR-M06 also uses a duaUcon- 
version receiver and here in L,A. it's realty 
necessary to keep out image frequencies and 
other nearby signals. We measured receiver 
sensitivity at 0.1 microvolts at 12 dB SINAD — 
16 dBu. Power output was judged "very loud* 
at 3 watts from Ihe top-mounted speaker. A 
typical speaker jack allows you to remote- 
mount a speaker 
in extremely 
noisy vehicles. 

The Alinco 
mike incorpO' 
rates up-and- 
down keys to 
zing through the 
channels, or to 
review memo- 
rized channels. 
[i you hold down 
tfie button, it 
launches the ra- 
dio into scan- 
ning, Tbere is a 
lock key on the 
front of the mike 
that you can en- 
gage with your 




Photo C, The fuli- featured 
Alinco 6m mobile micro- 
phone. 



thumb to cancel the 
effects of pushing the 
up or down button. 
Very handy— selecl 
the frequency of 
choice off of the mike, 
click on the lock but- 
ton, and you won't 
need to worry about 
accidentally jumping 
off frequency. 

Operation 

The operation of 
the transceiver *s 
straightforward— you 
don't even n%e6 to 
plow through the in- 
struction manual. The 
function-shift allows 
you to program 1 .6 or 
U MHz duplex oper- 
ation, or for that mat- 
ter, any split on any 
one of the 100 chan- 
nels. The reverse but- 
ton lets you listen in on the repeater input fre- 
quency to determine proximity to another sta- 
tion on the input. We liked the speed of the mi* 
croprocessor when turning the big frequency 
knob to zip through the channels. We have 
tried other 6 meter FM sets and found that the 
nik:roprocessor unlocks during a rapid spin- 
ning of the channel knob. This means you can 
zip through active frequencies without discov- 
ering they are actually in use. With the AlirKO. 
a moderate tuning of the big knob allows you 
to quickly hear whafs happening on many dif- 
ferent frequencies without the synthesizer go- 
Ing out of lock. This is a good feature for those 
of us that ttke to spin the knob looking for ac- 
tivity! But with any microprocessor-controlled 
radio, spinning the knob too fast may cause 
you to overtook weak signals on the band. 

We judged the Alinco squelch as typical of 
most other transceiver squelch circuits — hard 
squelch. Weak stations will chatter the 
squelch, and there is not enough hysteresis in 
the squelch to keep rt open for a weak signal 
coming in and out of reception to stay on the 
air with the squelch circuit open. I opened up 
an old Commtronix 6 meter radio that has 
been sitting around my shack for (he past 15 
years, and discovered a simple improvement 
to make to the squelch circuit on my present 
Alinco by adding several tantalum capacitors 




Photo A, The Alinco DR-M06^ 




Photo B. The new Aiinco 6 meter r^dio was easy to opersie with its 
logical layout of buttons and sub-functions. 



to keep the squelch open during weak-signal 
reception. The only disadvantage after my 
modification was a rather long squelch tail af- 
ter a strong signal disappeared on receive. 
But for weak signal reception, the long 
squelch tat) kept the squelch from chattering 
closed. 

The LCD readout was a big improvement 
over my old Commtromx FM ng that used dull, 
hard-to-see LEDs. At nighttime, the Alinco 
LCD panel had plenty of brighlness from the 
backlights. 

But best of all with the new Alinco is its 100 
channels of memory. While you wouldn't think 
that you need 100 channels on 6 meters, 
you really should stuff in at least 40 to 50 
repeaters, In and out of your area, to get set 
for when the band opens. With the built-in 
CTCSS. reading over the ARRL repeater di- 
rectory will give you a good idea of what tones 
to put into what channels, and what channels 
to scan for activity when the band opens up 
this summer 

The bright display and easy to use features 
make the new Alinco an inexpensive way to 
get on the fabutous 6 meter bands, where 
skywave DX to the no-code operator may be 
an every-week occurrence this summer- from 
50 MHz to 54 MHz, the 6 meler band is full ol 
surprises. 



36 73 AmatQur Radio Today * May 1995 




MFJ's worid famous 3 KW Antenna Tuner 

If you won 't settle for less . . . here is the finest 3 KW tuner money can buy I 



The MFJ-989C is not for evetyone. 

However^ if you make the 
investment, you'll get the finest 3 
KW antenna tuner money can buy. 

Here's why . . . 

Massive IVansinitting Capacitors 

You get two masjiive 250 p( 
IransmiUing variable capacitors 
with detailed logging scales. They 
can handle amps of RF current and 
withstand 6C}00 RF volts because 
the plates are smoothed and polish- 
ed and have extra wide spacmg. 

Pl^eckion Roller Inductor 

A precision roller inductor, 3 
digit turns counter and spinner knob 
giveii you exact inductance control 
for absolute minimum SWR. 

Ball bearings on steel shafts 
give you a velvet smooth vernier 
teel and long term durability. 

You won t have arcing problems 



I. i-¥siiTf RLTTStaj 




vvith this roller inductor, 
Firm springs put high 
pressure on a plated contact wheel 
for excellent electrical contact 
WidCj low inductance straps 
are used for high currents and a 
new core minimizes RF loss. 



^0 "^ ^0 Cross-Needle Meter 
MFJ-9S9C You get a lighted peak and 
average reading Cross -Needle 
SWR/Wattmeter with 200 and 



2000 watt ranges. Its new direc- 
tional coupler gives you accurate 
readings from 1.8 to 30 MHz. -^^^^ '' *^^^/^ for less, get yours today! 



f 



Super Heavy Duty Balun 

You get a super heavy duty cur- 
rent balun for balanced lines. It has 
two giant 2'/2 inch powder iron 
toroid cores and is wound with 
Teflon^ wire connected to high 
voltage ceramic feedthru insulators. 
It lets you operate high power into 
balanced feed lines without core 
saturation or voltage breakdown. 

Ceramic Antenna Switch 

A two wafer 6 position ceramic 
antenna switch with extra large con- 
tacts gives you trouble free switching. 

Plus much, much more 

You also get a 300 watt dummy 
load, full one year unconditional 
guarantee, flip stand, all aluminum 
cabinet, lough baked on paint, 
locking compound on all nuts and 
bolts. 3 KW PEP. 1 074x4 Vax 1 5 in. 



More hams use MFJ tuners than all other tuners in the world! 
Why settle for an imitation when you can have the real thing? 






NVM's dBlwxB 300 Waft Tuner IMF J's super vafue Tkiner 



MFJ's sitiaff est Versa Tkiner 



wmM¥^ii^^s^: 



jUTJ nKtma PitasA Ttiftrnfu 



1hHi«>n» nbOFIi^ 



uinipp Itutfti^b 



^0^:^ 



>m^ 





The 



MFJ-90IB 
1 95 




MFJ-949E More hams use the MFJ -9 49 E than 
$ I ^<is5 any other antenna tuner in the world! 

A ^19 Why? Because you get proven 

reliability, the ability to match just about anything 
and a one year unconditional guarantee. 

You get a lighted peak and average reading 
Croas-Needle SWR/ watt meter, antenna switch, 4: 1 
balun for balanced lines, 1 .8-30 MHz coverage and 
A full size dummy load that easily handles 300 watts 
of abusive tune-up power. 

New 8 position antenna switch lets you 
pre- tune into dummy load to minimize QRM. 

The inductor switch is designed for high RF 
voltages and currents— it's not ii plastic switch made 
for small signals and wired with tiny gauge wire. 

Each MFJ-949E cabinet is chemically treated 
and iias a new tough scratch-proof vinyl cladding 
" not paint that can scratch or chip off. You won't 
find a tougher, longer lasting finish anywhere. 

MFJ's versofife 1.5 KW Tuner 



M FJ-94 IE "^^^ new M FJ -94 1 E g i ve s y o u a 3 (K) 
$^ AQdS watt PEP tuner with lighted 

Cross -Needle Meter that covers every- 
thing from 1 ,8-30 MHz for an incredible $109.95. 
Antenna switch selects 2 coax lines (direct or 
thru tuner), random wire, balanced line or external 
dummy load. 4:1 bahm. 1000 volt capacitors. 

2 Knob Dflifereiifiafrf 'Teller 



iii.HilHi»iM«.i,ii • 7 ri.vi^*. 




MFJ-901Bisour ^cqi 
smallest -5x2x6 ^^ 
inches --(and most afford- 
able) 200 watt PEP tuner - 
when both your space and your budget is limited. 
Great for matching solid state rigs to linear amps, 

MFJ's rajicfom wire Timer 

Operate^ail j^pj.i^QiQ 
bands any w here $ o Q 99 
with any tr an S' ^^ 
ceiver with the MFJ- 16010. 
It lets you turn a random wire 
into a transmitting antenna. I .S-30 MHz, ' 
200 watts PER Ultra small 2x3x4 inches. 

MFJ's VHF or IfffF Tuneri 



AV 






bS^S 



MFJ-921 orMFJ-924 



■*^ 



Hff 



" .--i-J. ■; 



"'^/^ffr^*^^'^ 



;* 



38^,.^^ ^-.^Rt- 



i 




MFJ-9G2C Use your barefoot rig now and have 
$229^^ the capacity to add a 1.5 KW PEP 

amplifier later! Lighted Cross-Needle 
SWRAVaUmeten 6 position antenna switch, 
Teflon'^ wound balun, ceramic feedthru insulators 
for balanced lines, 1.8-30 MHz. I0V4x4'/2xl4%in, 

MFJ's perhfbfe/QRP Tuner 

Ibnescoax, ..^,^^. v:.^-^ 

balanced lines, $i|M5 ^"'"^^H X - - I^ 
random wire 1.8- 8" "^--^ w 5|CP 

30 MHz. Cn^ss- Needle Meter -^-^ ^^ • 
SWR, 3&300 or 6 waff QRP ranges. 6x672x2'/2 in. 




MFI-986 ^^^ MFJ-yMDifferential-T^ 
$289^3 2 knob tuner uses a differential 

capacitor to make lyn i ng foolproof and 
easier than ever It ends constant re-tuning with 
broadband coverage and gives you minimum SWR 
at only one best setting. 3 KW PER L8-30 MHz. 

Roller inductor makes tuning smooth and easy. 
Turns counter lets you quickly re- tune to frequency. 

Lighted Cross-Needle Meter reads SWR/ 
forward/re nected//?ea/:/average power in 2 ranges. 
Current balun reduces feedline radiation and forces 
equal currents into unbalanced antennas. 

MFJ's mebffe Tuner 

MFJ-945D 

Don't leave 
home without 
this mobile 
tuner! Let the 
MFJ-945D 

extend your antenna bandwidth so you don't have 
to stop, go outside and adjust your mobile whip. 
Small 8x2x6 inches uses little room^ Lighted 
CrosS'Needle SWR/Wattmeier makes tuning easy 
while in motion. Mas lamp switch. 1 .8-30 MHz. 
300 watts PEP. Mobile mount, MFJ-20, $4.95. 



MFJ-921 covers 2 Meters/220 MHz. MFJ'924 
covers 440 MHz. SWR/Watlmeter. Sx2'/2x3 in. 
Simple 2-knob tuning^ for mobile or base. 

MFJ's arffflclaf RF Ground 

Creates MFJ-931 
anificial RF SJg^s 
ground. Elimi- 
nates or reduces RF hot 
spots, RF feedback, TVI/ 
RFI, weak signals caused 
by poor RF grounding. Also electrically places a 
far away RF ground directly at your rig by tuning 
out reactance of connecting wire. 










«89'5 



W^fT. 








.jiom 


'X 


''^- '^ 


•jw>r VT 


£A-:^-,'-;h^mtL' 


•."^^P^^jjsrj- 


m 


u 

f 


^ . ■Hw.:irfi}iS:±-Xi?,-l*^.> 3 ..' ■• ." . . 




J •• V 








J 



Free MFJ Catalog 

Write or call toU-free . . . 800-647-1800 



Nearest Dealer/Orders: 800-647-1800 

24 Hour FAX: (601) 323 6551 
Technical Help: 800-647-TECH (8324) 

MFJ ENTERPRISES, INC 

R O. Box 494, Miss. State, MS 39762 
(601) 323-5S6y; S^4:30 CST Mon.-Fri, 
76206.1 763(g) com puserve.com; Add s/h 
Prices and apecJIicalions subjeict 10 cMtig!t , e 1994 MFJ Knttrptis^s. inc. 




MFJ . . . making quality affordable 



CIRCLE 86 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Review 



Number 10 on your Feedback card 



by Barry Kennedy N2PNG 



The Comet HA4S 



A mobile HF antenna 



Ever since the introduclion of several small 
HF transceivers ttiere has been a huge in- 
flux in the amount of HF mobiiing. It is now 
very easy for anyone to throw a rig in Hi e car 
and operate on Itiose long road trips. Choos- 
ing the right antenna can be the hardest part 
of the whole installation. With so many differ- 
ent makes and models avaHable, deciding 
what is besi suited for your needs can be con- 
fusing and difficult. 

With so many of us driving small cars today 
and living in urban areas, the size of the an- 
tenna can be a problem. Several months ago 
L noticed Ihe Comet HA4S pictured on the 
cover of 73 magazine. What a neai-looktng 
antenna— small, and having the ability to fold 
over like some of the fancier VHF/UHF anten- 
nas. Finally, ifs a small antenna that you don't 
have to take off the car to pull into the garage. 

It is important to understand that any mo- 
bile antenna is a compromise. There is no 
mobile antenna that is as efficient as a yagi or 
a quarter-wave vertical with elevated radials. I 
have found that generally the bigger antennas 
tend to be more efficient and have a greater 
bandwidth. You gain a small size with many 
HF mobile antennas, but you tend to lose 
bandwidth and efficiency. 1 was curious to see 
how well the Comet HA43 performed com- 
pared to some of the larger antennas that I 
have used. 

The Comet HA4S 

The HA4S is considerably smaller than 
most HP mobile antennas, measuring only 
4T tall and weighing just over a pound. It is 
rated to handle 120 watts SSB. The HA4S 
comes standard with four bands: 40 ^ 15, 12, 
and to meters. Each band is a separate coil 
that attaches to a mast, similar lo the Hustler 
antennas. An optional coil can replace one of 
the existing ones, adding the 20 meter band. 
The 40 meter coiS screws into Ihe top of the 
mast while the other three coils screw into a 
circular hub just below the 40 meter coiL The 
coils slope downward, making the antenna 
appear somewhat like a discone. Comet 
thoyghtfulty includes a wrench for proper 
tightening of the coils lo the mast. The assem- 
bly of the antenna was extremely easy and 
straightforward — it took all of about three min- 
utes to complete. 

The connector on the end of the mast is a 
standard UHF male {PL259). Most antennas 
use the heavier duty 3fB" threaded mount. 
The reason lor this is ttiat the bigger Ihe an- 
tenna is, the greater the windload is going to 



be, and the 3/8' is just a slronger mount 

capable of handling much larger loads. After 
flipping through my catalogs I found that 
several manufacturers make heavy-duty 
mag-mounts as well as rail and lip mounts, 
with the UHF female, that are more than 
capable of handling the HA4S, 

The mast on the HA4S folds over just like 
some of the fancjer VHFAJHF antennas. This 
is a great feature: no more taking the antenna 
on and off each time you pull into the garage. 
To lower the antenna, unscrew the collar sur- 
rourKling the fold-ever hinge, lift the mast oul 
of the socket, and it will fold over to the side- 
To right the HA4S. pull the antenna vertical 
and back into the socket and tighten the col- 
lar locking it back into place. 

Tuning the HA4S 

As i mentioned, the use ot coils and traps 
timrts the bandwidth of an antenna somewhat, 
and is not as efficient as using a fulf-size an- 
tenna. Comet clarms that the antenna will res- 
onate in any 46 kHz section of the 40m band 
with a 2.0:1 SWR or better. Bandwidth for 
each frequency range increases up to 660 
kHz with a 2.0:1 SWR or better in the 10m 
range. To adjust the antenna to resonate in 
the desired segment of the band, you length- 
en or shorten the whips on the coils. By mak- 
ing the whip slightly longer you lower the cen- 
ter frequency. Let's say i want my HA4S to 
resonate between 14.180 IVlHz and 14,220 
MHz. I would first go to my center frequency, 
check my SWR, and adjust my whip accord- 
ingly until minimal SWR is obtained. This can 
be done by transmitting low power into the an- 
tenna and checking the measurements on 
your meter. I use an MFJ-259 SWR analyzer, 
an invaluable tool for tuning antennas or any 
other type of antenna work. It doubles as a 
frequency counter and an SWR bridge, avow- 
ing me lo check the es^act SWR of any fre- 
quency I specify. This tells me where my an- 
tenna is resonant and allows me to do this 
without the use of my transceiver. H is very 
important that you make sure you have good 
ground connection from your antenna lo your 
car. A bad ground is often the cause of many 
problems, such as a high SWR. 

I had no problem adjusting tiie coil for 10, 
12, 15^ and 20 meters. I picked my center fre- 
quency and adjusted the whip for the minimai 
SWR, then checked 20 kHz either side and 
found the SWR to be fine. 

On 40 meters I had to trim the whip 
slightly before I was able to resonate the 



NCG/Comet 

NCG Companies 

1275 North Grove Street 

Anaheim CA 92806 

Telephone: (714) 630-4541 

Fax (714) 630-7024 

Price Class: $199 

Optionat 20 meter coil— $39 




The Comet HA4S. 



antenna above the CW portion of the band* 

Performance 

Most of my tests were conducted on 20 
meter SSB, due mostly to propagation. Over- 
alt, f was impressed. The HA4S performed 
like a champ. On my drive back lo college I 
was hearing strong signals from tiolh W6 and 
W4 land. I worked EA30T without any difficul- 
ty, and received a 57 report. Soon after, I was 
chatting with some guy in northern Florida 
with a 59 signal. I also made contacts on Ihe 
other bands as well as 40 meter CW. 

It is important to remember that this anten- 
na was more than likely designed for the 
Japanese amateur, with small size and versa- 
tility in mind. In getting the nice small pack- 
age, you lose bandwidth, making the HA4S 
fairty frequency selective once you have set 
your center frequency. If you try lo operate 
outside the 20 kHz on erther side of the center 
frequency you will notice a rapid increase in 
your SWR. However, if bandwidth is not your 
biggest concern arnj getting a smalL excellent 
mobile antenna that has some unique 
features is, then the HA4S will do the trick. 



38 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



TRANSMITTER LOCATION 



Direclion Finding System 
Tracks Down 

* Stuck Microphones 

* Cable TV Leaks 

* Jammed Repeaters & 
Cell Sftes 



Models available with 
computer interface, 
synthesized speech, 
for fixed or mobile 
use, covering 50 MHz 
to 1 GHz. Call or fax 
for details 





DOPPl^*^ 



SYSTEMS 



INC 



Cat«h«« 



^^jizona 



Fax 



-.Vz^ 488-1295 



CIRCLE 13 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ID-8 Automatic Morse Station Identifier 

Compatible witti CommerciaK Public Safety, and Amateur Radio 
applicatrons. U^s include Repeatet Menti tiers. Base Station tdentiflers. 
Beacons, CW MBmory Keyers, e!c. Great tof RCC ID Cornplianca 



lUliTiiatufB in Sl2d, 1,fl5'')(1.t2"yO 35", 

Tjjtally RF immune 

All conrir&cffons made with rrnciDiniriiatufe pfug and sock^ with cQlor totted wi*^ atiacned 

CMOS (ncf^foce^gor lur lew wlldgg Vrti currefil OfKTHldan 6lo 20 WX unTieguLalfd A Snu. 

Low disuriiQfi, low si^MlaACe. AClHJ5tat}le anewtve &jlput lo 4 vMs p«ak te peak 

Crystal ctninAd lot tipgfi xsutdcjf 

BaBsmMSer PIT w^ (!o key traflsmrtter M^^e !t^ is s»^ seni}. s an opetr coiecbr 

tr^iststeir \m mm handle BQ ¥DC H SOC^iul 

Fieti pfogranvnable witfi SUPPU£D leeytioaitf 

Conrrrmaticn lone lo mtScaie accented pa^mfftef phis icnes ta rniHcaie p.iograntfning errof 

AH pmqr^mm^ng (S iXom id a noft-volaiite EEPROM wnicn may i» afterec ai arty lime 

Message langTh over 2O0 chsractprs Itjng, 

Tnggsr lU wilh acilve fiigti or low 

inhibit iD wilh active high of \m Will hoid afl ID UTilff channel 1^ cloar o1 Irattii;, 

Generares repealer cajrtesy tone a] enc oi user rrsnsrrhssion ti snatHsd 

DcKibfie SJded lape arMl irouming naro^are supplcid tof <;yick rmiinifing 

Ofiefaimg \ewQS3Aiim range. -30 dogrees C lo +fiS degrees C, 

RiS w^ year wansicy wtien rvaim«l lo fie tadwy Iv r«pK 

rmme«iat one day deiwfy. 



Programmable Features 

* Eight pfCtffamfTMate. ssiectsofe, messages. 

* CW speed from 7 to 99 WPf^, 

• iD int&rvai Unm from t-99 mmuf&s. 

• iD tKitl otf Umcf imT} 0-&9 seconds 

• CW tone fmfi/mcy turn W ht to 3000 tiz. 

* Frnni pofth OetSf mtm^ fwm 1& 99 seconas 

$89,95 each 

programming keyboard included 









cmmuiCAJioNS speciausts, inc. 

426 vVESr TAf J AVfNUB • ORANG£. CA ^2ii65-4S9€ 
i?U} mS JGJf ■ FAX f7M.i ^7434P0 
Entire USA IHQQ} B5^-054? * MX t»00} 424 ^42Q 



cmcLE 10 on reader service card 



SOOKHz to 
1.30GHz, 

Tbtal coverage at 
a vci>' econonii- 
cai price. VFO. 
Scanji lockout 
and RiD fijnction 
LX)C (fi^itay. 
Stqis down to 
5KHz£EPROM 
nienior>^. BNC 
iintenna connec- 
tor. Size: 5 7/8*H 
X 1 1/2 1> X r*W. 
Wt:l4oz. 
liK'ludes AA 
Batteries. Cell 
blocked for use in 
USA. Gdl or fax 
Toll tree in USA 
and Canada. 24 
homx a day, 7 




TRIDBNT 

TB1200 Now Only 

$369oa 






MJNiCATiONS 



S 



Measure Up With Coaxial Dynamics 
Model 81000A RF Directional Wattmeter 

Model S1000A is a thoroughly engineered, portable, insertion type wattmeter 

designed to measure both FWD/RFL 

C. W. power in Coaxia* transmission lines* 

StOOOA is comprised of a buiH4n line 
section, direct reading 3-scale 
meter protected by a shock-proof 
housing. Quick-match connectors, 
plus 3 complete selection of plug-in 
elements, gives the FRONT RUNNER 
reliability, durability, flexibiiity 
and adaptability with a two year 
warranty. 

Contact us for your nearest 
authorized Coaxial Dynamics 
representative or distribulof in 
our world-wide sales network. 




COAXrAL 

DYNAMICS, 

INC. 



1 800 445 7717 

10707 E. 106th, Fishers. IN 46038 
IntmTationaJ; 317 842 7115 Fax 317 849 8794 

CIRCLE 164 DM READER SERVICE CARO 



15210 fndustnal Parkway 
Cleveland, Ohio 44135 
216-267-2233 
1^00-COAXiAL 
FAX: 216-267-3142 

Service and Dependability. 




See Us Ai Dayton - Booths 40 f A 402 



A Part of Every Product 



CIRCLE tS6 ON READER SERVJCE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1995 39 



Numter 11 Of) your Fee<lbdck card 



A Foolproof 
Power Controller 

Be prepared when the commercial power shuts off. 



by Charles M. Seay, Sr. KN4HL 



What happen*i lo your community re- 
peater when a storm or accident caus- 
es a loss of cojnmcicial power? The answer 
is that your repeater is u.selcss unless yuu 
have a battery backup supply or a generator. 
Generators are expensive and have to be 
manualSy siarted unless they have a battery 
starter Deep-cycle marine bauerics arc great 
for repealers that draw 10 a^mps of current or 
less. The problem arises when the commer- 
cial mains go dead. The control operator or 
owner must manually switch pt^wcr sources, 
as most repealers are not located where the 
owner or control operator lives. 

J found the answer to this problem with 
the "Foolpruuf Power Controller/' This pro- 
ject consists of a relay which is engaged 
when the commercial mains are supplying 
power to the repeater and auiomatically 
switches over to my deep-cycle marine hai- 
icry when commercial power stops. 1 have 
incorporated a two-color LED into the 
schematic lo indicate visuallv from which 
power source the repeater is being supplied 
power The parts list for this project is as 
simple as possible, with all the parts avail- 
able froin your local Radio Shack: a ?imall 
aluniiniuTi case, tour resistors* one two-color 
LED, a DPDT relay, one relay socket, one 
n>ll of red 18 ga. hookup wire and one roll 
of black 18 ga, htiokup wire. 

The most important thing in the construc- 
tion of this pniject is to maintain the correct 
polarity so as not to damage an> transistors 




F/wro A. The completed conivoUer showing relay, case and LED, 



in the repeater. Fuses can be added to the 
unll for addiiional protection if you wish. 

Construction 

The relay socket is mounted in the alu- 
minum case so that the relay recei\'es proper 




Photo B. The '^FoolprooJ ft n^cr ComroUer* connected to the I3,8~volt DC power supply. 
40 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



cooling and the exposed wiring will be total- 
ly enclosed in the case. The LED can he 
mounted where it can be easily seen: loca- 
tion is nut importaDl. 

After the relay base is mounted, cut a 
length of red hookup wire that will reach 
from the positive lerminal of your l3.S-voh 
power supply to pin 8 of the relay base with 
a jumper from pin 8 to pin 4 of the relay 
base. Cut an equLil letigih oi' black hookup 
wire that will reach the tiegative terminal of 
your power supply and connect this to pins 7 
and 3 on the relay socket. Now cut a piece of 
red hookup wire that will reach from the 
positive terminal an the haitcry^ and connect 
the other end to pin 2 on the relay socket. 
Cut a piece of black hookup wire that will 
reach from the negative terminal on the bat- 
teiy to pin 1 on the relay sockeL Two equal 
black and red pieces of hookup wire should 
be cut that will reach frt^m the relay socket 
to the power supply terminals on the re- 
peater Connect one end of the red hookup 
wire to pin 6 of the relay socket. Connect 
one end of the black hookup wire to pin 5 on 
the relay s<Kkei. The basic wiring of the re- 
lay socket is now complete and the unit will 





NO TUNERS 

NO RADIALS 

NO RESISTORS 

NOCOMPftOMlSe 

SIX EXCELLENT REVIEWS JUST 

DONT HAPPEN BY CHANCE 
CALL US FOR A FREE CATALOG. 

I n Ocrt. 7 J, 1 9&4 ' S«p t 7J J «i£ R| trah 73, 1 BU 

BILAL COMPANY 

137 Minch«st»r Orfvt 

Fl&d&SAnt CoJoTBdo §06 IS 

(719} 6a7^>650 





CVteiE 43 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Subscribe to 

73 Amateur Radio Today 

Call 800-289-0388 



WANT TO LEARN CODE? 



MofS€ Tutor QM IS the answer for the 

quickest and easiest way 

for beginners and experts alike* 

From the moment you si art the easy and speedy 
self loading procedure to the day you reach your 
goal, Morse Tutor QM will gently ociacli you 
ihroug^i Ihe learning process. 

Since \9%1, GGTE has guided nearly 20,000 
hams M\d prc^pedi ve banis around llie world thioug|i 
proven sirutiured lessons and a vari^" of charaaer, 
w ofxi and oon V'ersalion dh i Is. Straigl^ forw ard momis 
make the process simple and fun. 

You select the characters and Morse Tiilnr QM 
will prepare a random character drill with those 
characters. Morse Tutor QM makes it easy to 
create your own drills or import text files. You can 
noiv type what you hear or copy by hand and see, one 
jirte a1 a tinie, what the cofnputer sent or what you 
^ped Pick the Famsworth or the standard method; 
ielect the tone frequ ency most comfortab le for you or 
select your code speed in tenths of a word per minute. 

You are always tn oocnmand. 
Morse Tutor QM uses your internal 

speaker or sound board (certified by 

Creative Labs for all Sound Dlaster 

products) . Axid. if you use a sound board 

the program supjports volume conlroL 
Gd the icflwarc the ARRL scUa and uses to 

create practice and test t^pcs. Morse Tutor QM 

ii approved for VE exaim »t all levels. 



Sound 



BLASTZfT 



AttentKMi Morse Tutor and Mone Tutor .. 

Advanced Edition refiMered useri* :^^§ 

Make sure we have your current addrcis^^^ 

Special upgrade otTers will be jniailed Mhoitly;; 

Don't iida» out^^; 



*3ai^itP ft Oft ^rid^-paEBi^mif 5 wof^ ofJ Syfi^*, 
A Fifi^B 'Qrea^ ffo^r^m-dxs ^f tt w^ b^ ^ft 
was haded Ofidm use wiPkfft f5 mmuP^s. of its anfv^, 
TrMif ns^ fimOf' AX^A^r/ ^Better tkm m^ wiidsst 
etfecMiofmf Batfi^ i d^'t kaw it tf^m a^ It's muck 
hettef tkiis aftif cod^ tdpes * KSiififA//^ 'B^ fdf the hest 
AAorsi Cods^fo^ram / ^^^vy e^ semf I'm m AFM- Vt . * 
Jf3Sf *Tk'B is d aac^^K ^^^ fof this mwwmer 
to l^ff! the AMtse Code, Well worth the prke' W!3, 
A4ixrj(s 



lar all \X>H Ci^nipulcri, Aidilable lliru dealers. 7.1 

(CA resiiknis add 7.75**o tax) lo. 

CC; I K, P O Bojt .1405. Dept MS, 

Newport BeaJi. C A 9265^ 

Specify- 5U nr .1'- inch disk 



Morse Tut<>r gdd is a trademark of GGTE 

Sound Blaster, the Sound Blaster Logo and the Sound Blaster 

Cornpatibil^ logo a^e tr^demart^sof Creative Technology^ Ltd. 



For High Performance in Repeater 
Teciinoiogy, Go witli tiie Leader- 




SPECTRUM 

S-7R Basic Repeater 

• "Stand Alone" 
or use with 
your controller 



l^trttu^ 






10-40 Watt Units 

2M, 222; 440 MHz 

Super Sensitive/Selective Receivers 

Unusually Good Repeal Audio 

Proven Performance throughout 

the World! 




SCR1400 

REPEATER W/150 WT. 2M Amp 

&30A POWER SUPPLY. 

(All Hems available separately) 

Shown in optional cabinet 



Call or write today for details and prices! 
Get your order in A.S. A.P. 
Sold Factory Direct or through Export Sales 
Reps. only. 






/ 



«i— 



For that new Machlne^Spectrum 
makes 2 lines of Repeaters^the 
Deluxe SCR 1400 and the new basic 
low cost S-7R line. 

The S-7R Repeaters maintain the 
quality of design, cempenents and 
construction which have made Spec- 
trum gear famous thioughout the| 
world for years. 

However, all of the "bells & whistles" 
have been eliminated — ata iarge cost] 
savings to you! The S*7R is a real 
"work-horse" basic machine designed 
for those who want excellent super-re- 
liable performance— buf no fnfts! For 
use as a complete "stand-alone" unit, 
or with a controller. 

Of course^ If you do want a Full Fea^ 
tured/Super Deluxe Repeater with 
Full panel metering and controls^ and 
a complete list of 'built-in' options^ 
then you want our SCR 1400 — the 
new successor to the "Industry Stan- 
dard'' SCR 1000/4000. 

AvallabiB with Autapatch/RBverse 
Patch/Landllne Control; TouchTone 
CoaUvi of various repeater functions; 
'PL'; ''Emergency PwrJiD; High/Low 
TX Power; Tone & Timer Units; Sharp 
RX Fiiters; Power Amps, etc* 



1 



■ Complete Line of VHF/UHF Rcvr. 
& Xmtr. Linic Boards & Assemblies 
also available. Plus ID, COR, DTMF 
Control Bds.r Antennas, DuplexerSp 
Cabinets, etc. Inquire. 



SPECnm CmMUHICMTIOHS CORP. 



ORCLE 1 93 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



CfRCLE S1 on REAOER SERViCE CAf© 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 41 



RepealerPmr 



- Deep 
— ' Cycle 



Regulated 

Pouier 

Supply 



7-1 



S 




2 Cofar LED 
foiuer Source 

Inificalor 



Figure L Schematic for the 'Foaipwoj Power Conifolien " 




Photo C The power contrvller m senice in a repeau viem. ready 
when commercial power fails, to s%%wh insiamly to the emergency 
battery supply. 



opefate iscarecily, However, you would not 
have any indicaiion which power source is 
operating the repealer. 

Mount the two-color LED into the cabinet 
of the case where it can be seen easily. 
Connect the center or long post of ihe 
LED lo pin 5 of the relay socket. Connect 
pin I » ihe shortest post of the LED, to pin 4 
of ihe relay socket through two resistors 
(270- and 330-ohtn resistors in 
scries). Connect pin 3, the next 
shortest post on the LED* to pin 2 on 
the relay socket through two resistors 
(270- and 330-ohni in series). When 
in operation the LED will display 
green when operating from your 
regular l3.8-volt power supply and 
orange when operating from the deep- 
cycle battery. When coiiimercia! pow- 
er is lost, the relay will switch to the 



battery automatically. 

Before hooking this unit to a repeater, 
connect this controller to Ihe proper post of 
the power supply and to the battery. Cunncci 
a multitester to the black and red hookup 
wires that go to the repeater, carefully ob- 
serving polarity with the meter set to read at 
least 30 volts. The LED should be glowing 
orange without the power supply turned on. 





Parts List 




Quantity 


ttein 


RSf 


\ 


Case 2*3/4- X 2^1/8" xl'Sa* 


270-235 


1 


Relay 


275*218 


1 


Relay socKet 


275>220 


1 t 


Dua *CDlor LED In panel holder 


276^025 


2 


270-ohm resistors 


271*1112 


2 


330-ohm res stors 


£71-1113 


1 roll 


Black 18 ga. stranded hookup wire 





Turn on the power supply and the LED 
should glow green. If you unplug the power 
supply, the LED should again reiurn lo or* 
ange and voltage should still be present to 
the nuikiiesler. 

Stick-on rubt^er feet can be added to the 
case after construction to keep the unit from 
sliding around. 
This unit has worked for me for several 
months during short commercial pow- 
er outages. It will keep your repeater 
operating and useable. 

This unit can be adapted to control 
the power sounce of radios other than 
repeaters. The main limiting factor is 
the current-carrying capacity of the 
relay contacts and the hvi^ of the 
hookup wire. 

The total cost to construct this 
project is less than $25, 



CALL ROSS 208-852-0830 



WE TAKE TIME TO TALK TO YOU 



We're Stocked To The Ce 



iyp-20 «« 

PK4U^1FM ^ U5.00 

Hfl-1 i^ _ 20.00 

CP-lO0..„ „ a«.89 

MP'64.,... _... 90.00 

PfcM .„. 1 95 00 

rl^'lZ •■li.i.MlilHHHMM.i^E.F ]12.5V 

HL-4d .r..i.i.u..i.b.<._^. Z24.S0 

vas-ra ,.,„..._„.^ 380.00 

ffmOARD 

CSmOA ^ S794,S0 

C$±iA 41150 

AS1MCM 

Rf'dSAi., 187 90 

Pi^JK t4ajQG 

RU^OSi 2£r JO 

HS-Jl mm 

MMM 2Z2i» 



OMilT — 
DH-tiiT- 

w i20onr 
on-ttiT- 



336,« 

Z7g.S0 

™.™™„ iMM 
, 6SO.O0 

Gn-900T(Bt ....^^__ 57T.n 
ESP 12NA ..-.^.. 52.00 



ir^tise 






SI ^250 

_4l« 



tMoam 

^SDQjOO 



^^•nw^ 









■^^^■"fWW^Bf^^" 



401 



tlKLOO 



■'■"■!■!■■■■'■" '^ 



EDC^ 

EJ-HJ .... 

EiyiS42 

YAESU 

FTJiatise... 

FT510066 .,.. 

FT51R 

FT 703fl ..._.. 



Fr-7«T 



....^OQ 

....45J0 
.... 4&M 

£324 00 
.29&-00 

. €20.00 

...195 00 

fSOOO 

aoaoo 

350.00 



42& ^...,. ^..-.^.. ...... 2,SOQ.OO 

KENWOOD 
TM-411A S33Q W 



TS.«S 

TM251S . 
TS-4flG8AT 



^HH4IBHrlfli-! 



31100 

40ei0o 

34iD0 
1^3001 00 



TH4m 



m i ni :|20 00 

4moo 

rmn 

n^n 

RSO 



0-lOOOStK 

FT-aoou _ 



45&IB 
30^00 






MOM_ 

c>7m ^« 

2W ^.^^^^^..^.^^^.. 345-X 
K>SmM ..-.._ A03-5D 

(C-234DH jHi-nHHinHHi. tlO.OO 

Iv-sTSn. iiiiHiiHiHiHHi 1i200i00 
tC707 .,.„.. TH.OO 

72S TflO.qo 

lC-72i ,„,■,,■■„ ...mV"^*^ 
759 ,.„.,., l,aQO,00 

C-737 ^ ««- !.i« QO 

f>7^^ ».„.uu, ,, 1. 470.00 

iC-fTQH .^^^^ 2J97S.00 

Afi-t -IQCO 

i«MS ^ T3?0e 

m^ sawe 

At-m - 



Ross Distributing Company 



iling 

acMM ^^^^ M%m 

»*< 300 

aft2__ . 1700 

BP-23^ , ^__ jsm 

cp-i? — ^^ ^-ifm 

Extoe ^ lajD 

DEJA-IA ^,«.. 7T0.W 

rlM-^^Q ■'■:,-;, _ ^^ ^ 

nWl 'Dp nri...t|.iH.Hfal«HM.Hpi I 4itrUU 
*"'^" .-." .....MliJM'l'H.- lllBO 

fc*-£7„ .., 20.00 

Inni !J|-!i-|JHPt«HHII1HIHI-l -CwVivU 

RC-11,.. ..ao.oo 

IC-UTBa ..L.MMJH-m+.'HH.i 75*00 
vn~3Mi d.4.bH.toM.H_.. 91oLOO 
U?<99aA .^..i.^,,,.,,,.! mufio 

tt-wa* 

Kum 

MM ISOOO 

KAMPUjS aoaod 

mtMSGFTCS* . 4000 
MrmftSCFT VC-20 JO 00 

100& vAf^rcR ukm 



RO, Box 234, 7S South SiaTe Street, Prestofi, Idaho 03263 
TcJe photic 20S'a&2-OB30 



* Hours 

9 00 2 0(1 Monddvs 




The Only Mat&riaJ That WID Adhem W 
Potyvinyl or Vmyj Outer Coax Jactets^ 



Fofms around and geaJs 
Ddd'Sh aped fittings. 
Ncn^contaminaijng a/id non- 
conductive. 

Wide ambi^ni lemperalure range 
('30' F to +180'" F). 

Stays liexihie for years insuring 
moisture-proof conneclbns. 
RegsflWi— qiiicK disconnection 
and resaaiing with same materiar 
A musi for satellite TV- 
micro wave work. 
Hundreds of usfis. 
Uaiatufflprooi^^l connections. 




■pfpfi* In 4(ipty. TTifitWB ^ 
d pIAsEic. 'Map tQ cov? 
t«tt»r4 lifll-n^. Arrsf 
WIppnQ. (WW lo ^strn a 

fldiooii iui4k« vd Iota ' 

out til- 

EFFGCmVE 



IMXPSfiFVt 



I 
I 

I 



CIRCLE 2M ON READER SERVICE CARD 



EVERY LNB AND COAXIAL 
CONNECTOR NEEDS COAX-SEAL 

(Trial packet for 4 connectors- 51.00 ppd^ 



UMiVERSAt ELECTRONICS, INC. 

4SS5 CiO¥*S Rostf. Suite 1Z ColumbU^L. OH 43232 
Phofie (614) eE$-4&05 - FAX tGlJ) 66S-ia0l 



CIRCLE 32 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



42 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



PERFORMA NCE 



ntennas 

Sirio has designed the new HI 
PERFORMANCE Une for the discriminating 
Radio Amateur. These antennas are the very 
best available in terms of material quality^ hi- 
tech design and maximum performance* The 
result of years of experience and technological 
research by Sirio! All models are fabricated 
with the very best materials available to 
guarantee maximum strength and best 
performance. Year after year. Sirio whips are 
very flexible and incorporate a custom 
inclination system that allows them to be tilted 
to 90° without the use of keys or special tools. 



Rio 



An innovative approach has been taken in 
the construction of the base impedance 
matching transformers. This new process 
results in very high and previously 
unattainable unit to unit precision. 
Particular attention has also been paid to 
the UHF male antenna mounting 
connector which uses a gold-plated center 
pin, "TEFLON®" insulation and a rubber 
weather seal for hi -performance and 
protection from the elements. All Sirio 
HP Antennas are factory adjusted and no 
additional tuning is normally required. 



1. Hi Quality 17/7PH 
stainless steel whip* 

2. Tiltable section with 
rubber gasket and 
stainless steel retention 
spring 

3- Dielectric low-loss 
"ZYTEL" insulator with 
brass insert soldered at 
the coil 

4. High "Q" air wound 
coil for low dielectric loss 
5* High voltage ceramic 
capacitor for a perfect 
impedance matching 

6« Gold plated brass 

center pin with low 

dielectric loss '^TEFLON 

insulator 

7* Silicone rubber gasket 

and O-Ring for a perfect 

waterproofing 



Flectronic Distributors 
325 Mill St. 
Vienna, Va. 22180 
PH 703-938-8105 

Exclosive Distrihiititrs for North &. So. Amerk-a 



Number 12 on yoyr Feedtiack card 



K4SYU Loop Antenna 

A compact, portable HF solution. 



by Everett James K4SYU 




ly a small h&p^ Why not a dtpole or 
a quaner-wavc veniciU ? Tlie answer is 
size and versatility. The loop is small lind in- 
conspicuous. It cun he set up on Ihe porch of 
a eonclominiuili or used us a poikible anlcn- 
na for Fiekl Day or used iis an emergency 
anlenna in ca&e ihe wtre antennas blow 
down. 

The loop will no! replace your favorite 
yagi or other gain antenna, hut if you are re- 
stricted, as many hams are, to using inside 
antennas and are geuing poor results, then 
ihis loop is jusi what you are looking fon 

Let's look al what this small loop antenna 
has to offer: 

t. k requires no radials (no external wires). 
2, It requires no ground connection (reduced 

RFl). 
3^ It requires no antenna tuner (simplified 

[yne-upK 

4. It exhibits less noise than a dipole or quar- 
ter-wave antenna. 

5. It is somewhat directional (also has good 
nulls). 

6. It helps eliniinaic harmonic radiation 
(high Q). 

7. It is miillihand (quick and easy band 
change, live bands), 

8. It is fairly efficient (good things do come 
small). 

9. h is portable tcan tit in the trunk of a 
carj. 
10. It is inexpensive and easy to build. 
(Need I say more?) 
Are you interested? Then read on. 

Theorj^ 

You all know that the loop anicnna has 
been used for many yeais as a direction- 
finding antenna. In that type of service it 
made use of the sharp nulls off each side of 
the ItKjp, but off each end is a nice fat lobe 
shaped like a doughnut, k is this large lobe 
structure that makes the kx>p so inieresting 
to radio amateurs. 

In theory, the loop antenna can be looked 
at as a single-turn paralleUtuncd circuit not 
unlike the tank circuit. The opposite sides of 
Ihc loop act as a pair of spaced antennas car- 
rying RF currents of opposite pcitarity. The 
two RF currents iL^nd to cancel each other 
out perpendicular to the plane of the loop. 
The magnetic radiation will be maximum off 
each end of the kx>p. As the loop readily ac- 
cepts energy at its resonant frequency, it is 

44 73 Amateur Radio Today * May. 1 995 



only necessary to 

add an RF coupling 
device to transfer 
energy to and from 
the kxip via a coaxi- 
al cable. 

You know that the 
portion of the loop 
next to the capacitor 
has very high volt- 
age, but if we go to 
a point halfway 
around the loop 
which is about the 
center of a corre- 
sponding one-turn 
coik we reach a zero 
voltage point. This 
point for all practi- 
cal purposes, is neu- 
inil. ll is at this point 
that the coaxial 
shield is attached. 

The coaxial center conductor is connected 
to a number 12 wire which is separated 
slightly from the loop and connected al a 
point approximately 10 percent of the loop 
circumference away from Ihe neutral point. 
This is very similar to the old-time method 








Photo A. The loop antenna in pieces before axs€'mi}ly. Assembly time 
is ahoittjive minutes. 



of using a tapped coil for impedance match- 
ing. 

It is interesting that a reasonable match 
can be obtained on all five frequency bands 
using this simple maichtng device, without 
having to move the tap. 



rubing 

Disconnect 




rft 



T-Fitting 
/ Pipe Clamp 



CoaKlat 
Conneclor 



:^ 



45Degree 
Obauis 




1/Z" Tubing 



n 



t 




Tubing 

Di scanned 



Hatching 
Section 



/ 



mood Shaft 



Tubing Caps 
Uiflh Hngle 
Brackets 



t 



n 



I 





'^^^^ — — Beehiue Insulators 

II 



Base 



figiife i, Vle^voffhe K4SyU hop without the tuning capacitor momued. 



' I 



/ 



/ 




Frofn_ 








.. ^v.^i^r^^iW•->^.' 




^ what effect soil pH may 
liave on grounding? 

^ entrance panels are a last 
defense against ligfitning? 

► the facts & fallacies of 
oscilloscope sampling rates? 



fflff- join the more 

tlian 30,000 readers 

and learn from 

The Leader in Ughtning 

& Grounding Solutions 



u 



CORPORATION 

(702) 782-2511 

FAX: (702) 782-4476 

BBS: (702) 782-6728 

2225 Park Place • P.O. Box 9000 

Minden, NV 89423-9000 



CIRCLE 49 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Field Day Beam? 

Tbolc 10 J5, 20. and 41} mei^rHalfSquares on Field Da v. 
They weat up in ihc rrccs as easy as dipoles. A low G5RV 
iDolt care of evenihine clo5« and the mlrSqitam made 
my QRP a bis signal lor the lone hop easi and weii. On 
10 and 15 I thoujbi 1 had a con&uit. Th a HatfSquaref 

10 M 15 M 17 M 10 M 30 M 40 M ^ 

%4Q u^ %46 %sa S6Q tm pXh 

InfoPak SI— Plans: ■fccfcNote 122— S7ppd USA 

AntennasWest ord«f womnt: 

Bo3t 50062-S. Provo UT S4605 801-373-8425 



F 



ORCLE 282 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Say You Saw It In 

73 Amateur Radio Today 



YOURICOMIC-751 

IC-745 and R71 

CAN FAILI 

UNLESS YOU OWN THE WfLLCO fCM1Q24 

NO FAIL RAM WITH 1024 MEMORIES 

AND EXTENDED FREQUENCY LlMITa 

TIME IS RUNNING OUT. 



WIIJjCO Electronlea 
RO. Box 788 
Nf^w Ijftnox, ILi 

U.S.A. 60451 

PH (8 1 5) 723-1874 FAX («1 5> 723-1436 




CIRCLJE S4 OK READER SERVICE CARD 



Sell your product in 73 Amateur Radio Today! 
Call Dan Harper today •.,1-800-274-7373 



SG-230 Smartuner 



Antenna Coupler 

S^,AM,OT&DAIA 






Yoli caul buy a smarter 
tuner tlian tfak. An aMtomatic 
antenm oHqikr so InieUigcnt U 
precisely tiine^ any leftgUi anteima 
-^tDSOfi-m the HF hand 

Tbe Smanuner" aulomadcally 
efahi^^es and switches 64 input and 
32 output capacitance cocnbinalions. 
phis 256 inductance ajmbination^ in 
a ^pi" networic. Tlic* ama^n^ result is 
over a half-tnllHon dif f^Tenl ways to 
ensure a perfixi match fcr your transcehrer And Ihc 
most intelligent feature of all is that the Smartunefr 
remembenj the ch<fsen frequency and tuniiufi values, 
and wil autonuilicilly reselect thosf: values -in less 
than 10 ms» each time you Iransmit on thai frequency* 

The SG-230 Iwnanunei.* Buy msrl 









^oJ^* ^^ 



.D*^' 









TEStCMJ- 



^ffe*^iS^ 



kTf? 



ssr/issi;"'^ 



^■Ti"* 



'U3. 






I H S I D E 



MOOPSOCESSOFCOyrROlLED • NON-VOLATILE MLMORY • WATIRPBOOF • BlIE INDiCATOIl • UTO 30MHZKAKG£ 
lOTO 150 WATBWPn POWEJi • IftnS REIUWSClM • « to 801 AVTOiM^^ptd 



J- * *. 



COMMUNlCfflONS 

SGC INC, sec BiraNHG RO. BOX 3526 BELLEVUE, WA 98009 TEL (206) 74«aiO FAI- (206) 746^6584 

CIRCLE tea ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1 995 45 




Neutral 



Radiation 




MaK 
Badiation 



Figure 2. The hop 's mdimhn pafienh 



Photo B. The hop anienna^ showing the maiching section and coaxi- 
ai cable feed point at the top. 




B 





-^ !2- 15" \^- 

Matching 

Section 
Tubing 

Disconnect 




Tuning 
Capacitor 
Sptlt-Stator 
7 to 30 pF 



Photo C. Details oflhe hfop antenna base. 



Figure i. Plan of the K4SYU hop. 



Bands 

This loop covers the 15, 17, 20, 30, and 
40 meter bands. That is not bad for an [inien- 
na which can be set up on a table top and 
take up not much more space than tn e feeL 

CaQ a Loop Antenna Tius Small Be 
Efficknt? 

The answer Is yes. This antenna was de- 
signed with the idea of operating it QRR 
The calculated maximum gain for this loop 
on 20 meters is approximately 3.2 dB above 
tsotmptc. Il also has nulls of approximately 
12 dB off each side. Calculated losses below 
100% efriciency are 0.13 dB for 21 MHz, 
0,4 dB lor 14 MHz, and 3.2 dB for 7 MHz. 

The gmxl news is that this loop will not 
cost you a bundle. The construction of this 
loop is simple enough that any radio ama- 
teur with ordinary mechanical skill and sim- 
ple tools can build it. How about cost? I 
would estimate that the cost would be less 
than 35 dollars. Not bad for a five-hand an- 
tenna! ]| could be even less if you have a 
good junk box. The half-inch hard drawn 
copper tubing and fittings cost me Sll al the 
local plumbing supply shop. The variable 
capacitor iind beehive ceramic insulators 
were obtained at a hamfesi for a few dollars^ 



and the wooden stand was made out of scrap 
lumber. Yoo can make yours real fancy if 
you desire. 

You say you want a loop antenna but you 
do not want lo be confined lo QRP? Look no 
further: this small loop will handle power 
outputs up to 1 00 watts peak. The tuning ca- 
pacitor thai 1 am using is a medium-power 
irLmsmiiling type with 0.075-inch spacing 
between plates. The two stators are in series 
through the roton which gives a plate spac- 
ing of 0.15 inches but cuts the effective ca- 
pacity in half. This spacing will handle more 
than I Ok volts of RE 

Using a splii-siaior capacitor with each 
siator connected to one end of the kK>p. the 
RF voltage on the rotor and frame is near ze- 
ro and the frame can he attached dircciiy to 
the wooden base. The capacitor can he tuned 
using a good bakelite knob as shown in Pho- 
to D. Of coursi:. if you wani^ you may add a 
motor drive. 1 do not recommend using a 
non-split'Staior capacitor as the rotor will be 
al a high RF potential and there is a danger 
of RF bam. The inductance of this loop is 
approximately 5 jiH. If you have a capacitor 
and you know its valuc> just u.se the formula 




lo find your frequency coverage at maxi- 
mum and minimum capacity. 

Tune-Up 

The tune-up is very easy, Ri^t, select the 
band on which you wish to operate, then 
resonate the loop. When the loop is near 

resonance she received noise level and sig- 
nals will peak. 

You could operate with this tune-up but 
you probably would not get maximum pow- 
er transfer. I recommend that you use a 
VSWR meter in the transmission line. Set 
the VSWR meter for reflected power, reduce 
the dri%'c level at the transceiver until re- 
flected power is mid-scale or less, then ad- 
just the loop tuning capacitor for minimum 
return power. Increase power and rc-adjust 
again for minimum. You should now have 
maximum power transfer for ihat segment of 
the band as allowed by your loop bandpass. 
Tune-up should not take much more than a 
minute if your rig is located near the Ux>p 
antenna. 

High Q and Bandpass 

Tlic high Q of the loop will work both for 
and against us. It will help reduce the re- 
ceived noise and it will attenuate harmonic 



46 73 Amateur Radio Today • May. 1 995 



h\ 



R-610T 



SIMPLY MOBILE 

The New Alinco DR-610T Dual Band Mobile Transceiver 



esigned for convenience* The DR-610T's Channel 
I Scope gives you visual monitoring capability to 
keep you engaged in local frequency activities* 
A built-in duplexer and a new remote mount system 
provide you with flexible installation options with a 
readily detachable front head, and the optional EDS-1 
accessory junction box containing both separate microphone 
and external speaker jacks. 

Multi-Color Control Panel Displav 



A color-coded sequence of green and amber lights 
controlled by the function button illuminates the 
DR-610T's control panel indicating a change in your 
operational setting. The DR-610T clearly outshines the 
competition by giving you simple and direct access to 
complex dual band applications. 

Efficient Memory Storaee with a ''5 Bank System" 



The 120 memory channels that come standard with this 
new^ dual-bander are conveniently divided into 5 separate 
memory banks for Hams who traverse through multiple 
operating areas. Program up to a total of 240 channels 
with the optional Alinco accessor)' EJ-23U memory unit. 

LITZ EmerEencv Alert System 



To activate the Long Tone Zero (LITZ) emergency alert 
system, a repeater controller presses the touch tone "0" on 
his or her mic for a period longer than 3 seconds. The 
repeater will re-transmit this DTIvLF tone which will be 
decoded by the DR-610T's special LITZ decoder. A beep 
sound emits from the speaker repeatedly and the "Lit" 
icon will appear in the display until the station operator 
depresses any of the control panel keys. 




-t' Frequency Range 

Jt= Receive: 108.000" 171995 MHz (AM, FM) 
4m000- 470,000 MHz (FM) 

H= Trafismit 144,000- 147.995 MHz fFM) 
4ffl.OOO" 449.995 MHz (FM) 

^ji Myftipte Scan Functions 

>I= Prionty Fundioii 

■^ Wooo Band Dual Receive(VxV) (UxUj 

^ 5 Qiann^ Scope levels 

sj; SO cress Tones, Encode standard, Decode available with 

the optional accessory EJ'24U Tone Squelch UnrL 

=KS'meter Squelch 

=HRF Attenuator 

'1: APO (Automatic Power Off) 

=j' TOT [Time Out Timer) 

;K 1200/9600 bps packet capable (GMSK type TNC required) 

A' AM Aircraft RX Standard (No modifk:atlon required) 

^ Full Duplex with odd split operatjon 

^ Sub-band Mute fundion 

:;: 3 Powef Output Uv«ls (VHF/UHF IrHlependenl) 

^ DSO (Digital Squeldi) 

^k Beep liffidiofi 

i:^ Key lock function 

^ Butttnn Duplexef 

=:= Remote Microphone Control Application 

ij^ Bejj Function 

-1= Tone Burst Function 

'h LITZ Function 
(The US First Emergency Alert Monitoring Feature) 

H- MARS/CAP Modifial>ie (Proper FCC licensing require^fl 

Ths devToe r^ nd beoi approved t>^ Federal Gorrnui^^ 

Con»rii^i(yt llis Mts is rvl and rr^ not be, of^^ 

or hAJ or leased ifti lie 4p(VDiQl d ihe F€C ^l»en G&tainedl 



^^H 




S; 



iippyTIi^ 



3 It I* MW 



ALtHCO VHf/UMf IWlii iAMO FM TRAN5CF1VER DR~6!0 



ff 






'r^- 



PWB 



SOL 



I 



rs 




•1i 



CALL 



rufj^ «i m mi m ca dsii 



mpu a M cg^ ^ B 




SCAN 



SHFt 



ATT 




ALmco 

ELECTRONICS INC. 




438 Amapola Ave, #1 30, Torrance. CA 90501 Phone: (31 0) 61 8-861 6 / Fax: (31 0) 61 8-8758 
Better Products, Better Service. See for yourself why people are corning to ALINCO, 



CIRCLE £7 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 




Photo D. Dekiiis oj the split skUtft tttnhi^ aipaciior, the heeitivt' uisih Photo E. The loop auil h^ set up on a picnic table in a North Georgia 
laiors, and ihe plug-in 40 meter capacitor, part 



radiation. It will nol allow us lo move up 
and down Ihe hand without re-resonaling the 
l(K5p lo the new operating frequency. 

The fo I towing bandpass figures were 
measured using this loop: 

Band Bandpass 

15 meters 138 kHz 

17meiers Noimeasured 

20 meters 57 kHz 

30 meters 23 kHz 

40 meters 15 kHz 

These baiidpiiss figures indicate the limits 
between 2 J: J VSWR points for each band, 
[t is easy lo see that as the frequency de- 
creases the bandpass becomes smaller, the 
tuning of the ltx)p becomes more critical and 
the efficiency also decreases. 

I ha veil* I enctmntered any problems thus 
far itl maiutally Liining this loop, as the loop 
is operaled next to the transceiver, [f the 
loop is 10 be operated at a localion at a dii»- 
tancc frojii the rig, then a mt>lor drive mc- 
chanica) tuner will be required. 

Construction 

As you can see in Figure 3. the kn'jp an- 
tenna is octagon-shaped, hut is a little shon- 
er than it is wide. This was done in order to 
provide clearance from the ceiling when op- 
erated from a tabletop. 

About 16 linear feel of half-ioch hard- 
drawn copper lubiiig is required. Using a 
tubing cutter or hacksaw, cut the tubing to 
the lengths shown in Figure 3. Clean the 
portions of the tubing to be soldered, using 
emery cloth. Also clean the interior of all lU- 
lings. Make two copper angle brackets and 



attach diem to ihe two copper pipe caps with 
self-tapping screws. CJcan the caps and 
brackets for soldering. 

Lay the parts out (lat on a concrete tloor 
Use acid soldering flux on all joints and as- 
semble the loop. Use wooden blocks lo raise 
the loop abo> e the level of the floor keeping 
it Hat for soldering. Use a propane torch and 
heat the fittings one at a time. Use lead-tin 
solder the same as is used in radio work. 
The solder will be drawn into each joint 
when hot enough. You may wipe excess sol- 
der off using a damp cloth if you wish. 

Note the pL^sition of the copper T-fltting 
(Figures 4 and 5) at the top of the loop. It is 
used as the upper support, as it fits into a 
hole in the vertical suppt^rt shaft. 

When all of the tubing joints are soldered 
the loop should look like the plan drawing in 
Figure 3. The loop will be rigid and have no 
loose joints. Make a vertical wooden shaft 1- 
iy2"xl-l/2"x52Mong, 

Make a 14" % 18" wocxlen base as shown 
in Photo A. Make a wooden support for the 
vertical shaft to hold it at right angles to the 
base. 

A copper bracket is required for the 
SO- 239 coax fitting* It may be screwed or 
soldered to the copper T- fitting as desired. 
Mount the beehive insulators on the wooden 
base along with the split siator capacitor. 
Fasten parts down with wood or sheet metal 
screw^s using brack- 
ets as needed on the 
capacitor frame. 

Make connectors 

out of copper strip 

T- Fitting 



lo go between the insulator tops and the ca* 
pacitor stators. Try to have these connectors 
tis short as fjossible. 

The loop as presently set up will cover the 
15, 17t mid 20 meter bands. In order to nes- 
onaie it on the 30 and 40 meter bands, addi- 
tional capacitance must he added in parallel 
w iih the existing split-staior variable capaci- 
tor This is done by attaching two banana 
jacks to the top of the beehive insulators. 
Fixed plug-in capacitors can then be added 
in order to work the 30 and 40 meter bands, 

Conslniction of the Fixed Capacitors 

The fixed capacitors arc made of double- 
sided copper printed circuit board using air 
as a dielectric. The printed circuit board is 
cut into platen which are stacked in such a 
way as to make a high-voliagc capacitor 

Figtire 6 j^hows the size and shape of the 
fixed capacitor plates. Three plates are used 
for the 30 meter capacitor; six for the 40 me- 
ter capacitor. The approximate Lapacity of 
the 30 meter capacitor is 30 pF; 75 pF for 40 
meters. 

All plates nm cut with a large pair of tin 
snips. 

The plates are then stacked and holes 
drilled to accept tw^o 6-32 screws. Remove 
the copper from around the hole on one end 
of each plate. As we arc using doubk-stded 
printed circuit board, the ctjpper must be 





lUooden tlBrtical Shaft 



Looplubing 



CoaK Fitting 



Figure 4. Base bracket detail 



Figure 5. Capper T-fitting detail, fop view. 



4a 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 




r 










Nail liJith Head Cut Off 








Size To Fit Hole 

Bored far 6-32 Screui ' 


u 



Figure 6. Demi! of fixed cnpachar pfaies. 



Figure 7. Detail of grinding lOoL 



removed from around the same hole on both 
sides. This can be done quickly hy grinding 
the copper away using a hoincinaUe tool in 
iin electrical drill or drill press (Figure 7). 

hasten a smiill strip of emery cUnh to ihe 
grinding tool, passing the nail through the 
emery doih. Insert nail in one side of the 
printed circuit board in the drilled hole, and 
rotate the tool u^ing an electric drilL The 
copper will be removed quite rapidly. 

Stacking the Capacitor Plates 

Rcrcrriiig 10 Figure 8. you can see that on 
the left-hand terininnl plates 1 and 3 are con- 
nected while the righi-hand terminal is con- 
nected only to plate 2. A common 6-32 nut 
is placed on the screw between each plate 
and on top of the slack of plates. TTiis gives 
a spacing of about OJ inch. 

Loop .Inf enna Tubing Diseonnects 

For those radio amaietirs who intend to 
use the loop as a portable antenna or fre- 
quently move it from one place to another, it 
can be equipped with tubing discuiiiiects. 
The loop will then break down into three 
seeiions of no more than four l^et in overall 
Icngdi. which \\\\\ allow it to he easily car- 
ried in the trunk of a can The tubing is cui at 
the two tubing disconnect points, A brass in* 
sen is made with a cood fit to the interior of 
the tubing. It is soldered into one section 
and. with the loop assembled, a hole is 
drilled through the mating tubing section. 
The brass insert is then tapped for a screw 
thread, A 6-32 or 8-32 screw, as available, 
can be used to secure the sections of the 
loop together and make a gtx)d mechanical 
and electric^il connection. 

A word of caution: This hH>p concep* 
ir^cs very high levels of magnetic radiation 
and should be kept away from people and 
metal objects, both of which will absorb en- 
ergy IMs could cause a hazard. 

ConclusioD 

For the past six months, Fve used this 
loop imtenna every Tuesday iji a mini-Field- 
Day operation lo make contact on schedule 
with W2GL1M in New Jersey on 20 meter 
CW. Signal repons have frcqucnti> l>ccii S9, 
even with poor band conditions. Some of the 
contacts were made using QRB The setup as 
shown in Photo E is portable from a park in 




Figure i*f. Stacking the capacitor plates. 



North Georgia, My rig is a Ten-Tec Argosy* 
lis output is either 5 or 50 watts, depending 
upon whether I want to operyic QRP. The 
antenna has helped make many contacts on 
15, 20, 30, and 40 meters. Most of the oper- 
ation has been portable battery-powered 
from a city park in Melbourne, Florida. The 
loop has also performed very well on DX 
contacts. 

We have a small QRP club, and two other 
members, W4MFf and N4MPD, have built 



loops from these plans. Both are very happy 
with the results. 

My recommendation is, try ii, you will 
like it. 

For more information see the Ted Hart 
W5QJR article in the June I9S6 issue of 
QST. I would like to thank Burt Bitiner 
K0WQN for his suggestions and computer 
tab-onis modeling this antenna. For loop 
theory, see Elecironic and Hadio Etigineer* 
ing by Tcmian, 



Parts List 



a 
1 

2 

T 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 

4 

4 

1B 

1 



Copper elbows 1/2" dia. 

Copper T'fitting MT dia. 

Copper end caps 1/2' dia. 

Hard -drawn copper tubing, t/2" dia. 

Coaxial c»nnector, lemale type 50-239 

BeelTive insulatore 

Alxxjt 2 of Mo. 12 solid copper wi're 

T X 4" copper flashing 

Tuning capacitor, split -sta tor ^n»* 

Wooden base, I"x6'x 14" 

Wooden legs, 1-1/2' x M/2'* x 19" 

Wooden vertical shaft, 1" x M/2" x 51" 

Double^slded circuit board. 3-5/B " x IB'** 

Banana jacks** 

Banana plugs with 6-32 threaded ends" 

Bras& screws, 6-32. V long** 

Nuts 6-32 to faster plates" 

Hose damp, smalJ. stainless steel 



' Note: The sptrt-sfaior capacitor whicfi I used was made by Canlwell, and was removed (rem a plug-in 
unit from a surplus SCR 1S8 MOPA iransmitter The capacitor was not split-stator and it measured about 
30 to 130 pF. The stafor was supported by four insulators attacfwd to me frame, I dilHed and tiled through 
tfie center of the bars holding the statof plates. I removed the center statof plate and made two separate 
slator sections with 3/16-inch spacing between ifie stator bar sections, 

" Note: If you have trouble finding ihe banana plugs and the double-sided prfnted cifctilt board, a 
transmitting type variable capacitor may be substituted and may be connected to the loop tising battery 
dips. Tfie variable capacitor should have a maxiriium capacity of about 100 pR tt does not need to be a 
sptJt-stator type. 

W ths siMwtttutiOfl is made, then aH '* Hems may t>e omitted. 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1995 49 



Carr's corner 



Number 13 on your Feedback card 



Joseph J. CafrK4IPV 

RO. Box 1099 

Falls Church VA 2204 1 

Noise, Signals and Amplfflers 

Although g^fn, bandwidth and the 
shape of the passband are important 
amplifier characteristics, we rr>ust also 
concern ourselves about circuit noise. 
In the spectrum below VHF, man- 
rrtacfe and rvatural atmospherrc noise 
sotirces are so dominant thai receiver 
noise contnlsution is trivial- But ai VHF 
and above, receiver and annpbfier 
nofse sets the perfonnance of Hm sys- 
tem, 

At any tennipefaliire above Absolute 
Zero (0 K Of -273" C) eleclfons in any 
material are in constant random mo- 
tion. Because of ttie inhefent random- 
ness of that motion, however, there is 
no deteclabte current in any direction, 
In other words, electron drUt ir\ any 
single direction ts cancelled over short 
time by equal drift in the opposite df- 
rection. There Is, however^ a continu- 
ous series of random current pulses 
generated in the material, and those 
pulses are seen by the outside world 
as a noise signal. This signal is called 
by several names: thermai agnation 
notse. ff^ennal noise or Jotrnson noise. 

It Is important to understand what 
we mean by moise' m this context. In 
a communications system \hB design- 
er may regard all unwanted signals as 
'tioise," including man-made electrical 
spark signals and adjacent channei 
communications signals, as weli as 
Jolinson noise. In other cases, the 
harmonic content generated In a linear 
signal by a non-linear network could 
bB regarded as 'noise," But in the con- 
l|)(t of amplifiers and receivers. 
Iriolse" usually refers to thermal agita- 
lion noise. 

Amplifiers and other linear net- 
works are frequently evaluated using 
ih© same methods, even mough the 



two classes appear radically different. 
In the generic sense, a passive net- 
wort^ is merely an amplfflef with nega- 
tive gain or a complect transfer tunc* 
tion. We witi consider only amplifiers 
here, but keep in mind that the materi- 
al herein also applies to other forms of 
circuits as well. 

Amplifiers and receivers are evalu- 
ated on the basis of signaMo-nvise ra- 
tio (S/N Of ''SNR"). The goal o( the de- 
signer is to enhance the SNR as much 
as posstile. Ultimately, the minimum 
signal detectable at the output of an 
amptiHer is that %vhich appears above 
the noise level. Therefore, the lower 
the system no<se. ttw smaller the m*rw- 
mum deteciat^ signal (MDSJ* 

Noise resulting from thermat agita- 
tion of electrons is measured in lemns 
of noiSe power (P^), and carries the 
units of power (watts or its sub units). 
Noise power is found from: 



P„ = KTB 



(EqijatJon 1 ) 

Where: 

P„ is the noise power in watts fW). 

K is Soitzmann's constant 

(1.38)c10-^J;K). 
B is the bandwidth m fieitz (Hz), 

Notice in Equation 1 thai there is no 
center frequency tenri, only a band- 
width. True th»ermal noise ts gaussisn, 
or near-gaussian, in nature, so fre- 
quer^ content, pfrase and amptiludes 
are equally distributed across the en- 
tire spectrum. Thus J n bandwidth limit- 
ed systems, such as a practical amplU 
tier or network, the total noise power Is 
related only lo temperature and band- 
width We can conclude that a 20 MHz 
bandwidth centered on 200 MHz pro- 
duces the same thermal noise level as 
a 20 MHz bandwidth centered on 400 
MHz or some other frequerx:y. 

Noise sources can t>e categorized 
as erttief internal or external. The *rv 



r 



^- 



r 





Figure 1. Equivsieni cifvultofan ampUim with noise source. 
50 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



ternal noise sources are ^ue to ther- 
mal currents fn the semiconductor ma- 
terial resistances. It is Ihe noise (^m- 
porrent contnbuted by the ainptifier un- 
der consideration. If noise, or S^ ra- 
tio, is measured at both input and out- 
pot of an amplifier, the output rK>ise is 
greater. TTie internal rwise of the de- 
vice is Ihe difference betweert output 
noise level and input noise level. 

External noise is the no»se pro- 
duced by the signal source, so is 
sometimes called source noise. This 
noise signa! Is due to thermal agitation 
currents In the signal source, and 
even a simple zero-signal input termi- 
nation resistance has some amount of 
thermal agitation noise. 

Bolh types ol rroise generator are 
shown sctiematicalfy in Rgure t. Hers 
we model a microwave amplifier as an 
ideal noiseless" amplifier with a gain 
of G. and a noise generator at the in- 
put. This noise generator produces a 
noise power signal ai the input of the 
ideal amplifier Although noise ts gen- 
eraled throughout the amplifier device, 
it is common practice to model all 
noise generators as a single input -re- 
ferred source. This source is shown as 
voltage V, and current I,. 

Noise Factor, Noise Figure and 
Noise Temperature 

The noise of a system or network 
can be defined in three different but 
related ways: notse factor {F„), noise 
figure (NF) and equivalent noise lem- 
perakffe (T,); these properties are de- 
finable as a ratio, decitjel or tempera- 
lure, respectively. 

Noise Factor (F„)i The noise fac- 
tor is the ratio of output noise power 
(P^^^) to input noise power (P^): 



P^ = GKT„B 



nj 



(Equation 3) 






390" K 



(Equation 2) 



In order to make comparisons easi- 
er the noise factor is always mea- 
sured at the standard temperature 
(T^) 290 K (otfrcial room tempera- 
ture). 

The input noise power P^^ can bo 
defined as the product of the source 
noise at standard temperature (T^) 
and the amplifier gain; 



(t is also posslbte to define noise 
factor F„ in tenns ot output and input 
S/N ratio: 

(Equation 4) 



SNR 



out 



whk:h Is also: 



F„ = 



TTC* 



KT„BG 



(Equatior 5) 



Where: 

SNR,r^ is the input signal-to-noise ratfo. 

SNR^f is the outpul signal to-noise ratio- 

P„^j Is the output noise power in watts (W). 

K is Boltzmann's ooostanl 
(138X1023J/-K). 

T^ is 2^ degrees Kelvin ( KJ. 

B is ttie oetwofft bandwidth in hertz (Hz). 

G is the arapPer gain. 

The rKiise factor can be evaluated 
in a mociel ttiat considefs the amplifier 
Ideal, and therefore only amplifies 
through gain G the noise produced by 
the "inpuf noise source; 

KT^BG + AN 

(Equation 6} 



F.= 



KT„ BG 



Where: 



AM is tf>e noise added by the network 

or amptifier. 

Alt otfier terms are as defined above- 
Noise Figure (NF): Tfie noise fig- 
ure is a frequently used mea^ire of an 
amplifier's "goodness," or its departure 
from ^idealness.* TTms, it is a figure of 
merit. The noise figure *s the noise 
factor converted to decibel notation: 

NF = 1 LOG(F„) (Equation 7) 

Where: 

NF is the noise figure in decibels (dB). 

Fn is the noise factor. 

LOG refers to the system of base-10 
logarithms. 

Noise Temperature {T^)i The noise 
temperature" is a means (or specifying 
noise in terms of an equivaienl temper- 
ature. Evaluating Equation I shows 



^ 4 



3 





D 



2 - 



jy 



I ^ll i 



TO 



» 






«aDw> 



1 ! lJ 

» faoot 



BDQ IOBD 



Figure 2. Noise figure vs, noise tempefafure. 




thai Ihe noise power is directly propor- 
tional to temperature in degrees 
Kelvin, and also I hat rxHse power coK 
lapses to zero at tJie temperature of 
Absolute Zero fO" K). 

Note tiiat the equivalenr noise tem- 
perature Tg is riot tt^e physfcal temper- 
ature ot tfie amplifier but raiher a the- 
oretical construct that is an equtvaienl 
temperature that produces that 
amount of rotse power. Th© noise 
temperature m related to the noise fac- 
lof by: 



t. = (F„-1JT. 



(Equatiofi 6) 



and to noise figure by; 

T,=l"Af^tnog(J^) -l] KT,, 

L \W / J (Equation 9) 

Now that we have noise temperature 
T^, we can also define noise factor 
ard noise figure in terms of noise tem- 
perature: 

F = " + 1 



(Equatkm 10) 



and, 
NF^IOLOG 



Lt,+iI J 



(Equation IT) 



Noise figure and noise temperature 
are roughly graphed in Figure 2, 

The total noise in any amplifier or 
network is the sum of internally gener- 



Figure 3. Cascade chain of ampfitiefs. 



a ted and externally generated noise. 
In terms of noise temperature: 

P«tioi-jj = GKB(T^ + TJ {Equation 12) 

Wfiere: 

^ntioi-tj is tf*6 *<Wal noise power 

AM other terms are as prevlousty 
defined, 

AltliGugh the equations tend to 
show absolute equivalence and con- 
vertibJlity between F^, NF and T^. 
thiere is sometimes a bit of confusion 
regarding proper practices for optimiz- 
ing an amplifier with regard to match- 
ing the input and source resistances. 
There is an optimum source resis- 
tance for mrnimizing input noise 
power. There is also an optimum 
source resistance for maximum power 
transfer lo the amplifier (sourGa resis- 
tance equals amplifier input resJs- 
lance)- Unfortunately, ttie two optimum 
resistances are rarely tt>e same. Whfte 
impedance matching is useful, some 
[x>mmon tactics are noL 



A tactic used by some designers fs 
to modify the source resistance by 
adding a series or stnjnt resistance lo 
the circuit to bring Ihe total source re- 
sistance seen by the amplifier lo ttie 
oplioium value for noise figure reduc- 
tion Unfortunately, while this tactic Im- 
proves the apparent noise factor, it ac- 
tually deteriorates output signal-to- 
noise ratio, tn the case cited, Ihe noise 
conlribLited by the added resistor (KT- 
BR) increases input noise to a point 
I hat domrnates and masks amplifier in- 
ternal noise. While thai tactic appears 
to improve F„, it actualty does rnsl af- 
fect f„ at all. but it does deteriorate 
oulfHJt signat-to-noise ratio (SNR^^^). 

Noise in Cascade Amplifiers 

A noise signal is seen by a follow- 
Ing amplifier as a valid input signal. 
Thus, in a cascade amplifier {Figure 3) 
the fmat stage sees an inpui signal 
thai consists of ttie orrginal signal and 
noise amplTfied by each successive 



F^ = Ft + "^^ ' + ^- I * "^^-^ 


^-t 


^1 G1 G2 Gl G2 G3 
or, in terms of noise temperature: 

^ '* ^ 6l -gnS G1G2G3 


G1G2G3...G„ , 

T.. -1 

G1G2G3...G,,, 



Figure 4. Fms'nome equation. 



stage. Each stage in the cascade 
chain both amplifies signals and noise 
from previous stages. 3^n^ aiso con- 
tributes some noise of its own. The 
overall noise factor for a cascade am- 
plifier can be caiculated from Friis' 
noise equation. (See Figure 4 ) 

Where: 

F,, is the overall noise figure of N 
stages in cascade. 

T^ IS the Gveratl notse temperalune ol 
N siages m cascade, 

Fl is 11^ noise (actor of slage-1, 

F2 is the noise factor of siage-2. 

F3 is the noise factor of stage-3. 

Ff^ is the noise factor ot the ntli stage. 

T1 is the noise temperature of stage-1. 

T2 is the noise temperature of sfa9e*2. 

T3 IS the noise temperature ol stage^S, 

T^ , is the noise temperature of Ihe 
(n-t}th stage, 

G1 is the gain of slage-t. 

G2 is the gain of stage -2. 

G3 is the gain of stage-3. 

G„ , is the gain of stage (n-1). 

M you can see frditi Equations 1 3 
and 14, the rwise factor or noise tem- 
perature of the entire cascade chain is 
dominated by the r>oise coniribuiion of 
the first stage or two. Typically, high 
sensitivity microwave amplifiers use a 
low noise amplifier (LNA) stage tor on- 
ly the first stage or two in the cascade 
chain because that stage dominates 
all Ihe rest of tt>e chain, 



Say You Saw It In 

73 Amateur Radio Today 



QUICK, EASY, & COMPACT 

Flash cards 'NOVICE ihru EXTPlA' theory Kev words 



iinde rimed. Ovof 4000 sets in use! For begin nef, Of^s, 
XYLs & kids. 



COHEAAJL 

AJMWKES 

mcma 

i DTinon 

due DISCOUhTTS 



n 

1 K-QD 



f 


"■ ; 


r ^ 




*#■ ^ ■ 




* ^r^mmm 





Order Today! 
from 



VIS STUDY CARDS 
-*L« P.O. BOX 17377 

HATTIESBURG, MS 39404 






CIRCLE 104 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



NO ENTERTAINMENT FEE 

TTiafs righl. There ^ never an entertainmont charge ai 
tie Sokfer-fi Bootri (Rochester, NY Bootti f 107). Come 
find see for yoar^f wtiy the reviewers agree thai the 
SokJer-tt Kit makes goldefing Pt'2S^. minteture con- 
necfofs. atuminuim^ and so many oOTer nasty soWering 
jobs 50 easv At Dayton we had a hneup of folks who 
needed emergency soldering jobs,..Monel eyeglass 
Irames for a fellow from Kenwood, a desp on a gold 

bracelet lor a YL harn from fslJ. a 
few PL259a, din pLuga and other 
connectofs for new rrg owners, a 
cracked l-IT case, a pop rnetai toy 
gun for a tsuddirtg cowpoke One 
wcviian fijced a hole m hei iruck 
raiiaior 90 &he could get home. 

THlSSEASYt 

1 




WMSA* 



I 



>;i*!«-:t 



DW SoMw-R *U1 Is atll] S5S.O0 +S4.00 SAH ^Ohici add 7%\ 
S«ndchvck la: SoktAf-lt Box 20100 Cl^wland. OH 44t20 
«0lheV?-9»94 FAX 210^721-3700 W« ahjp wilbin 48 hour* 



Hamfest 



Maker 



If you or your club are looking for a way to make money 
at your next hamfest, here it is! A few months ago we offered 
back issues of Radio Fun which could be sold at hamfests or 
other club events. We got cleaned out in short order. That's 
good because the back issues are far more valuable in ham 
shacks for reference use than in our warehouse. 

Now we've got some 73 back issues which we've saved 
long enough. How'd you like to set up a table and seU back 
issues for $1 each? Send $50 for a box of 100 assorted back 
issues and make a fast fifty bucks profit. Two boxes could net 
you enough in a few minutes for a very nice new antenna. 
How many boxes do you need? These won't last long, so 
decide right now, not next week. 

TTie hamfest season is coming fast, so send a check or cred- 
it card number to 73 Premiums, 70 R202 N, Peterborough 
NH 03458-1107, or caU 603-924-0058 and ask for Sheila. Fax 
603-924-8613. 



CIRCLE 325 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today •May, 1995 51 



Homing in 



Number 14 on your Feedback card 



Joe Moeit RE, KOOV 
RO. Box 25^ 
Fufierton CA 92633 

Good Deeds, Good Fun, 
and Goodwill 

For most of us, Sunday, January 
29, was a day to have a party at home 
and watch the Super Bowl. For 
searcn^rescue crews and a handful oi 
hams m southern Arizona . it was a 
t€Sl of patience and skJHs in radio efi- 
iBCliOfl finding (RDF). 

The night before, a signal had ap- 
peared on a rxjfhham VHF pyWic ser- 
vice repeater south of Tucson. A boy 
caifmg himseff "leo" said Ihai he was 
part ol a group losi in the Madera 
Canyon area north of Nogales One of 
ihe boys had an injured leg^ he said. 
Many agencies, Including the Santa 
Cruz County Sheriff's Department, 
Sania Cruz County Emergency Ser- 
vlcas, and the Arizona Department of 
Put)iic Safety, had responded in full 
force The search was called off Satur- 
day night when Leo stopped talking, 
but he was back on tf>e air again Sun- 
day morning. 

By now, olficiats suspected a fioax. 
They could not hear ttie signal on the 



Radio Direction Finding 



repeater Input. 11 would b^ quite un- 
likely for a civilian to be carrying a ra- 
dio for this emergency service re- 
peater while hJKing, and the signal 
showed no sign of deterioration due to 
battery depletion. Furthermore, Leo's 
answers to questions were vague and 
sometimes conflicted with earlier 
statements, 

At this point Mac McWlltiams, Di- 
rector of Santa Cruz County Emergen- 
cy Services, called the Civ^l Air PalroJ. 
Me kr>ew that CAP has equipment and 
manpower to track emergernry beacon 
signals. (See "Homing In.* April 1994.) 
BIfl Croghan WBGSKW of CAP told 
McWilliams that his agency's RDF 
gear is spectalized for aircraft disiress 
frequencies and thus not usable for 
ihis search. Bill then began to call 
people that he knew could help — ham 
radio transmitter hunters. 

Practice Pays 

Every week at El Con Mall in Tuc- 
son, about a dozen hams meet for an 
RDF contest, usually called a foxhunt 
or T-hunt. In their cars, trucks and 
var^s equipped with BDF gear, they at* 
tempt to win by being the first to find 
ttie *1i«klen V or to tirMj it wrth lowest 




F^Dfo A. Kevin Keify N60AB carne from Thousand Oaks, Caifioma, to be indfi^ 
ua/ Winner of the 1991 foxhunt m Portland, Oregon. 



- Packet Radio - 

Portable & Affordable! 




fvlodel BP-I 
Packet Modem 
Made in USA. 



# Simple Installatloo 

* No External Power 
^ Smart Dog™ Timer 

* Perfect For Porta hie 
^ Assembled & Tested 

• VHF,UHF,HFti»M) 



Whether you're an experienced packeteer or a newcomer wanting to 
explore packet for tlie first time, tiiis is what you've been waiting fori 
Thanks to a breakthrwigh in digital signal processing, we have 
developed a tiny, full- featured, packet modem at an unprecedenteJ 
low price. The BayPac Model BP-l transfornis your PC-compatible 
eomputer into a powerful Packet TNQ 
capable of supporting sophisticated features 
like djgipealing, file tranters, and remote 
terminal access. NOW is the lime far VOU 
to join the PACKET REVOLUTION! 



tmBAtauLB 

J 1 Dcomorated 



400 DaU y Lane 

P.O, Box 5210 

Grants Pass, OR 

97537 




1-800-8BAYPAC 




1-&00-a22'^T22!: 
(503K74S7O0 




'J 



CIRCLE 369 ON READER SERVICE CAUD 

52 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 




A TRhBX TOWBR IS THE ONLY 
TOWER YOU WILL EVER NEEOI 



WT51 $1,050 

LM354HD $1,900 

LM470 $3,658 

Designed to UBC 1991 - 70mph 



cmofimi 
Foum 

CAJAlOOm 



VISA 



'■msT'- 





TOWER CORPORATION 

7182 Rasmussen Ave. * Visalia, CA 93291 

Where engineering and quality come first! 



TO ORDER CALL 

800-328-2393 



TECH SUPPORT 

209-651-7859 



FAX 

209-651-5157 



CIRCLE 22 OH READER SERVICE CARD 



odometer mileage, depending on tlie 
rules set by the hrder tor that hunt 
Typically, two hams form a mobile 
team. 

As a regi^r Tucson T- hunter, Jerry 
Clafk K7KZ ^as one of the first to b% 
called by WB0SKW Jerry immediate- 
ly phoned his hunting partner Bob 
Buchanan KA7CCC and began to in- 
stall his doppler RDF set In his car, "I 
called the Santa Cru^ County Sheriff's 
Department using a (^llutar telephone 
and we were patched through to the 
deputy in clTarge of the seafch/ says 
Bob. "He suggested tf^ai we meel at 
the top of Mount Hopkins.* 

Bob and Jeny headed in that direc- 
lion, agreeing ttrat if ttiey found a track' 
able signal before getting there, they 
would start RDFirrg at that time. ''We 
mel the deputies near the bottom of Mt. 
Hopkins Road/' KA7CCC continues. 
"Up to thai time we had not heard the 
direct signal. The deputy got the boy to 
tall; to him through \he repeater. We 
were still unable to hear him on the in- 
pul, so we concluded thai he was 
nqwhefe in Itie search area, 

'^n a hunch, we decided to drive 
south towards Nogales and then, if r»ec- 
essary, up through Patagonia and 
Sonoita. The deputy continued to coax 
information from the boy and he obliged 
with numerous transmissions. As we 
approached Rio Rico, we started to get 
a strong, unambiguous signal," 

Al the same time, another learn 
of T- hunters began looking for Leo. 
Jason Auverishine M7tJGP and Faber 
Tunison M7ZAZ fiad also been alerted 
by WB0SKW. They headed south to- 
ward Madera Canyon, listening on 
Iheir doppler RDF se! arid also trying 
to hiear the weak 151 MHz signal with 
their 2 meter beam, 

"The directional pattern was not 
great out of band, but the yagi did well 
enough to let us know he was south 
and got us into doppler range,'' Jason 
says. "The deputy in *he fseld did a 
heck of a job commnnicaUng with the 
tx>y ^00 keeping him on the air. I could 
tell he was struggling with it* 

The two teams continued, unaware 
of each other's efforts. At 7:30 p.m., 
Jason and Faber had 10 stop hunting 
due to a previous commitment. Mo- 



ments later, Jerry and Bob pulled up in 
front of the boy's hoyse, jysi as ttie 
transmisskjns abruptly stopped. 

*We went about two mites to an 
easy place to rendezvous and called 
by cell phone io inform the authorilies 
what we found and where they could 
meet us," says Jefry. "A bunch of 
deputies showed up^ and then an 
agent from the FCC. I got into the 
Sheriff's car and Bob got into a car 
with one of ihe emergency service 
workers and we led them to the 
house.' 

Three young persons, ages 18, 14, 
and 13, were arrested and later re- 
leased into the custody of Iherr par- 
ents. TTie 13-year okl was doir»g the 
transmitting," Jason says. *"He was 
alone in his room when caught, with 
an eight channel commercial hand- 
held radio and its charger, which was 
apparently from a home burglary. The 
other two teens had been actively in- 
volved earlfet The l3-year-old's par- 
ents were tfiere and appeared to not 
be aware of the transmissions." 

As you can imagine, the heroic 
hams received wide acclaim. The 
County's Board Of Supervisors and 
Emergency Services Department pre- 
sented Jerry and Bob with plaques* 
The Arizona Star wrote an excellent 
account at the caper and the useful- 
ness of hams' T-hunting activllies. 
"And a local TV station did an Inter- 
view," says Jerry ■'It was from the an- 
gle that if you perpetrate a hoax like 
this, you're going to get into a k»t of 
traubte." 

According to K7KZ, "The agencies 
were upset because the kkts' actrvities 
bad endangered all the residents ol 
the county by tying up all their re- 
sources. They intend to charge them 
with felony endangerment/ KA7CCC 
adds that two State Pattiol helicopters 
in the search had been forced to land 
at some very precarious locations on 
the mountain, risking lives ol the 
crews. IHe says tfiat there may be at- 
tempts to recoup expenses Ol the 
search from the family and that the 
FCC may impose stiff lines. 

N7UGP says that ongoing T-hunt 
experiences made the bust possible. 
"U was just a matter of following the 



Ham help 



Number ^5 on your Feedback card 



1^ are happy to pfovnie Ham Help Hs^gs free on a ^^ce avaif^^ iJdsts. To make ourpb 
easiBF and to ensure thar your tisUng is ame^. pfease type or pffnt yvuf request ciemfy, 
double spaced, on a fuii fS ; 2' x 7i*} sheet of pap^. Use upper- and kmm^<:ase fetters 
wtwfe appfoprialer AJso, prmt numters catetuiiy—A T. for exairipte, can be mtsmad as the 
igOerS t OFt. or even the nomfler 7. SpecsftcaSy mention thai your message is for ttie Ham 
Meip Cofumn. Pfease femeiDt^m^ U> acknowf&^ige responses to yot^ re^jests. 



i recently bought a mllltafy-type VHF 
receiver al a sale. There was no manu- 
al for it. The following information is on 
the name plate: "^VHF Receiver Model 
R950R-3 Serial #1 AF 30(635)905 Ra- 
dio Receptor Co., Brookiyn, NY Gener- 
al Instrument Corp." I believe this sei 
was made in the 1950s. 1 need a man- 
ual and/or schematic lor this rig. Do 
you know where I nrvay t>e able Io ac* 
gurre or>e? I will appreciate any infor- 
mation or advice on ihis. John J. 
Weyraucti. Mirich fld. R.R.4 Box 416, 
Norwich NY 13815-9419. 



WANTED: Schematic diagram « parfs 
list, manual or whatever you may have 
for a MONARCH Modei HAM-2 solid 
state, 4-band commynications receiver, 
I will pay for original or copies. All 
replies answered. Joseph Rubin 
WB4CBJ. P.O. Box 2il'A. CoHex FL 
34215. 

I need the schematic and senflf^ man- 
ual, (or ackJress where t can get these 
items), for BEARCAT BC 250 \ will pay 
for expenses. Jim Samp^tn. PSC Box 
13SB. APO AE 0972Q'99m. 



dopflter right to tiim. On some of our 
hunts, the hider will do tncks like using 
a yagi wtih honzontal polarization and 
aiming at tf« mountair^ to get multiple 
reflections. When you get a real one 
like this, it's usually easy" 

"Our group has been holding hunts 
for two to three years now, more or 
less once a week,'* says Jason. 
"^ We've tracked down a couple of inter- 
ference sources of the ham nature a 
couple of times, and we also have ties 
to people in the CAP who search out 
locator beacons for downed aircraft 
(ELTs) For a whrle. in addtlton to ruiv 
ning hidden transmitters in tiie ham 
bands, we would atso put a dummy 
ELT on the test Irequency {121.6 
MHz) at the hiding site for the CAP 
RDFers. We would call up the local 
FA A to say we were going to be doing 
a drill and get permission. 

"I wish we would have had some 
ready-made organization for events 
like this, perhaps a telephone Iree to 
call people I think a lot ol time and 
money on the part of the Sheriffs de- 
partment could have been saved if we 
had been able to get our act together 
and leave Tucson sooner. The Stieriff 
wants to talk to us at>oul this.*" 

Commendations to all of these Tuc- 
son hams for their eagerness to serve. 
Also, thanks to Nick Ross K06QD for 
bringing this story to my atlenllon. 

Spanning ihe Globe 

Even ItKiugh T-hunters in lf>e USA 



often serve the public like Ihe Arizona 
hams I }ust totd you about and despite 
the fad that some California an- week- 
end hunts require 300 or 400 miles of 
dnving lo find all ifie transmitters, we 
still are not considered world-class 
RDFers by the rest of the world. 

In most countries^ cars and fuel are 
relatively expensive, so they aren't 
likely to be used by the average ham 
tor hobby purposes Mobile fo!< hunting 
can be found only in the USA. Eng- 
land. Australia, and Japan. Every- 
where else, ifs an on-fool sport, done 
for Its physical fitness benefits. East- 
ern European schools include it in 
physical education programs, inciud- 
ing hams and non-hams alike. 

If you go to a former Soviet Union 
country, you probably won't hear voic- 
es on the 2 meter band. You can count 
the Russian cities with VHF repeaters 
on the fingers of one hand. But wher- 
ever you go in tt^at part of the world, 
there is a good chance you can f>ear 
the MCW transmissions ol a 2 meter 
foxhunt. JusI like other amateur ath- 
letes, European and Asian foxtiunSers 
tike to ^t togetfief for national arKt in- 
ternational championships. To this 
end, a standard set ot foxhunt rules 
has been developed by an Intemation- 
al Amateur Radio Union (lARU) com- 
mittee. 

A championship foxhunt course 
comprises five transmitters in a hilly 
wooded area. The foxes are spaced 
such that Ihe round-trip distance to 



Get A New Image 




PC HF Facsimile $99 

PC HF Facsimile Is a simpte, 
j^et oomprehensive ^horl-wave 
fax system for ihe IBM PC and 
eotnpaubies It ir^cludes an 
h SK demodotstor. advanced 
tiQrtaJ procssSing software. 
hUohal audfo cs$s«n$. and 
complete retoronctt marxial 
Just plug itia de<mDdultfDr mbo 
a. j^riai port insi^ii trie 
sailrAwe and getting FAX f$ a 
snap 



PC SSTV S149.95 

PC Slow Scan Television is a 
complete system for sending 
and receiving full colof amatmjr 
SSTV The package indudes 
an SSTV FSK modem. SSTV 
aeHwan, image capti^^ 
uHllli«» and neferwica mv^iak 
All pofxilar formats are 
suppoftod including Robot, 
Scolti*. Martin md AUT Ttw 
lystciin raquires a 2S6. 366i or 
fasler PC with VGA or tuper 
VGA diafHay. 



Have It All For Only $199.95 

For a llmlt&d time WB are offering both softwara packages witTi a single FSK modem 
fw ynder $200. This combinationi offer will let you send and receive all Itie popular 
HF image lransm!$sion modes 

Call or wrtle for our fr«« catal<H»' Vtu and Mastercard walcomecL 



Software Systems Consulting 

615 S. El Camino Real. San Clemente, CA 92672 
Tel. (71 4) 498-5784 Fax. (71 4) 498-0568 



dnCLE 250 ON READER SERVICE CAflO 

73 Amateur Radio Today May. 1995 53 




each or»e in numbered sequence and 
back to the start/f^nisti line is 5 to 12 
kilometers. Each fox transmils for one 
minute, in sequence, on the sam# (r&- 
quency as the others, Sir^ri competi- 
tors take bearings on atl ttve loxes as 
they come on, knowing thai if Ihey 
miss ci lox bearing, they must watt four 
minutes to hear K again, A continuous 
transmitter on a different frequency at 
ttie finish line helps hunlers find their 
way home once Ihey have found al[ 
five foxes and marked their cards with 
the unique punches at each one. 

International rules divide competi- 
tors into separate categories for 
seniors (males 18 to 40 years), juniors 
(boys under 18), women (any age — 
nobody asks!} and "old~lifners." 
Seniors must find all five foxes. 
Hunters in the other three categories 
fiaad Tind only four The non-maiKteiO' 
ry foK JS different for each category, 
gMng different total course tengltis. 

T¥V0 meter foxes use AM with tone 
modulation. There is also a separate 
contest in all four cafegofies on BO 
meters at a different time. This makes 
tor a total of eight indMdual and eight 
team (country) medal sets awarded in 
gold, siJver, and bronze at a champi- 
onship meet. 

The most recent Worid Foxhunting 
Championship was last September in 
Sodertelje, Sweden, about 40 mites 
south of Stockholm. Lars ^fordgre^ 
SM0OY reports that there were en- 
trants from Australia. New Zealand, 
Japan. China, Britain, and South Ko- 
rea, pius nine Scandinavian countries 
and nine ex-Soviei block countries. 
Weather was sunny lor only Itie first 
haH of Ihe 1994 80 meter hunt, then 
rain sel in. It rained throughout the 2 
meter hunt. too. 

Rules state that hunters must re- 
turn to the start/finish Hne within three 
hours or be disqualified. The record 
time of an American foxhunter on a 
course like this is 74 minutes to find all 
five foxes, Teh er men Gouliev, long 
consicSered tfie "faster ol radiosports' 
in Russia, fimshed the 2 meter course 
\n 47 mmyles, 43 seconds, but he 
didn't win. Janos Orosi of Hungary 
beat him by five seconds to become 



the current World Champion Fox- 
hunter. Tchenmen and Janos are tn the 
■old-timers" category and had the 
same placements in the SO meter 
event. Russia, Hungary, Slovakia, 
Ukraine, and the Czech Repubtic 
dominated the meet dividing up the 
individual and team first places in all 
categones, 

European Foxhunt Championships 
(for lARU Region 1) are schteduled for 
September 6-10, 1995. near Bratisla- 
va, Slovakia, Australia will host the 
next lARU Region 3 Championships in 
1996. The next World Championships 
wili be in 1997. country not determined 
yeL 

Where ^s the USA? 

tfs time for RDFers In Nofth and 

South America to gel involved with 
wodd-dass fosfhumirg. Lars and Other 
organizers want to see hams from the 
USA at upcoming championships We 
are going to f>eed lots ol practice and 
competitive experiences. How about 
putting on a rad^osport-type foxhunt at 
your club's next picnic or bariDecue in 
the park? Maybe the next Foxhunting 
World Champion is in your town, just 
waiting to be discovered. 

To my knowledge, only one formal 
international foxhunt has ever been 
held on US soil, tf was put on by the 
Friendship Amateur Radio Society 
(FAR SI of Portland. Oregon, in May 
1991. PARS is the result of a Sister 
Cities arrangement t)etween Poftland 
and Khatiarovsk, a similar-sized aiy in 
Asiatic Russia. 

The hams of Kfiaban^vsk received 
a delegation of Portland amateurs in 
1989 tor a series of radiosporting 
events, including a European/Asian 
style foxhunt. Portland reciprocated by 
putting on the second Friendship Ra- 
diosport Games (FRG) in their city two 
years later (Photo A). See the 
September 1991 "Homing In" column 
and "Showdown in Portland" In the 
November 1991 issue of 73 Amateur 
Radio TiXiay for my firsthand reports 
onFRG'91. 

Victoria. BC, Canada, another 
Kfiabarovsk sister dty, hosted the next 
FARS gathermg in 1993 {Photo B). 



Now the Games were becoming an In- 
ternational event, with fiams from the 
USA. Russia, Japan, and Canada rn 
attendance See the October 1993 
n-lomjng ln~ cotumn for all the details 
of FRG-93. 

This year, ifs the Russians* torn to 
host the Games again, and you're rn- 
VFted, FRG -95 is by no means a World 
ChampFonship, just an opportunity for 
hams across the world 1o gel together 
for camaraderie and radiosports. If 
past Games are any Indication, there 
will be only one foxhunt, on 2 meters. 
It wili not be broken into categories of 
contestants. Expect men, women, 
boys, and giris to compete on equal 
looting. Average age of the Russian 
team last time was 40t and you won't 
be up against any Olympians, 

Ttiis yeaf's Gaff>es are scheduled 
for August n to 13, tnit the FARS ex- 
cyrsk>n to Khabarovsk encompasses 
twp full weeks of sightseeing and cul- 
tural events, beginning August 4. You 
will stay in the homes of Khabarovsk's 
hams, just as they stayed at homes in 
Portland and Victoria. The organizers 
hope to attract competitors from the 
USA. Canada. Japan, fndia, and 
China. 

Aithough it Is an important commer- 
cial hub on the Amur River, 
Khabarovsk is a city of simplicily. Ac* 
cording to Afaska Airtines Magazine, 
The shops are small and simple, Ihe 
streets tilled wth people totir^ bags, 
putting carts. An essential center of 
family activrty is ttie smaii gardens that 
surround each home. Every square 
foot 0* earth wrthm the fences is plant- 
ed with somelhir>g.* 

Khatsarovsk is less ttian 500 miles 
from Sapporo, Japan. The group's 
cost for transportation to and from 
Russia (departing and reluming from 
Seattle) wlli be about $1200 per per- 
son. Other expenses will run about 
$250 per person. Waivers and finan- 
cial aid may be available to those 
deemed by FARS to be official US del- 
egates. 

For hams who love transmitter 
hunting and inleniational travel this is 
an excellent opportunity. If you are 
truly interested in being a pari of 




Photo e. Aiex Savin UAOCDX of 
Khabarovsk took irrdividuaf honors at 
the FRG'93 foxhunt in Victoria. British 
CofomtHa, 



FRG-95, get started on your passport 
preparations and write to Rene 
Berbllnger KX7Z at FAHS/Poriland. 
PO Box 13344, Portland, OR 97213, 
Rene Is assembiing the US deiegation 
and wiil submit your name to get your 
Russian visa Issued. Don't delay — pa- 
perwork must be done weii in advance 
of travel. 

Let me know your ptans also. Re- 
member, my new Internet address is 
simply Horn ingin®aol com. My Com- 
ptiSen/e ID is 75236.2165 If s?oy doni 
have E-maiL write to the address at 
the begin ntng of this column. 




Handheld Repeater Controller 



Spectrum BectnxiK Products 
intfoduce-s ttie wmicfs first 

No laro<&rth3ii most ham^ie4d 
radws. the HRC-10 convefts 
a 5in0e or dual-band fadfo 
ifKo a full Gestured simplex Of 
dupteK mpeatef system. Key 
features of the HROIO m- 



C!tudevotC€ IDer. DTMF Cc*k 
trol and programming, har^ 
and bme-Dut timers, Digrtal 
Voice Operated Squelch 
(DVOS'^) HitefTi^iy Ipnes. 
and pnvMe voice mail &M 
PhonB 40d-438-27afl 
FAX 40ft-43a-6Cl2;7 

S299 




Series Mode 

Powerline surge nrotectlon 

♦ EFFECTfVE- required protection for 
interconneded or networked equipment 

♦ Reliable- non sacrificial design 

♦ Safe- Uses no MOVs 

Awani winning Series Mode technotogi 

eliminates the destructive energy of surge vottage 
si^ge cuireniJ 



Call Of write for fuU detaiis today. Ask about your ham 
op^atDT/ dub discoujtL 

ZereSwielK. 

944 Slate R1 12 Frenchtown NJ 08625 

eoo-o^-eme fax {908) 996-7773 



jMwfif 



SPY O N THE EARTH 

See live on 

your PC 

what 

satellites in 
orbit see 




Capture Sve breathtaking images of IN Earth far fun or 
prafK. Zoom in up lo 20X. Send S39 check or MO, (£45 air, 
$SD overseas) for our fantastic ^2 dishene sel of 
professbnai qualty ccpyrigttfed prggrams ([BM type) tfiat 
does S3l&iie trBcklng, inage acquisrtioa iiBge pft)cessing, 
30 projections arwj more. Direct recepTion fmm the 
satellite gua ranted worldwide without a saielliTe dsh. 
Schemaiics iodubed for nteHace For FREE ir^omiaiion 
log-oni> ourbuleiin board anytimi at: (718) 740-3911. 

VANGUARD Erectronic Labs 

DepL A, 196-23 Jamaica Ave. 

Holiis, NY 1 1 423 TeL71 8-468-2720 



CinCLE 69 ON READER SERVFCE CARD 



CIRCLE 26« ON flEADER SERVICE CARD 



54 73 AmMeur Badio Today • May, 1 995 



MFJ TNCs for VHf/HF Packet 

MhJ-1270Csuper TAPR TNC clone has a world wide reputation as the most reliable packet TNC in 
the world! Tliousands used as digipeaters, nodes, BBS and in all kinds of commericaf applications 
working 24 hours a day - many work for years without a single failure ... 

MFJ 9600 Baud TurboPlus"- THC^ 







MFJ-1270C 



119 



95 



NEW Super TNC-2 

• ROM expands to 5I2K 

• External accessible reset 

• Buili*in monitor amplifier ^ 

• Front panel ON/OFF switch 

• Enhanced DCD circuit for HF ''■^ ~ " 

• Supports I9f200 band terminals 

• Memory Expands to 64K, 128K or S12K 

The MFJ-1270C super TAPR TNC clone has n 
world wide repitiatjon as the most reiiable 
TNC in (he world! 
Thousands are dedicated as digipeaters, nodes, 
BBS and used in all kindi^ uf commercial 
applications working 24 houn a day ^ many woik 
for years without a single failure. 

The Most for Your Money 

The most reliable TNC in the world g\vc& you ibe 
most for your money. See for yoursetf , . . 

Fully TAPR TNC-2 Compatible 

You get full TAPR TNC-2 compatibility — all easy to write efftciem applicaiton programs, 
software and hardware designed for the TAPR MFJ A ftti-Cotlis ion™ Technology 

'^^5Mc!?£l^'i.^.'^''u^Kmi''''* 7"^'^^c'l^l«"^'*'«i; Vou get MFJ's Anti-Cotlision™ technology that 

get NETROM theNET and Rose Switch prevents packet comsionsiindimpix>vesperfonniice on 
compaiihjhty ihat turns your MFJ-1270C into a busy channels 

Plus more . . . 



MFJ- 1 27'K:0 








■rr 




M #M Kb > 


rta 


k* Mil. mi 

H 1 






jffTl^ 


■1 


v 




; 4 


* « 


« 


* 


t 



Has cilJ Lht; features ofthe MFJ- I27(X:, the most 
reluMe TNC in the world, plus biiih^n 9600 baud 
G3RUH conipmible modem. Operate 3fK), 1200 
Bpd 9600 baud. 



WeFAX gives you Weather Mafis 
You get a WeFAX mode that lets you prim full 
fledged weather maps fnwn your HF radio to screen or 
printer or save to disk using an MFJ Starter PacL 

Phig-in Modem - - 2400 or 9600 Baud 

You can add MFJ's optional mtemai 2400 baud 
or 9600 baud modem just by plugging it in and 
making a few simpk connections. 

KISS interface and MFJ Host Mode 

You get a KISS interface that lets you mn TCP/IP 
and MYSYS and MFJ^s Host Mode that makes it 



paiiDJiity mat turns you 
Layer ITiree and Four networking node* 

VHF and HF uperatian. 

Yoo get high performance VHF and HF modems 
as standard equipment — for double fun. 

You gel a true DCD circuit that dramatically 
reduces sensitivity to noise and dramatically 
increases completed QSOs. 

FREE AC Power Supply 

You eel a free 1 10 VAC power suppy at no extra __ ^ . , 

cost. With other brands, the AC power supply could year mtconditiona! guarantee. 

cost you an extm $20.9^ Epjoy Packet for a long, long time 

New enhanced Persona] Mailbox If you want a TNC that II work 24 hours a day 

The entianced Easy Mail'^* personal mailbox lets without failure - one that has more features tlian any 

you use a dedicated call-sign for your mailbox. Yovr other - get the ultra reliable MFJ'1270C today and 

maUbox can slay on while you operate packet It will enjoy packet for a long, long time* 
also auto forward or reverse forward mail to and from 2400 Baud Turbo™ TNC 

other BBSs. A check mail LED blinks when you have ,«:,n, i^^ni-*^ i->f^wic u it -u i- ^ ^.l 

m«i,. Mo. fe....s: .e.ote .ysop .c.s. sy4 ^^^ mF^7?cS SS" fS f40^turrit 



You also get 32 K RAM, IC sockets for easy 
service* 25 6K ROM* speaker jack, lithium battery 
backup, RS-232 and TTL serial ports, radio cable 
(you have to add a connector for your radio)* 
Fast-Start™ Manual plus much moie. Use 12 VDC or 
1 10 VAC. 9V2X1 Vix7Vi in. 

One Year Unconditional Guarantee 
You get MFJ*s famous No Matter Whaf* one 



mailbox C-lexl, chat mode and many other features not 
available in other TNCs. The mailbox memory is 
expandable to 32K, 12SK and 5 1 2K. 



MFJ's new TNC/Mic Switah 

Switch between your TNC or Mic by pushing a button! 

Switch between your MFM272B/M 
microphone and TNC by $9^S5 
pushing a button f d'ft ^^vaiHhiM^aH^H ^■ 

You won't have to unplug your ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

microphone and plug in your TNC 
every time you want to work packet 
or other digital modes. 

Just plug these |5re-wired 
cables into your rig's microphone connector and into your TNC and 



Operate 300, 1200 and 2400 baud packet with the 
MF3-1270CT RaJio mtxlification is not necessary when 
operating 24O0 baud packet 



TNC ACCESSORliS 

MFJ Starter Pocks 

An MFJ Staner Pack, S 24.95 , gets you on the air 
instantly. Vou gel interface cable, software on disk 
and ini>tructions —Just plue it all in and start enjoying 
packet Order MFJ-1284'^for IBM or compatibles, 
MFJ-1282 for Commodore 64/128, MFJ-1287 for 
Macintosh or MFJ-1290 for Amiga. For V1C-20 or 
C64/128 with tape drive use MFJ- 1283. $24.95. 

3400 ond 9600 Baud Modems 

MFJ-2400, S89.95, operates 300, 1200 and 2400 
baud packet and works with any radio. MFJ-96flO, 
$109,95, G3RUH compatible 9600 baud modeni Not 
all radios compatible with 9600 baud* Both plug into 
MFJ TNCs for easy installation. 

Maf fflw^jT Meitioty 

For MFJ-1270ai276. Plugs into RAM socket for 
extra mailbox memory. MFJ-45A <32K), $14.95, 
MFJ45B(128K). $34.95, MFJOSC (512K), S219.95. 

Real TSnte Clock 

MFJ-43, S29,95. ends re-seriing TNC c Jock 
ever> Lime you turn it on. Maintains correct time even 
when TNC is off. Plugs into RAM socket Works 
with MFJ TNCs and TAPR TNC clones. 

FM Devkrtioii Meter 

MFJ-52. S29 95, plug this board into your TNC 

configured as ThcNet X-1 J Node wd users am dieck their 
tninicei^-er packet FM deviation, Reqmies X-1 J or later 
nodcwaie. See CQ Ma^iizine, Nov 1993 . 

Ftrntwiire Upgrade 1.2.9 

For older MFJ TNCs. MFJ-4aC. $19.95, gives you 
enhanced mailbox and supports mailbox up to 512IC 

Moilbox Memory Expantton Board 

For older MFJ TNCs. MFJ -47 A. $49.95. 32K 
RAM; MFJ-4?B, $69.95. 128K RAM; MFJ-47C. 
$239.95» 5 12K RAM- Complete with finnware. 



I 




you're ready to go — no more hard-to-find connectors aod wiring up cables. 

Works with HF, VHF ai>d UHF radios with 8 pin itiic connectors - jncluding 

Kenwood, ICOM, Yaesu, Alinco and others. For radios with Spin RJ'45 modular 

telephone jack, select the ne^' "M" models. 

rlug~io jumpers let vou quickly set-up for virtually, any radio. Factory set for 

Kenwood and Alinco. Includes easy-to-follow instnictions. Has audio-in and 

speaker jacks. 3 V4X 1 '/*x4 inches. 

MFJ-1272B/1272M, $34.95, for MFJ TNC/muUimodes,TAPR TNC-2 clones, 

MFJ-1272BX/1272MX, $39.95, for PK-232. 

MFJ-1272BYV/1272MYV, $39,95, for KAM VHF/KPC3, 

MFJ-1272BYH/1272MVH, $39.95, ft)r KAM HF Port. 



PK-^wireif Radio-to-TNC cables * . . *14*^ 

AUMI-J PK-23r' VK-W" *KA\VVKt'C3 

'icam/Yaesu HTs MFJ-5024 MFJ-5024X MFJ'5024Z MFJ-5024YV 



■Kenwuod I ITs 



Yaesu 

8 pin radios 



MFJ-5Q26 MFJ-5D26X 



MFJ-5026Z ME J-5026YV 



MFJ'5080 MFI'508OX MFJ^50B0Z 



MFJ-50S0YV 

MHJ-5a80YH 



PACICEr/7/»$ FACTOR TNC 

rou get all the features ofthe MFJ-1270C HF/VHF TNC plus . , . FACTOR 
, , . precision HF tuning indicator. . , extra 32 K mailbox memory . . . 
PA C TOR MFJ- 1 276 



'te 



mdios 



MFJ-50S4 MFJ-50S4X MFJ-50S4Z lijpj:|^?H 



&cNn radiG 



Alinca 

OS 



MFJ 508& MFJ-5086X MFJ-50S62 



MFJ-5086YV 
MFJ-5086YH 



; doei not inciudc IC-W2A 2 ihtl JKW ttKimk 2S0Q J dotf m>i iniiniif 2M * 255A 
4 rV mtfdeij oNutecj VHFfma KAM KPCJ. W mcdldi coimtci HF pert of KAM 

Cobles wth connectof prm^wir^i^w jrovr radio 

MFJ -5082. $9.95, open end cable w ith 8- pin mic connector 
MFJ'5224. $9.95, open end cable for Icom/Yacsu handhelds 
MFJ-5226, $9.95, open end cable for Kenwood handholds ^ 

MFJ-5268, $7.95, open end cable with 8-pin modular phone plug 
for Yaesu FT-2400H, Kenwood TM641A. TM7 14A, TM732A 




combine!^ the $4 CQ95 

best of Packet *^^ 

and AMTOR for HP, You get • 

excellent weak signal 

operation, error correction, 

faster baud rate, data compression and full 8-bil word transmissions. 

A 20 LED bargraph makes HF tuning easy. Just tune your radio to center a single 




FREE MFJ Catalog 

Write or call . . . 800-647- 1890 ■* 



(J 




CIRCLE B6 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



LED and you're Drecisely tuned 
in to within id Hz *- and it 
shows you which way to tune! 

You also get an extra 32 K 
of memory for your enhanced 
Easy Mair* packet mailbox. 

MFJ-1276T.$249.9S, 
same as MFJ- 1276 but includes 
fast 2400 baud modem. Lets 
you operate 300, 1200, and 
2400 baud packet. 



Near^t Dealer/Orders: 800-647-1800 
Technical Help: 800-647-TECH(8324) 

• t year uiasndfere/ guamntee • 30 day rnoney back 
guaiarlee (less a^) ort ofdefs fTDcn MFJ * FREE catalog 

MFJ ENTf^RPRLSES, INC 

jBox 494, ^fe. Stale, MS 39762 
(601) 323-5869; 84::^() CiiT Mon.- Ri 
FAX: (601) 323-655 1 ; Add srti 

MFJ . . • fftaking quality affordable 

Prices and specif Icaitons subject lo change 1994 MFJ EtUirprijes, lac. 




Hams ATS 



NumbCf IS on your Feedback card 



Amateur Radio Via Satellites 



Andy MacAmter WASZiB 
147t4 Knight Way Dnve 
Houston TX 770SS 

Mexico, Israel and Russia 

Two new hamsats were scheduled 
for faunch on March 28th UNAMSAT-1 
fronn yexico and TECHSAT-1 from Is- 
rael may now be in orbit. Launch was to 
be from the Plesetsk (acilily in Russia- 
Both satellrres are of (tie digital variety, 
bui offer some unique lealure^ that set 
tnem apart from the current digital fleet. 

UtiAMSAT-1 

8uill at ttie Universidad Nac^onal 
Aulonoma 6e MexKO, by the PUIOE (Ptd- 
grama UniversHario de tnvestigacton y 
Oesarrollo Espacial) group, UNAMSAT-1 
is a microsat done witti a fascinating ex- 
periment in the TSFR slot. Tfie first mi- 
crosats were launctied from Frencfi 
Guiana five years ago. They are smalf 
cubes. 25 cm on a side, weighing about 
10 kg each, with ftve stacked modules. 
Four of the modules contain standard 
components common lo all irtciuding a 2 
meter receiver, battefy charge regulator, 
computer and a 70 cm transmitter. T^^e 
lifth module or slot has been called the 
T^R or The Space ftK Reni' 

TM UhJAMSAT-l TSFR consists of a 
100'Walt radar transmitter on 40.997 
MHz. it sencts shon putses and tfien Its- 
tens for echos from iontialion trails 
caused by meteors as they bum up in 
the atmosphere. The returning echos 
are digitized by the onboard computer 
and dowr>(jnked as data tiles on 70 cm 
for study. The 41 MHz transmitter is li- 
censed by Mexico according to the ITU 
(International Telecommunications 
Union) frequency allocation listings. 

The goal of the ex penmen I is !o iden- 
tify meteors that tiave velocities greater 
than 72 km/sec. This is the sotar system 
escape velocity. Meieors iraveling faster 
are from outside our system. To identify 
these meteors, detailed spectrum analy- 
sis IS pefformed on ihe downlinked da- 
ta. Velocities and trajectories can then 
be determined. 

The radar transmitter consists of a 
crystal-controlled exciter running 220 
mW and a high eltjciency {9^/o) power 
amplifier. Modifications were made to 
the standard satellite power supply to 
provide the current necessary for the 
puts© transmitter. A switching power 
suppfy charges a bani< of lanlalum ca- 



pacitors to 40 volts DC. The satellite's 
power supply usually only provides 1 
volts. The transmitter's power amplifier 
operates from the charged capacitor 
bank for the duration of a radar pulse. 
The bank Is then recharged bslween 
pulses without straining the 10- vol! sup- 
ply line. 

The radar receiver has a GaAsFET 
(G alii urn- Arsenide Field Effect Transis- 
tor) front end to a double balanced mix- 
er bandpass filter. IF (Intermediate Fre- 
quency) amplifier phasing network and 
stimming ampSilsef. The mixer samples 
the crystal oscillator to obtain inie 
Doppler shift mformatior> on incoming 
signals. The output of the receiver is 
sent to a 68HC805B6 microprocessor 
for analog-to-digftal conversion. The re- 
sutts are ttien sent to tf>e satellite's main 
CPU (Central Processing Unit) for en- 
coding and subsequent transmission to 
the ground. 

Both the receiver and transmitter 
share the same antenna, a canted 
dipole, through a hybrid circuit that pro- 
vides sufficient signal isolation. The an- 
tenna supports on the microsat were 
braced to support ihe larger elements 
needed for 41 MHz. 

The TSFR of UNAMSAT-l repre- 
sents a significant aoMrriplishnienl. The 
radar system with conlrgller were alt 
packed into one module, and it works. 
Ground tests in the fall ol t994 per- 
formed bener than expected. Meieor re- 
flections were detected, digitized, stored 
and sent as files by the satelifte. Pro- 
grams will be available after launch to 
aid interested amateur enthusiasts with 
decoding endeavors, 

UNAI^SAT-1 also has the usual 
store-and-forward capabiiities of the 
other microsats. Operation Is at 1200 
bps (bits per second) using FSK (Ire- 
quency-shift keying) on any of the up<ink 
frequencies: 145.831. 145. B51 or 
145.371 MHz. The downlinks are also 
12O0 bps but use PSK (phase-shrft key- 
ing) on 437-206 or 437 064 MHz. 

The eight students from UN AM in* 
votved with satellite oonstruction. and 
program manager David Liberman 
XEITUt traveled to Russia m early 
March lo prepare for iaunch. The Ple- 
setsk launch site is about 700 km north 
of Moscow. 

TECttSAT-1 

Built at the Technion in Haifa, Israel. 



TECHSAT-1 is Israel's first amateur ra- 
6iQ satellile. The spaceframe shape is 
similar to a microsat. but has nearly 
eigfit times the volume and weighs in at 
50 kg. five limes that of UNAMSAT4. 
TECHSAT-1, also known as Guerwrn-t. 
has backing from academic arnj con^ 
mercial interests in addition to the active 
participatkDn of AMSAT-tsraeL 

The satellite has a three-axis stabi- 
lization system using computer-con- 
trolled electromagnets. Early tests at the 
Technion proved the magnetorqueing 
system to be quite effective. Complete 
stabilization of the spaceframe was 
achieved within three hours. In orbit the 
satellite will be pointed earthward al all 
limes. A horizon sensor will aid the 
magnetoniueing oonlroi process. 

One reason for Ihe orienlation sys- 
tem is to keep the onboard camera 
aimed property. Like prevkjus UoSATs 
and KItsats. TECHSAT-1 wilt Cake snap^ 
Shots oi the earth lor downtoading to 
stations on ttie ground, A new algorithm 
for image compression will be used. 
Current files from the ottier imaging 
hamsats run about 300 KB each. 
TECI-lSAT-1 will precompress the data 
to make smaller files for transmission to 
earth. 

The radio communications compo- 
nents of TECHSAT-1 are digital. It will 
njn 1200 bps PSK like ottier microsais, 
but will also be capable of 9600 bps 
FSK like UoSAT-OXAR-22, Krtsat-OS- 
CAR-23 and -25. Store- and- forward, 
multi-user operation will be the primary 
amateur radk> adrvity. Of ttie 20 wans 
avaiiable to tfie payk>ad, 10 will be re- 
quired for houselceeping circuilry. 

In addition to the usual 2 meter up^ 
links and 70 cm downlinks. TECHSAT-1 
will also carry a 23 cm receive system. 
The four 2 meter uplinks are 1 45.850, 
145.890, 145.910 and 145.930 IWHZ. 
The 23 cm uplinks include 1269.700, 
1269.800, 1269.900 and 1269.950 
MHz, The two downlink frequencies are 
435,225 and 435.325 MHz. For those 
who have dusty 1.2 Ghtz satellite ngs 
(since the foss ot Mode L on AMSAT- 
OSCAR-13). there may soon be a great 
reason to get back In the microwave 
transmission business. 

Th€ Orbit 

The launcher for both satetlrtes is to 
be a Russian START fockel. The pro- 
posed orbit is €70 km in altitude and not 
sun synchronized. The inclination is es- 
timated at 75.4 degrees with very little 
eccentricity. Coverage will be similar to 
Uo3AT-QSCAR-11, TECHSAT-1 and 
UNAIVISAT-1 will have orbits about 100 
km Eower than U-0-22. For ground sla- 



tions. this means lour to six passes a 
day. 9-13 minutes in duration. For ana- 
log transpondier satellites this is km and 
reminiscent ol Shuttle chasing, but for 
digital satellites it's enough time to cof- 
tect up to 4O0 KB of ^ta at 9G00 bps on 
every pass. 

Waiting 

Unlike RS-15, which was available 
for amateur use within hours after 
launch, the new additions to the hamsal 
group will not be released until ground 
control stations have fully tested the on- 
board systems 

Testing UNAMSAT-1 may take a few 
weeks. After launch. Ihe team from 
Mexico is scheduled to travel back to 
Moscow. There they are to do initial 
spacecraft checkout from the Moscow 
Aviation institute. Later, they wilt return 
to Mexkio City lo comptete ttie process. 
The radar experiment will be of prime 
interest to the satellite builders, it is a 
first for amateur radk> satellites and has 
great potential 

Early reports from Israel indicated 
that the ham radio operation oi 
TECHSAT-t would be delayed for up to 
six months alter launch. Recent infor- 
mation from Haifa now states that the 
delay may be three months or less. 
Testing of all the experiments may take 
some lime. Frequencies outside the am- 
ateur bands will be used for these t^ts. 
When the saielfile is finally released for 
amateur use. a certain portion of its time 
will tie spent in commercial and aca- 
iJemic service. A schedule is expected. 

Both |}^ Israeli and Mexican learns 
are interested in reports from hams 
monitoring the leiemeiry in the early 
days of the riew hamsats. M no delays 
occur, l^ey should be in orbit now. 
Telemetry reports for Uf^AMSAT-1 can 
be sent to XElTU@amsat.org via the 
Internet. Techsat-1 reports go to 
4 X6E M @lx . techn lo n . ac. 1 1 . 

More Information 

Late-breaking hamsat news can al- 
ways be found on the HF AMSAT nets, 
via packet an6 on the interneL Another 
source is the Houston Area AMSAT 1^. 
This net meets every Tuesday night at 
10 p.m. Central Time on the 147.10 
MHz WD5BDX repeater, ft is also up- 
linked to Telslar 302. transponder 21, 
5.B MHz audio subcamer. From there 
the net is retransmitted on VHF and 
UHF repeaters around North America. It 
can also be heard on 1 60 maters AM on 
1B60 kHz. Check- ins from remote (non- 
Houston) locations are by phone and 
everyone has a great time. See you on 
the net. 



PAY TV A(4D SATELLITE DESCRAMBLING 



All Htivj Info 



VOLUMES 



All Mew info 




MUdioiiciillcwr TWftJ 
•PftyTV Volumes 1-5 Saieltrte ^kI D@S Handbook 

- Wirefess Cable hte^^uoQ • Hadcef VhS&O 

■ Compieie Wftzard {VC»+) • Ciidar Phone Habwg 

fl£ » men Of 3«3« «|« i«£S:B£ 
Q«;9&iSie«j» CiWotfl'i ia DiirMciriiA.«S(^iAidHiPUlit 




FtELD DA YANTBNNA 



SCRAMBLING NEWS 

3^94 £>ela\vare Ave Btinnlo, NV 14217-1230 
Voice/FAX 716.874 20S8 BBS 716 B71.1915 



CIRCLE 3B ON READER SERVICE CARD 



!i^ 



TNT b No-txDiefm IQ cw, 4CL 30, 17, jZiO- TNT/2 i* NiMunr on «, 
3D, ia WHk other twMfow/ bmr. VOf, A:G«i rise w/ fmfuctK^ 



lnd«idaiR4il»n 

Antetinas VJest 






iHnUlrJbnjgOOV 



TNTT/Z 

Window 






Oiilef 



SS9r 

l^?'^i long 

a? p.. Jm^ 



PftH 



^Bo«5006ZS,rrovatJrft46tB ^j)gf; 801-373'^25 

CIRCLE 135 ON HEADER SEAVlCE CARD 



2 Meter Portable 

Arrow ratuiii) Antenna 

Hus 19 the Qn« you have heard about 
Oian^E &01D a walkme ^ttck Xq a 
4 Fkmmt beans m Its* me 2 ttusutei 
Strtmg & Upht Wei^ • rro oo 
SmpNtheBfsS fO^ 

AjTTow Antenna ^^"^" 

1461 Peacock PL ^"'^ ( 303 ) 663^5485 

Lowland, CO 80537 p«, (303)663-5065 

CIRCLE 80 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



I 



56 73 AmatGur RBdIo Todsy • May, 1 995 



HOW rr ALL STARTED 

We wanted to offer rfie most affordable 
HF rig in the industry and still provide 
real performance for even the most expe- 
rienced ham. In recent years, mony hams 
requested a "back to basics" tronsceiver 
thcit v^os simple to use. We reviewed all 
the lafest design techniques, selected the 
best concepts from me 20 rigs we 
designed over these 25 years and asked 
300 hams across the country for their 
ideas. 

WE CAa rr the scout 

Every feature con be 
mastered in minutes. No 
modern rig ts as easy to 
use. It only takes a second 
lo change bonds. Piug-in 
modules are available for 
160-10 meters including 
WARC, Single con- 
version and crystal 
mixing are the 
foundation of this 90 
dB dynamic range 
receiver. That's the strong signal 
performance or rigs costing 3 times Os 
much! Ifs sensitive and receive audio is 
sparkling clean with less than 2% distor- 
tion. The ideal selectivify for every band 
condition is at the touch of a knob. This 
potented "Jones" filter provides variable 
k bandwidrti from 500 Hz to 2,5 KHz. 

HERE'S HOW IT'S USED 

MOBILE 

Hams complain about today's cars 
having precious little space for gear. The 
SCOUT is the smallest HF rig in the 
industry (excluding QRPl measuring only 
2.5" X 7.25" X 9.75" and runs directly 



off the 1 2 VDC car hoffery. iF the SCOUT 
won't fit your car, nothing will The 
optional noise blanker reduces ignition 
noise from both your car and the one 
that just drove by. 

PORTABLE 

Business travelers and vacationing hams 
typically set up a briefcase or smoll 




travel bag to include the 5 lb SCOUT, 
wire or whip antenna and lightweight 
power supply like our Model 938 
switcher (its only 3 lbs!). It is surprising 
how many hikers and cyclists take along 
their SCOUT using some clever battery 
arrangement, 

NEW HAMS 

The SCOUT is the most economicol way 
to get started in ham radio. Consider the 
choice a new ham must moke just to test 
his interest in HF: (1) Spend nearly 
$1000 or more on a new rig, (2) buy a 
used rodio and take a chance on its 



"SYNCHRO-LOCr software keeps 
VFO virtually drift free regardless 
of temperoture variation. 

SSB and CW 50 Watts Output 
Adjustable To 5 Walts 

RunsOff 12'UVDC,TX-10 
Amps, RX -.6 Amps 

Receive Offset Tuning 

Built-in Iambic Keyer with 
Legendary QSK. Speed adjustable 
on front and shown in display. 



$549' 



includes one bond 
module of your choice 



$29* Each odditionol band module 
SCOUT ACCESSORIES: 

MODEL 



PRICE* 



296 


Mobile Bracket 


$15 00 


297 


Noise 9 onker 


Si 9.50 


937 


1 1 Amp Power Supply 


S79.00 


938 


Tiny Swih:(iing Supply 
(Only 3 lbs.!] 


S95.00 


700C 


Hand Mike 


S39.95 


607 


Weighed Key Paddle 


$39.00 


291 


Antenno Tuner 


;i89 00 



condition, or (3) invesf in a SCOUT at 
$549 with a one year factory warranty 
and our legendary TEN-TEC support. 

OLD TIMERS 

Operators with years of experience and a 
shack full of expensive HF gear also buy 
the SCOLFT It's refreshing to many who 
soy '"If takes 5 minutes to learn and 
without all the complicated features, there 
is only one thing to do with a 
SCOUT, work someone!" 
Experienced hams call us 
constantly to report "1 
can't believe this 
receiver, it outperforms 
my SI 400 synthesized 
rig*. 

CALL TODAY: 
1-800-833-7373 

(U.S. & Canada) 

Call Ten-Tec from 9:00 AM to 
5:30 PM Eostern time, Monday 
through Friday for more information or to 
order* You con reach our repair depart- 
ment of 615-428-0364 from 8:00 AM to 
4:00 PM. You con also FAX at 61 5-428- 
4483 or write us at 1 1 85 Dolly Parton 
Parkway, Sevierville, TN 37862- 

ATTENTION QRP ENTHUSIASTS 

The SCOUT has a little brother, the ARGO 
556. It is identical to the SCOUT without 
the 50 watt hnal. adjustable 1-5 watts 
output. TX-2 Amps, R)(-.6 Amps. 

Only $489* 




VISA. MC, DISCOVER 

*l'lus shipping ond horrdiing; coW toll' free for charges. 



TEN-TEC 

© l994Ten-fe:Jrtc. 

MADE IN 
USA 



Introducing TKits 

A ne^ division of Ten-Tec 

Call 615-453-7172 

to request your 

kit catalog 



Number 17 on your F&edback card 



Hj^ NumDer 1 / on your h&eaoacK ca 

Packet & computers 



Jeffrey Sfoman NfEWO 
C/0 73 Magazine 
70 Route 202 Noflh 
Petedyorough NH 0345B 

Well, here I am again. Thanks to 
all who wondered where I went, J am 
glad to know I was missed. Life here 
has been chaotic for the past few 
months, it included the birth ot son 
number two, Dov Zaiman, who 
spent a week in the hospital at 10 
days otd. Not to worry, he is a 
fal healthy baby today. A touch of 
pn^ymonla and aboul Si 2.000 in 
medical care later he is back to nor- 
mal. Many other things have been 
goir>g on here — some of them even 
ham -radio related^ 

JndyGate 

Soon, Indianapolis (my home 
town) will have its first AMPRnet (the 
amateur radio portion ot the Internet) 
gateway. This machine will link hams 
with ordinary 2m packet stations to 
Ihe world via the Internet. Those that 
Install and learn to use TCP/IP soft- 
ware — such as Ihe JNOS version of 
Phil Karn's KA9Q NOS, which will 
prnter the gateway— will gel an even 
more powerful connection. By the 



packet and frame have distinct mean- 
ings Suffice it to say that people 
usually mean frame when they say 
packet. 

Frame headers contain different 
information, depending upon the pro- 
tocol ihey adhere to. But, in any case, 
where the protocol is designed to al- 
low more than two "nodes" (amateur 
stations in our case) to communk:ate. 
the header must contain "addressing 
information. This leads us 1o a conve- 
nient analogy— a ietler. Think of ihe 
frame as an envelope. You are all fa- 
miliar wilfi the 'protocoT for address- 
irvg a letter. On the frame (envelope) 
you include addressing information. 
The ffestmation address (in ihe cen- 
ter of the envelope- — and nowhere 
else if you want that letter delivered), 
and the origination address (return 
address In Ihe corner). This Informa- 
tion is placed In particular spots, and 
the Post Office looks there to find 
where to send the letter, while Ihe re- 
cipient looks at the return address to 
reply. 

In the data frame case, the header 
is laid OU1 m a particLilar order: the 
first X byies are destination, the sec- 
orMJ X bytes are sender, etc. The ma- 
chine looks at ihQ header arid tig u res 



"'Even for most of those who 

use the Internet with ham radio, 

just what a gateway does is 

a mystery. 



time yoii read this, IndyGate should 
be on the air. Next month, I wHi tell 
you exactly how you can get invotved 
in TCP/IP over amaieur radio— and. 
finally, how you can definitely get the 
JNOS software arKJ documentation. 

What is a Gateway? 

Evdn for most ol those who use 
the Infemret with ham radio, fust what 
a gateway does Is a mystery To have 
some understanding of what a gale- 
way does, youli need to have a men- 
tal picture of how TCP/IP works, 
TCP/IP, which stands fpr Transmis- 
sion Control Protocol/fnternet Proto- 
col is a '"suite" of rules and programs 
that let computers exchange data on 
the Internet For the sake of our dis- 
cussion here, we only need to consid- 
er the stnjcture of an IP "frame* 

A frame in networking is a pack- 
age ol data, which has a "header*^ 
the first part of the frames-containing 
data needed to handle the frame. 
Sometimes, frames are referred to as 
"packets," This is not technically cor- 
rect . but it is common usage. Packet 
radio gets its name because of its 
use of packets — AX 25 is a "packet 
switched" protocol — but even there 



out where the frame should go, The 
letter Inside the envelope is the data 
you want to send, and the IP frame 
has a lietd" (a specified portion ot the 
frame) to handle this as welL 

Now with this picture — more or 
less — firmly fixed In your mind, think 
about this: What if you were at raid 
that people seeing your letter's enve- 
lope could tell who you wefe sending 
mail to? I know this sounds a little 
paranoid, but let's put ii in ham radio 
tenris. What it there were somewhere 
you could send a letter, so that when 
your letter arrived it was immediately 
opened and read on the (ham radio) 
air? What if the receiving station 
made no distinction about where the 
letter came from, Instead )ust as- 
sumed that If il anwed at that address 
11 must be OK to read on some ama- 
leur frequency? 

Well, now yoii can see that you 
might want the arfdress ol this mylhi- 
cal location secret^io prevent unli- 
censed individuals from operating 
amateur transmitters. Well, you say, 
why can1 (hey just check if the letter 
m from a ham? Good question— «but it 
would take too long. Too many hams, 
not enough time. So what can we do 



to make this arrangement safe from 
non-Hcensed individuals wtio might 
want to access it? One thing is to 
hide itie address o( the station that 
broadcasts feceive<l messages. Just 
how can we manage to address an 
envelope m such a way that tl w^ll get 
where we want, but not let anyone 
reading it know where that is? 

Encapsulatfon 

One of the features of the AMPR- 
net that Keeps it safe from non-ham 
access Is called encapsulation. This 
technique is really very simple, and 



ft you understood that, you un- 
derstand encapsulation and why 
we need gateways. Traffic on the 
tnternet is visible to many people 
for various reasons You cannot be 
sure who will see where your data 
is going. If the actual address of a 
radio-connected amateur resource 
became known, it might lead to 
the use of a transmitter by an unau- 
thorized person. So we use I PIP 
encapsulation: thai is, we wrap an IP 
frame destined to a ham address 
in an IP frame headed tor a ''norma r 
Internet address, The machine at 



'The point is, when amateur 
traffic moves on the Internet proper, 
it is hidden inside 'normal' 
Internet traffic. 



jf 



can be explained by continuing our 
Post OH ice analogy, Whai we do is 
get a ham to agree to receive mail for 
the transmitting station. When the 
mail is received there, he can check il 
against a much smaller list ot hams 
authorized to mail letters to him. In 
other words, he Is able to authenti- 
cate the fact that the sender is a ham, 
because the ham has registered him- 
self prior to the mail being sent No! 
ail hams, mind you, just the ones he 
is willing to handle traffic for. Ha is 
our "gateway" to the transmitting ad- 
dress. Now. he ts not responsible tor 
deErvery to just one address that can 
handle tiam traffic, but for many sites 
all over the world How can he tell 
where your traffic should go? 

Opening the Envelope 

When the mail arrives at the gate- 
way addresSp the other envelope 
(frame) is opened and discarded. 
f^ake a guess about what is inside 
before you read on. Ef your guess is 
another envelope, you are right' Thjs 
envelope, though, is addressed to our 
trar^mitting station and is hand-deliv- 
ered by hams sworn to secrecy atXJut 
the real location (address) of our 
transmitter When the envelope 
(frame) arrives at the transmitter site. 
Ft IS opened and processed. 



the "normar address delects that 
the frame Is encapsulated, and 
extracts the amateur frame from in- 
side. It then sends the frame on the 
"private" amateur networi^ by deliver- 
ing directly to the appropriate ad- 
dress. The point Is, when amateur 
traffic moves on the Internet proper, 
it is hidden inside "normai" Internet 
traffic. This is, of course, not the only 
security on the AlV^PRnet, It would not 
be sufficient. 

The Great Internet Survey 

The time has come to make a 
survey of Internet use by readers of 
this column. I have two goals m 
mind. One is to see how many of you 
are using the Interrtet, and how. The 
other is to compile a list of ISPs 
(Internet Service Providers) from 
across the country so I can answer 
the many queries I get concerning 
getting connected. The questions 
are in the sidebar on this page. 
E-mail the survey Information to 
N1EWO@lQUESTNET Make the 
subject of your message: 73 Inteniet 
Sun^ey. You do not need to reproduce 
the questions, just put the number in 
front of your answer. 

Thanks for taking the time to 
compleie the survey. I hope to hear 
from you soon. 73 de N 1 EWO 



internet Survey 

1 . What fs your call? 

2. Do you run TCP/IP on your packet station? 

3. If yes to 2, v^^hich software/version? 

4. What is your AMPRnet address? (or "none",) 

5. What is your name? 

6- What Is your Internet mail address? 

7. Who is your Internet provider? 

8. What is the monthly cx>st for a SLIP connection? (or *don:t krrow",) 

9. On a scale from 1 to 10, how woukJ you rate the service you have 
received? 

10. Would you recommend youf provider to a friend? 

It. What is the provider s service area? 

12, What is ttie InlernBt providers E-mail address for information? 

Please E-mail your answers to fsJtEWO@IQUESTNEX 



58 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



Anyone (including you) can learn the 

Morse Code in one hour! 

Forget the No-Code License and 

get your Tech-Plus Ticket. 

Guarantee: You'll pass the 5 wpm code 

test with Uncle Wayne's system or 

YOU GET A 100% REFUND! 



The truth is that no one us»ing tlii<; new system 
hm ever failed the 5 wpm code tcsL And it h high- 
ly unlikely that anyone ever will. We're talking 
about such a total Do-brainer approach that many 
people are able to spend ]tss. than ] 5 minutes using 
this speed system before being able to ace the 
Novice-Technieian code lest 

Help your children, your wife and your friends 
get their ham licenses with ihis ultra- fast code sys- 
tem. Cei your kids to help their friends to gel their 
Uceases. If we're going to try and keep our ham 
bands we need tens of thousands more hams. Mil- 
lions will be even better. 

Help start kids on their way toward high-tech 
careers by getting them hooked on hamming. The 
biggest obstacle to a ham license in the past has 
been the code. Now, with this new miracle system, 
this is just not even a minor problem. No longer 
will there be the slightest stress when taking that 
stupid code test that the ARRL Board of Directors 
has forced the FCC to continue to use as the pri- 
mary method for keeping newcomers away from 
the hobby. 

With the success of America in ibe next centu- 
ry dependent on our ability to provide high-tech 
career workers to deal with the infoimation high- 



way and the computerization of the workplace, 
amateur radio provides a fun way to ger kids inter- 
ested in leaning about technology. It beats the beck 
out of Nintendo and Sega, which leach nothing. It 
even beats sports, which provide a good living for 
a handful of stars and disappointment and pover^ 
ty for the losers. 

We need to see radio clubs sprouting in our sec- 
ondar>' and high schools again. We need to see 
hamming become a major activity in retirement 
homes and villages. We have room for millions of 
hams on our bands... of which we're using less 
than O^"^ today on any regular basis. Yep, that's 
right, 99.8% of our ham bands are just sitting there 
almost totally unused, with us wailing around for 
the FCC to sell them off and pocket the money 
without even a word of thanks. 

How much arc we charging for Uncle Wayne's 
One Hour Guaranteed Miracle Code Course? S5.00 
postpaid. That's right, it's only live bucks! Since 
our charge card minimum is S7.50» maybe you 
should order some of Uncle Wayne*s otciiing 
adventure stories as adveitiscd by Llncle Wayne's 
Bookshelf. Or send S5-00 cash or check. This will 
be one of the better five bucks you* 11 ever spend 
550 a dozen, if you like to spread joy. 



Itk. Codi Omrse • Ubdt VI^tm's MkMt • Pctcriwough NH 03458-1 107 

Or wl 6O3-«4-O0St • Fax 603-924-9327 




BUY AMERICAN, BETTER PRICE AND QUALFTY 



The SG2000 HF iransceiver is type accepted tof cocnnieFniaf and marine service 
made with traaillanal U.S. comm&nclai radio quaHly (and oi C33urse ii can be used 
on Ehe ham Dan^s also). WhUe the Japanese radios have 2 tmal transistors that 
s\ra\ni to put out tOO wafl& on the low bands and only 75-85 watts oi> ten meters, 
I he SG2000 has 4 targe transistors inat leal along at 150 waits on AU THE 
6AWDS IWCLUDIWG 10 METEFlSi Sonw Df (he SG2000 feaCufes are; 1) A 
control head remotabie (no special kn necisssaryj up to 150' away from the rig. 
p«rlect for aulomotsites and boals. Up to B heads can be LttitLied and used aA 
imercoma a^so. 2) The fargest display of any HF transceiver. 3) 644 pre- 
programmed memodes and 100 u&ar programmabte memories. 4) operab^ irom 
-50F i-45C\ 10 IBS F <+S5C). Yen want <jual% tighl? Here is wtial E^eRY 
SG?OO0 (TCJQt Cfldure belorg Ihey re shifSiped frnrn lhe liKtpry: 1} Ttwy"f» iactOfV 
a:gned, 2> EVERY SG2000 te key«d dcwffi at tiiR power iCW 150 Watte) mio an 
open antenna tor atiout 10 seconds, it>ert conr^TCted to a snorted aivlefvia ar>d 
keye4 down Kir on MMHiOnaJ 10 secorxls. 3) EVERY SG2000 ^ pul in tf« 
•Bunn-W rsck and ksv&i down l« 24 Wuis non-slop al tu-i powef CW Oont &y ITiat wm the foreign ratios^ 4J EVERY SG2000 to 
Ihen re^aiec^sd ic - - - - r^ and pot in Ehe TOnnjRE flACK* where iney are keyed on and ©tf evefy <0 seconds tor ?4 hours. 5j 
Tilt SG2000 b tn^ r&^c -^ and ai conani firetions are vanted to ensile mai ms micropfocassor is up to spec THEN anO 
ONLY THifel IS THE SG2eoo AOjOWED TO LEAVE THE FACTOflY 

111* ijeBom ftia is pc^ce, you know N^ gxportsive corrvnerciaJ ni^ ana nomisiy. «e am se«ng Sia SQ^OOO BELOW DEAi-ER COST 
at on»y St. 449.00 eac^> Thai's a S4QQ.Q0 sflnrtngs^ We nuafsniw Hw b«st phs& 

The SG230 SMART TUtMER is (he Oest MF autotuner at any price, and lo 
promole a product that is made in the U&A, were oHertng ii ai me guaranteed 
best price ot onty 5449.00^1 WHY THE 3G230? BECAUSE: When yotj lune an 
antenna at It's base you are resonating the anionnat instead of Just maiching the 
coax to the radio as wSlh other tuners such as the Atsc, etc. The resut! VOUR 
SIGMAL GETS OUT MUCH BETTEP. The Kenwood AT50, AT4S0 and other 
similar lunera cari only match 3i1 mismatch^ (YES only 3:1) so forge Emaiehtnsj 
anything but a fairly decent antenna. The SG230 can match Irom 0.5 Ohm to 1 
kllohm antennas fup to a 200:1 mismatch}, so II can easily match rantiom viHres, 
dipoies. rain-gultens. shopping carts, elc, The result MOPE POWER, 

Tq onto. wraJ chcdi or money «d*r w«h » $0 kw ahijpi^ 
0I&3# Boran, UPS wfl asA <Se»i»ft and T«ta|)hdn* nutfberlo: 








^ Prices 



S&rvirtg The LORD 
Sines 1967 



Joe Brancato 

THE HAM CONTACT 

PO Box 3624, Dept 73 
Long Beach, CA 90803 

CAR**=bem*Addei'4*-SatesTa* Alwfai. Hiwwm. and Canafen Bw^terta p*wae «nd U S Money Ontef 
+ Sl7tOroritHppihg, 

tr you wtsh more information please send a SASE to the above address. For COD orders, cal 
(310H33-5eeO, outside of CA Orders On[y caJi (fl00)933-HAM4 and teave a message. 



DSP II Filter 




What is DSP? DSP allows the "constnjclion* of 
varioiis filters of great complexity by using 
computer code. This attows us to have easy 
access lo a variety of filters, each perfectly 
optimized lor whatever mode we are operating. 
The DSP 11 has been designed to operate in 10 
different modes. Four lifters af& optimized for 
reducing inte iterance to SSB phone signals from 
CW, heterodynes and random noise interference. 
Four more filters operate as "brick-wair' CW 
bandpass fillers. The remaining two filters are 
designed for reliable recovery oT RTTY and HF 
packet radio jntonnation signals, A single front 
pane! switch selects any of these titters. Easy 
hookup io rigs speaker jack. 

.SM9-95 
$11.95 



W9GR DSP Rfter 

12V DC Power Supply, 



rmwT-m**a-*»-*Mm**'9*-i- 



Personal Autojtatch 




Make and receive phone calls Irom your mobile 
rig or handie-talkie with your own personal 
autopatch. Connection is easy — just hook-up to 
the mike and speaker jacks on your base station 
rig and plug into the phone line! Comptete control 
is assured thfough touch-tone access codes that 
you set and chanoe at wilL Long distance toll 
access is coni rolled by special code that you set. 
preventing fraudulent usage, All programmable 
codes and set-ups are stored in special non- 
volaiitt memory immune to power lailufes. 
Repeater owners use the SDP'600 as well for 
reliable and solid repeater autopatches. Power 
required Is 12 vofts DC at lOO MA. ExperierH;e 
the Ireedom of owning your own autopatch^ on 
you own treQuency+ to use when and as you 
wish. The SOP-600 is made in the USA and 
carries a one year warranty. 
SDP-600 Personal Autopatch. fully wir§<f......-$248.95 

SDPA 12 voh pow^rsupply unit S1t.&5 



rCom Transceiver Contrcpl 
Camputer Interface 




The j'Com Transceiver Control Computer 
Interface is funciionally ider^tical to the Kenwood 
IF-232C, Icom CT-17, Yaesii FIF-232C. Ten-Tec 
305 and Heath computer interfaces. It will work 
with all radios and rig control software which use 
these interfaces. 

• No ©xtemal power supply is necessary. The 
t<;om TC interfaces require very little power for 
operationThis power is obtained directly from 
the computer COM M port. 

• Alf electronics are enclosed In the shielded 
DB-2S connector hood^RFI susceptibility and 
radiation is reduced. 

• Fully assembled and tested. 

• Fully Hardware and Software Compatible. 
Works wUh all rig control Eed soltware — 
Free shareware disk includedi 



RAMSEY ELECTRONICS, INC 

793 CANNING PARKWAY VJCTOH NV 14564 

ORDERS CALL 
1-800-446-2295 

ORDERS ONLY 

TcCHiORDER/INFO f?16)S24-teill FAX [716>924-4S5S 
TERMS Sahslaclion guaranteed Eidmm* *or 10 days. It not 
-^leased i«lym m oregiriLa^ fonn Tor Tfifunfi. Atkl S4 95 for shippir-g, 
landlrng and koauranca For tpffeian order* add 20*i lor sufface 
mail. COD (U S onl¥) add S5,CK), Ofder* under 5?Q add S3.00 H¥ 
res-dents a^^ ^'n ill ft i lai. 90-day piarts MrarraitlY ion kit parts. 1- 
yea.r parts & i^b&f warranty on wired units, 



[•COM • 793 CANNING PKWY * VfCTOR. NY 14564 



CIRCLe 3«4 ON READER 5f FtVlCE CARD 



CIRCLE 53 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 59 



Nymbef 1B on your Feedback card 



^m riymoef i«s on your re 

Above & beyond 



a L Houghton WB6IGP 
San Diego Mfcrowave Group 
6345 Badger Lake Ave. 
San Diego CA 92119 



SWR Primer for VHF 
Through Microwave 

SWR? Sure, you say. I know how rt 
works. A low SWR makes everything 
work lust f»ne. Qut as frequency in- 
creases are we stilt comtortabEe wftli 
different measuremenl lechniques at 
these higher frequencres'? I am sure 
we are all familiar with maif^hing an- 
tennas 10 minimum SWR in the tow 
VHF'to-UHF frequency ranges (146 to 
450 MHz). I am presuming that you 
have similar amateur4ype SWR mea- 
suring equipment to wfial I use for Ire- 
quencies below 500 MHz. When used 
above their Intended frequency range 
of operation, these instruments give 
readings that are highly suspect, or 
even give gross errors. What then are 
the acceptable types for different fre- 
quencies of operation? 

The basic SWR meter used in 
these descnptions is a Swan Electron- 
ics dual SWR bridge that I obtained 
many years ago It was intended for 
operation in the 2 to 150 MHz frequen- 
cy fange. T?ie circuitry for this type ol 
meter is shown in Figure 2. For the 
time being tefs describe a singte me- 
ter device and its circurtfy. The basic 
bridge is balanced with two coupler 
arms, one going left and one going 
right in respect to the termination re- 
sistors. 

Both parts are connected to diodes 
tor RF rectification and the outputs of 
the diodes are bypassed to ground 
with a capacitor. The detected RF at 
thrs point IS converted to DC and is 
displayed on a small mA meter for 
measurenrtents. For tjest results, each 
arm of the bridge should be matched 
exactly, noi only in construction bui in 
component part setection. 

WelJ. now you tvave Ihis SWR me- 
ter and you want to know just how 



VHF and Above Operation 



good your meter is. What can be done 
to prove how good and to what fre- 
quency Its measurements are accu- 
rate? What Instruments do we use to 
make sure the simple SWR bndge is 
even telling us the truth? This and oth- 
er questions are the topic for this 
month's column. First a little set-up 
discussion on SWR. 



SWR 

The benefrt of having devices per- 
foim with minimum SV^ is the same 
at any frequerx^ of operation A good 
match between equipment ihiat is con- 
nected together determines bow much 
power IS delivered to a load and not 
wasted. If we are off (mismatched), 
lots of power can be wasted m an im- 
proper Fmpedance match. SWR does 
not only apply to the transmitter and 
antenna system, but to Interconnects 
between circuit modules Wks rnixers 
arul RF preamplifiers as well. 

In electronic circuitry most circuits 
are interconnected with 50 ohms be- 
cause It is convenient and easy to 
use. Coaxial cable is available for this 
impedance lo make interconnects sim- 
pie. with appropriate connectors. Hav- 
ing the fnput and outpi/t of a device 
matched to 50 ohms altows an easy 
transfer of otf>er replace meni units or 
simplifies trouble -testing, as all de- 
vices, including the test equipment, 
are the same impedanra; 50 ohms, 

Usuaily these modules are fonned 
together into a much larger circuit all 
interconnected to form a converter or 
system. Using circuitry in tills fashion, 
compared to a single large circuit inte- 
gration, might be nice in commercial 
applications, but in amateur systems 
we never seem to reach the final 
stage of perfection. We are always 
modifying our circuitry to suit our 
changing needs. Without mtercon- 
nects this modification woukJ be nearty 
impossible. 

Modules that are part of an entire 
system lend Ihemsehres to easier re- 




Photo A. FXR siatted fine and CBrnage assembly showing extemai detector diode 
(coaxfai) used for RF detection. 

60 73 Amateur Radio Today » May. 1 995 



RF 

SimrtF 




^- TvLaad 



An I - RTTtpliffer 
ror Stun Test 



Callbratton - %m\ Meter To Fufd ftnd fid just Forfufl Scale Heading. 
Measurement -SetMeterTo neuRnd Read Scale On Meter inSlUR 
Ratl€. 




Port 2 



Fort I 







1 










1 




1 -J- 




Ports 


X 




^ 







Ta Load 
ItnderTest 



T 



1 . MeasureFoufer @>P[trl 1 

Use dutiable AltenuatEirlii 

P m le c t P Q uier Me te r He ad, 

HecordHeadifig- 

Z. Connect Teil Load @Piirt I, 

3. MeAiure Paurer @ Port 5« 

Ftecofiineading. 

4.SUJR Is Ratio Df tonuard Potuer 

f Port 1 1 U». ieftec ted Pouier (Pari S.) 



Sample Qutput 
•Haled Lois 
tll-2»-3idSl 



lerminatlnn 



Pomcr 

Detector 

Head 




Ml c mu/a u e Pome rMet er 



Figure L Basic SWR indicator vs. dlrectlonai coupler. 



pair. In most amateur microwave sys- 
tems this is the method of constnjction 
instead of a single monoFithic structure 
lor a microwave transceiver. I like to 
refer to this lype of construciion as 
''Microwave Building Blocks." 

Matching or minimizing SWR im- 
proves cirojil operatk^n and reduces 
excess loss. In some applications it is 
desirabte to make a wide frequency 
matching circuit. This type of match or 
load ES usually done in its simplest 
form, a "T'-iype attenuator This is 
constructed with three resistors in a 
"T"* configuration, and forms a bulk 
forced resistive matching scheme to 
terminate a device. To test this match, 
an SWR meter of some sort is needed 
and measurements need to be made 
to test the circunry. So much for rrKid- 
ules; let's get into the meat and potB' 
toes of |ust what is going on with SWR 
measufements and how to test your 
SWR meter at different frequerffiies. 

SWR meters. iKidges, or directional 
couplers are all ttie same in principle, 
ITte drfference being m the frequency 



they are made to operate at. Almost 
ali units employ an internal diode to 
detect a portion of dtrectionaiized RF 
power. The output of this detector 
feeds 3 calibrated indicator to deter- 
mine circuit performance. Did I say an 
SWR meter or bridge is similar to a 
direclionat coupler? Yes; you bet. 
However, the directiorkal coupler is on- 
ly a portion of an SWR meter system 
arxl normally rt can be used for other 
things. If you look at a schematic dia- 
gram of an SWR n^ter circuit, the por- 
tion of the RF pickoff is actually 
formed by a directional coupler sam- 
pling the RF. See Figure 1 . 

The description In Figure 2 is appli- 
cable to e Ether single or duel SWR me- 
ters or directional couplers. Many 
SWR meters uhhze two diodes to pro- 
vide detection and display to two dif- 
ferent irKJicaiors at the same time, one 
for forward power and the other for re- 
flected power. One half ol the drcyitry 
is used when only a smgle meter is 
used with a reversing switch, as 
shown in Ffgure 1 . By using two direc- 




Photo B. Military Surplus UHF SWR meter for 400 MHz, 25 watts forward, to read 
reflected push reflected power button (black). 



HAM 






National Talk Radio Show With Len Winkler, KB7LPW 

America's Only 

Ham Radio 
StiowOnThe 





t 



Bands! 



Sundays 

6:00 pm EST 



Weekly Co-Hosts, John Moore, NJ7E and Ned Stearns, AA7A 

Weekly DX Update With Lee Fibkel, KY7M 

Tune in each week for national ham radio news, FCC news, weekly guests from 
the amateur radio community, ham trivia contests, prizes, listener call-in and morel 

Sponsored in part by 73 Amateur Radio Today and ICOM. 





Ham Radio & More Affilliates 


AZ: KFNN 1510 am 


PHOENIX 


MA* BOSTON CABLE CHANNEL 3BB BOSTON 


OK: KADS 1240 am OKLAHOMA CITY 


CT: WATR 1320 am 


HARTFORD 


Ml: WMKT 1270 am TRAVERSE CITY, CADILLAC 


OK: KTMC 1400 am TULSA. MCALESTER 


PL WFFG 1300 am 


MIAMI, KEYS 


MOiKNWA 16O0a/n SPRINGFIELD 


OR:KBNP 1410am PORTLAND 


Fb WlPC l2S0an 


lAMPA^SI.Ptlb 


NE: KICS 1550 ain HASTING. UNCOLN 


PA WJMW SSOam SCRANTON 


IL WKTA 1330 3m 


CHTCAGO 


NCiWCRY 14e0am RALE iGH DURHAM 


PA: WJMW 5S0 am SCRANTON. WILKES BARE 


IL WBQZ ISTOsn 


ALTON 


NC:WE£e 990 am RALEIGH DURHAM 


SC: WPCC 1410 am CUNTON 


IN^ WPOi 1300 ^m 


HUNTINGTOH FT. WAYI« 


MCtWQAJ 560 am NORFOLK, POflTSlwttTH 


TE: WHWB 740 am KNOXVIIXE 


Kf: WMTA I3fl0am 


CENTRAL CITY, EVANSVILLE 


NCrWSKY 1230 am QREENVILE, SPARTENaURG 


TX: KtVY 1290 am CROCKET 


U^: KGGM 93.5 fm 


MONROE 


NM:KICA 980 am AMARILLO 


VE: WSYB RUTLAND 


MA:WN8H 1340 am 


NEW BEDFORD. PROVIDENCE 


OH; WO 1010 am CHARLESTON. HUNTINGTON 


VW:WWNR 620 am BECKLEY 



Ham Radio & More is aiso avaiiabie on Sateiiito! 
Spacenol 3, Transponder 9, 6.8 Audio for Home Disli (Anolog). 

Find out what radio station airs "Ham Radio & More" in your local area 

by call ing the originating stationn, KFNN, at 602-241-1510. 

For sponsorship information contact Ron Cohen at 602-241-0482 



Inpul 



roriLiard 



RerieciPd 




Output 



SLfJR 



Output 

3 




I 



f 



Reflected 
(SHIRT 

Pomer 
Meter 



i 



T 



I 



fonuard 

Meier 



I 



C > Bypass 

I - Small Tnrnid TransmKlPr 



Figure 2. Basic duat indicator SWR bridge circuitry. Ad\fantage: its easy to use, 
Disadvantage: its iimited to iow-frequer}cy use only (not usable above 200 MHz), 



tionat cou piers cann^cted as \n Figure 
3. the operation is the same as a simi- 
lar lower frequency ttual-mefared 
SWR nr>etef. 

The direclronal coupler sTiowrt in 
Rgufie 3 has Ihiee ports; 1, 2, and 3, 
Pod 1 is usually the input; Poft 2 is the 
output; and Port 3 is Itie test or cou- 
pled pod. When BF is applied to Port 
1 i( flows to Port 2 wrlh very minimal 
loss, tt's esserrtially a direct section of 
coaxial cable or waveguide In the very 
high microwave frequencies. The pow- 
er is coupled into a branch arm of Fori 
3 through a small slof in the outer 
shield between Ports 1 and 2, and the 
termination and Port 3. The amount of 
coupNng available at the sampEe port 
(Port 3) ts indicated on each coupler 
and expressed in a dB loss factor like 
10 or 20 dB. The coupled loss is de- 
termined by the openir^ (stze) ot the 
slot coupJing both transmission lines. 
The lOJiger the slot length the lower 
the ffequency of the directional cou- 
pler'' IS a basic rule. It s kind of Nke 
looking at two pieces of coax cable 
connected together with a hole in each 
shield and the two cables joined {insu- 
latod) at the common opening in the 
shields forcross-coupNng- 

If we assume a 10 dB directional 
coupler, forward power measured at 
Porl 3 wiil be 10 dB iess than ihe actual 
power that is applied at Port t, If the 
load at Port 2 is a good match, little or 
no reflection will feed back into Port 2 
from the termination at that port, if pow- 
er does feed back (poof SWR) it will be 
absorbed m the termination at tffce end 
of Port 3 and not intertere wiih the for- 
ward power in Ihe coypler, (The cou- 
pler tn this exanq^fe is norma L f)0t re- 
versed.) Hie basic cofioepi to remem- 
ber is Itiat me directional coupler has 
directfonatfty, the ability to discriminale 
between forward and reverse power. 



Let me state that again another 
way. If power (s fed at the same end 
as the termination on a single direc- 
tional coupler (Port Ik the termination 
end of the coupled arm will not see 
forward power but rather a detector 
connected at the opposite efid {Port 3) 
wili only see forward power. Now re- 
verse the above coupler ar^d add a 
second directional coupler to the first 
ge?tjp 10 form a forward and reflection 
coupler. Let's look at what is happen- 
ing on the first coupler. The same rule 
appfies to both couplers with the ex- 
ception that the first coupler ts re- 
versed. 

When forward power flows (second 
coupler) from Port 1 to Port 2 there Is 
very little loss (0.3 dB) Power from 
Port t couples iniQ the directiortal arm 
of Port 3. all fon^ard power minus cou- 
pltr>g loss flows into Poft 3, All othef 
power 1$ output to ttie load or 
antenna at Port 1. As far as 
coypler l is concerned (Rgure 
3), jysl ttie reverse is true. Be- 
cause the main feed is on Port 
2 to Port 1 , Port 3 will only see 
reftected power 

Now the magic — because 
the directional coupler is direc- 
tional, Any power that is not 
absorbed In the main load, an 
antenna lermlnatJon or whai- 
ever, in Porl 1 of coupler 1 
(Figure 3) will be reflected 
back towards Port t and is 
CQupfed into Port 3. At Port 3, 
coupler 1 power measured 
there wHI be only reflected 
power components less the 
coupling loss. With the for- 
ward power known you can 
calculate your SWfl ralio us- 
ing the just-catculated reflec- 
tion power and obtain the 
SWR with this directFonai cou- 



pler method. 

Now thai we have gone through 
this directionaF coupler magic, have I 
tficked you from the basic SWR meter 
circuit? Mo way. Take a look at trw cir- 
cuitry as It was developed, usmg a 
slow, meticulous, hopefully lucid 
thought pattern^ Doesn't the circuitry 
k>ok quite a bit lil«e tfie basic SWR me- 
ter circuit lotjnd in the simple SWR 
meter for 2 meters using two inductors 
and individual dtode detectors? Of 
course, the meters and detectors are 
missing, but the circuitry Is the same, 
just adapted lO different frequencies. 

The reason we don't see directional 
couptefs at lower Frequencies is that if 
they were made with transmission 
lines they woukj be too targe, Nomial- 
ly, transmission line directional cou- 
plers are used from 1 ,000 MHz to welt 
over 24.000 MH^. JusI observe the 
frequency of use mart<ed on each cou* 
pier akHig with its coupling loss and 
decide if it can be useful for your 
needs. A basic rule Of thumbs large 
couplers, low frequency; small cou- 
piers, high frequency. 

Cafibration of SWR Meters 

How, then, do you check an SWR 
meter to see if it Js telling you the 
truth? There are two ways. One is to 
duplicate different mismatches with 
carbon resistors to cause an SWR 
meter (reflection) to indicate, and thfe 
other is to make an SWR reading on 
the SWR meter itself. First. tet*s use 
the cartx>n resistors to calibrate the 
meter scale of an SWR meter reflect- 
ed power meter scale. 

With a 50-ohm dummy load or 50- 
ohm resistor of suitable power capabil- 
ity there should be a perfect or 1:1 
SWR reading, indicating a perfect 
match, or minimum SWR. Now, if we 
replace the dummy load with resistors 
of different values we can simulate a 
different amount of SWR reflected 
power and read the same on the me- 
ter if all is operating welL For a 2:1 
SWR. use a tOO-ohm lerminatiofi: for 
3:1, use 150 ohms; and for a 1.5:1 
SWR. use a 75-ohm resistor Each 



time set fonward power to full scale 
and then read reflected power read* 
ings. 

Jf you want, for fun* do an SWR on 
the SWR meter by placing it ir^ line 
with a termination on \he output and 
making an SWR reading on the SWR 
meter. See rf the meter circuitry is a 
good match to 50 ohms and does not 
upset the transmission line by having 
a poor SWR by itself In commercial 
use we term this: "What is the return 
loss of the device (SWR meter)?" A 
return toss of better than 20+ dB is 
considered very good. What does re- 
turn loss signify? Well, it's just another 
way of stating what the SWR of the 
component or device is. A 20 dB re- 
turn toss is the same as an SWR read- 
ing of 1.2 to 1. That means that the 
device (SWR meter) is r>oi capable of 
resolving to finer measurements of 
less than 1^ to 1 . See Table 1 to com- 
pare return loss to SWR measure- 
menls. 

If a single directional coupler is 
used for forward measurements and 
then reversed to read reflected power, 
dissimilarity in different couplers can 
be eliminated. The single type of me- 
ter is rnost accurate In that on[y one 
diode and the same circuitry is used to 
make both readings, so Ihe chance of 
difference in circuitry is minimum to 
each reading. 

With a two-diode or two-meter indi- 
cator, two different circuits are calltxat- 
ed to display readings. Imbatance Or 
differences in unmatctied diodes wll 
give erroneous results The duat cir* 
cuitry sf)ould look and be e^ectricatly 
"twins" to provide meaningful read- 
ings. These units are not calibrated as 
time goes on — they're relied on as is. 
They might be just fine, but lo be sure, 
check them. 

There is little dfTference between 
making an SWR reading at £ meters 
and at a microwave frequency. In each 
case, some form of test configuration 
of the test setup must be used. The 
biggest problem between VHF and mi- 
crowave SWR meters is cost. The 
SWR meter for use at 2 meters is quite 



RF 
Source 



Coupler 1 Reuersed 



Coupter 2 Norfflil 



t 



Port 2 



Port 

3 



Port 

1 






Port 
I 



Port 
2 

B3- 



r i ^ 



f 



Term 



Measure Hettected Pouter 



Term 



Measure Fonuard Poiuer 





l^irrotiiave Pouter Meter I B MHz To 12.4 GHz -^ 10 06 M Maa, 

EHtendeilR^ngelUHItfllteriuatars. 



Figure 3. Two directional couple fs used for SWR mBasuremertts. 



62 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



mexpensfve compared 10 a microwave 
3WB system because of simple txjik 
supfily and use. Manufacturers can 
sell more SWR meters for VHF !lian 
they can for micfo^ave use. 

The circuitry used in a VHF SWR 
meter ts somewftai large compared to 
a microwave SWR meter, Wrm a VHF 
device at 146 MHz. a quarter wave- 
. length is about 19 inches long. Circuit- 
ry should be a small fraction of this 
wavelength factor to be effective. Re- 
member, Its OK to use square corners 
afvd make long wire runs al 80 meters; 
however, the same type o1 consrrwc* 
lion at 2 meters Is a death senience, 
and at microwave dealh was a hun^ 
dred year? ago. 

The same analogy applies to a 
comparison between 2 meters and 
1296 h^H;?. As frequency increases cir- 
cuit size and interconnections to the 
RF circuitry must decrease, keeping It 
small in relation lo I he wavelength fac- 
tor (2 meters/146 MHi = 20-27 inch, 
3/4 cm/ 1296 hAHi = 2,28 inches). As 
you can see Irom the two quarter 
wavelengths being compared there is 
almost a 10 to I difference in wave- 
length factors fof component seteclkm. 

Errors can jump up when compo- 
nents used in conslruclion become 
large compared to the wavelength fac- 
tor. For example, a good selection 
(component si2e considerations) for 
1296 MHz would be to select a chip 
(Je ad less} resistor rather Iftan a U2- 
watt carbon composilion lo terminate a 
ctrcuiL The difference beh^een the two 
resistors is ihe leads of Ihe 1/2- watt 
resistor, which at 1296 MHz becomes 
reactive and looks like an inductor in 
series with ttre resistor element. 

Low frequency SWR meters can 
use these components with lillte detri- 
ment and perfonn quite well As fre- 
quency increases, more expensive 
component parts are required lo be 
able 10 make accurate measure me nts^ 

Return loss is iike SWR, a ratio of 
forward power to reflection power and 
is expresed in dB. The reflectior) prod- 
uct is Ihe power bounced back from 
the load due lo mismatched 
impedances at the toad. If everything 
is peffect (assuming no loss or reflec- 
tions in Ihe SWR bridge), all power 
from the source will t:^ absortied in the 



load after passing through the SWR 
bridge, Now, Ihe world is not perfecl 
and sofne loss does exist in the bndge. 
Wtiat these Imperfections cause in re- 
sped to the perfect concftion is the re- 
flection of some RF power back lo Ihe 
source. How much depends on how 
good or poor the match is. 

In commercial calibratbn the return 
loss measurement is usually made 
with directional couplers and level -sen- 
si live sweep oscillators to test ihe de- 
vice in question- In most amateur ap- 
plications a direclional coupler operat- 
ing at the fixed frequency of operation 
will produce accurate sinQl&4reqiiency 
readjnc^. 

Mall Box Comments 

Jack Lindauer WA6EFM wants it to 
be known that he is putting together a 
Swan 250 6 meter transceiver users' 
group. He wants to exchange informa- 
tion on the use of this specific 
transceiver, including modifications 
and basic infonmallon. To contact Jack, 
write or call: 18881 Brymer Court. 
Northrldge, CA 91326; (S18) 831- 
0515, 

I just received a brief fetfer from 
Marcelo Bonotto Chhspim, Cuntiba PR 
Bra si I. Marcelo states that he is an 
avid reader of 73 and of ihis column, 
but is having a very difficult time ob- 
taining information, articles, and prod- 
ucts and components for mtcrowave 
ham-band construction projects. 
Marcelo is interested in Ixiilding oscil- 
lators, synthesizers. preamptiHens and 
mixefs. Corriponents he is interested in 
include Teflon PC board and SMA con- 
nectors, in addition lo newsletters and 
products ^at are available for the am- 
ateur mtcrowave enthusiast. 

This letter points oul to me very 
strongly that we in !he U.S. live in a 
land of abundance. Ifs probably not 
Ihe abundance thai we pictured^ but 
when we think of what we have avail- 
able \n comparison to other amateurs 
in the world, and what great efforts 
they go through lo assemble compo- 
nents and material for a project. I think 
they deserve a very big complimeni for 
their love of amateur radio and con- 
Struction in genera?. Sore, we can 
go lo the local Radio Shack and listen 
to the sales counterperson say. 



Dicide Delator 

end P 1-0 be 



Source 



e 




suJaMetej- 



taiibrsletf 

Miauefnetil 



t 



.^^ To Load Or 
RfitennaTa 
lesl 



Slotted transmis^JDii: Line 
HayBeCoaHialOrLilBueguldiT 








^^CMUf^iFelength 



TI 



piNDifideModiiUtor 



t 



length pffloltpei 1 ine Lang Enough Tn Contain FulJ Stne lUaue 
Of FtEqii^nty Being Tested. tK^nipie: 1295I^Hz -?3CMar 
npproHtmately^iNLirng. 



Figure 4, FXR micFOwave SWR siottmf Hne and SWR detector Modei HP^ fSD ba- 
sic se!up with HP pin diode modulaior Slotted fine method of SWR measurement 



^fcrowave* what's tftat?" but stiH ma- 
tehal is fairly easy for U.S. amateurs to 
obtain. 

In response to Marcelo's query I 
have sent him information on some of 
the kits and PC boards that I have 
availablSH In addition to the names of 
other manufacturers and microwave 
groups Ihal publish newsletters to 
keep us informed about our amateur 
activities in the microwave realm. In- 
cluded is the North Texas Microwave 
Society, cJQ Wes Atchison WA5TKU, 
Rt. 4 Box 565. Sanger. TX 76266. 
Dues are S12 a year and ihey issue a 
newsletter six times a year. 

In response to many queries on sur- 
plus material that I have available, 
here is a Short list of mtcrowave relat- 
ed items: Qualcomm synthesisers for 
2.6 GHz that can be converted lo oin 
Pt-L with a 10 Mt4z ctodc from 2.1 GHz 
to 2-6 GH2 m 2,3 MHz siep Si^es. oul- 
put power +8 dBm, cosl: $15 each; 
Ouak:omm mutlpliefs 2.x OHz times 5 
normalty to T3.1 GHz, mod tO times 4, 
will multiply synth at 2.SS5 GHz {x4) to 
10220 I^Hz power outpul +7 dBm, 



cosl: Si 5 each; 1 watt FET amp PC 
board a! 14 GHz mod to 10368 MHz. 
-5 dSm in, produces 1W out with re- 
tuning board, cost; $25 each; 12 GHz 
receiver mod to three -stage preamp at 
10 GHz, cost: $12 each, old Style; new 
style RF preamp less mods witi oper- 
ate at 10 GHz w/27 dB gain 3 Nf, re- 
tuneable to 1.1 dB N1. cost: S30 each 
Prices are plus postage ($3 mIn.K 
sales taK for California deslinatJons, 

Well, thafs il for Ihis month. As 
always I will t^ glad to answer ques- 
!k>ns concerning this month's topic and 
related amateur microwave subjects. 
Please send an SASE for a prompt 
response 73 Chuck WB6IGP. 



SWR Reading 


Return Loss 


1:1 


66 dB 


T1:1 


26 dB 


1.2:1 


20dB 


1.3:1 


17.7 dB 


1.4:1 


15.5 dB ' 


1.5:1 


13.9 dB 


2:1 


9.5 dB 


3:1 


GdB 



Tsbie 1 



ONV SAFETY BELT CO. 

P.O. Box 404 • Ramsey, N J 07446 

800-345-5634 

Phone & FAX 201 327-2462 



ONV Safety Belt With Seal Harness 
-4L„f/ l|j^ » $89.95 

** OSHA 

W« Ship 

Worldwide 

Order Desk Open 

7 DaysA/VeeK 



ONV Tool Pouch $15.95 

AddS4 00 Fof Handling VISA M/C CHECK 



ONV Belt W'O Seat Harness 
S74.95 



CIRCLE 102 ON flEADER SERVICE CARD 



RF Shielded Steel Boxes 







m Einvdifl 3pAsv«r of unwifc a 



Uc^fc, 


ul1ll*f pi< 


1 


94 


KtiililDi 


IB 


mi 


lJ|it«14 


tx 


Ea-s 


«Jtill^t 


UE 


S-l 


tit 111 It 


m» 


Sfrf 


ijijriii 


mm 


3M 


4ii£riii 


nm 


sa-T 


titiriM 1 


nm 


m* 


u»ir»ti 


rs 


S&4 


ttiiri a 


»29 


J&FO 


JIUTl U 


im 


se^Ei 


*.iHTi n 


n.Ts 


Ft 3-1 


nm^!«PfV^taiMpfr* 


H 


rra-i 


iiMilef flWDC iwrtfin lyp* 


1» 



FREE EKPANQEP1*BS CDNSTHUCTOR'S CATALOCi 



a 



PPEPA3D ORDERS SHIP GROUND FffEE 
{U tr ATCA. CAMADA L MEXICO^ 

SE5COM, INC 

?1!>D WAHD DH ^^LNDEF^50N. ttfV HOIS USA 
- USACANADA (MOi 534 345T 
FAX CMOJ 551 -2749 
(7d£) 5€S^3400 FAX (7112) 5e&-4iSt 




■PV 



PEHgOMi- COMrUt^R REPFATFR COMmJULgjR 




Sfr€4t^ j^W ^?Ca€£^ 




</ Full Duplex Autopaich 
•''911 Ernergency Access 
•/ Reverse Autopalch *^ToH Restriction 

^ Voice Mail • Voices ID'S • BSR X10 
^^Voice/Tone/DTMF Paging v^Scfiedular 
■^ Lin ks / p rogra mmabl e Gou rtesy Ton es 
w^ Hand ware Logic I/O v^HF Remote Control 
*^ Morse Code Practice </ Remote Base 

PGRQ/2 Combines the power of your 
XT/ATplattorm with a high quality play arid 
record voice digitizer creating Ihe ultimate 
repeater controller. Z^^^H^ ^693 

Fax:5S3-47t6 mS 286- f5^8 



ClFTCtE 1f7 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



OnCtE 198 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 63 



^^ 



Atv 



Number 19 on your Feedback card 



Bin Brown WBSELK 
c/o 73 Magazine 
70 Rouie 202 North 
Peleftxmugh NH 0345S 

Danish 10 GHz ATV 

This month I'd like lo bring you 
some ATV news from Europe. A very 
active group from Denmark has ac- 
complished some remarkable ATV DX 
contacts on the 1 GHz band this past 
sufTirner. 

The First Test 

Ouring the Danish Microwave 
Week {mid-Jur« 1994). numerous sta- 
lions were set yp ovef the region with 
voice coniacis being made on TO, 24, 
AT, 76 and 145 GHz, In order io try 
Somettiing new^ B|ame DZI UM and 
Soren OZ3VC brought along equip- 
n^ni for 10 GHz ATV. The Iransmitter 
consisted of a frequency-modulated 
DSO (directly on 10.4 GHz), followed 
by a 500 milliwatt power amplifier 
stage (sound was transmitted with a 



Ham Television 

5.5 MHz subcamer). To receive the 
prctufe. they used a modi lied down- 
convener from a satelJite TV receiver 
with 3 noise figure of appro^imaiely 
1 dB toltowed by an IF stage and de- 
modulator. The dishes used were 
made by Procom. 

The firs! tests were made just prior 
to the activity week over a 19-mlle (31- 
km) path with excellent results. During 
the actual event (6/12/94) they at- 
tempted a contact between 0Z1UM in 
Spodsb^rg and 0Z3VC in Skagen, a 
distance of 129 miles (209 km). Unfof- 
lunaiely. conditions were not good 
enough to establish a contact and 
023VC nvjved his station to a closer 
site at Trehple on Mols. This Ume, a 
very successful ATV contact was 
made over a 56-mlte (SO-km) pattv 

The Long HatJl 

On July 7th 021UM and Steen 
0Z9ZI made a new attempt at estab- 
lishing an ATV contact from Skagen lo 
Spodsbierg, For a talk-back frequency, 




Photo 5. The group at Spodsbjerg wamh Sieen OZ9ZI appear on thBir monitor 
over a f29-mite (209'kmf pain. 




Photo A. // (o r}: OZ5DI OZULA aftd OZWM operate the W GHz ATV station at 
Spodshjerg. 



10 Qh\z SSB was used. Altt^ou^ itie 
OZlUM team at Spodsbjerg had to 
work with an open waveguide (no 
dish) on their voice station, the SSB 
contact was made witfi an S-6 signal 
level on both ends. At approximately 
20:30 local ttme, the ATV signal was 
received for the first time. At first mere 
was considerable QSB, but at around 
2100 signals became stable. At this 
time they changed directions and sent 



pictures from Skagen lo Spodsbjerg to 
make a two-way 030. According to 
Steen OZ9Z1, rt was a very fascinating 
experience walchjng OZIUM. 0Z3VC. 
0Z5DI and 021JLA appear on his 
monitor in full color with the Spodst)- 
jerg lighthouse in Ihe background 
whiie he was sitting on the sand dunes 
in Skagen nearly 129 miles (209 km) 
sway! TNX to Steen 0Z9Z! for tjw 
above info. 




Photo C, The SpodsOjerg crew is shown as received in coior by Steen OZBZt at 
Skagen. Photo by Steen OZ9ZI 



MAKE CIRCUIT BOARDS 
THE NEW, EAST WAF 




WITH TEC-200 FILM 

JUST 3 EASY STEPS: 

• Copy Circuit pattern on TEC-200 film 
using any plain paper copier 

• Iron film on to copper clad board 
» P^ off film and etch 

convenient 8 1/2x11 size 
With Complete Lnstructlons 

SATLSFAUnON GUARANTEED 

5 Sheets for $4.95 10 Sheets on^y $6,95 

adti $200 postage 

The MEADOWLAKB Corp, 

Dept. £ P.O. Box 1555 
Oneco. PL 34264 




Factory Authorized Dealer & Service For 

KENWOOD 

YAESU 

ICOM 



CaII Us ftir 
Gr^mi Pricms & Great Service 






JI^CU 111 AMfl 



CENTHR 



urs AMATEUR RADIO ^nntu 






Slow Scan TV 

iloesn'c have to be expensive anymore! 







£vefy dif^ nMfe huTL^ xe enhanciiig their c^imintEnkaiioD by ifsinf 
*""ff^ Join the fun Mid jcx wfau you've bcea misAmg. 



Otife^ Cfll«r SSTV t» cEn Ji3ii iflEbnUile fritb 









TF SJ3*.^ 



rVOA 



in fit 



AlankitE Value Syi«im 
1 1 5 Stednun Sl f 7 
Qwlntiford, MA ! 024' f SZ3 
(509) 256 6907 



CtflCLE 3S1 ON REAt^ER SERVICE CARD 



64 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 




210 Utica Street Tonawanda, NfY 14150 (716) 692-5451 




POWER AMPS 
& PRE AMPS 

AM & FM 2.0 Mhz - 1.2 Ghz, 2.0 Mhz - 2.3 Ghz 

$75.00 to $450.00 

Special Power Amplifiers for "Rabbit" Linear 

ATV Transmitters - Transceivers - 
Down Converters 70 CM Up 

HTS Systems - ^'900 Mhs" 10-15 W. Output 

FM 

Bricks on Boards 2 Mtrs. through 12 Ghz 

Others products inc. ATV samplers 

Write or call for catalog 



CmCLE 339 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PCB / Schematic CAD - from $195 




EASY-PC - For single sided and 
multilayer boards to 1 T'x1 7". 
Phenomenally fast and easy to use. 
Over 16,000 copies fen use worldwide. 
EASY-PC Professional for boards up to 
32" X 32* at ,001" fesolution, 16 layers. 
Schematic capture and netlist extraction - 
integrates seamlessly with PULSAR and 
ANALYSER III. Runs 00 PC/XT/AT/ 
286/386/486 with EGA or VGA displays. 



Logic Simulation - from $195 



L .fa ■> ^ IKXt ■'■Ihlll HTil 



ffi — !^_-r - 

m ^ - 






PULSAR and PULSAR Professional - 
Full featured digital logic simulators. 
Allow you to test your designs quickly and 
inexpensively without the need for 
sohisticated test equipment. 
PULSAR can detect the equivalent of a 
picosecond glitch occurring once a weekl 
Runs on PC/XT/AT/ 286/386/486 with 
EGA or V<jA displays^ 



Analogue Simulation - from $195 






I ^ FH 4 C-rf I 



■^. A/- 



\ t 



\ ! / 



'■ J * 



ANALYSER 111 and ANALYSER III Pro. 

Powerful linear circuit simulators have full 
graphical output, handle R'sX*s,C's, Bipolar 
Transistors, FET's, Op-Amp's, Tapped 
Transformers and Transnnission Lines etc. 
Plots Input and Output Impedances, Gain, 
Phase and Group Delay. Covers 0.001 Hz to 
>10GH2, Runs on PC/XT/AT/286/386/486 
with EGA or VGA displays. 



For information write, fax or call: 

Number One Systems 

REF: 73, 1795 Granger Ave., Los Altos, CA34024 

(415)968 9306 

VISA and MasterCard welcome. 



CmCLE 1 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Updates 



Nutnber 2Q on your FeedtiaDk card 



PTT Control From Receiver 
Audio 

With regard to the above men- 
tioned article, which appeared in 
the January 1995 issue of 73 Am- 
ateur Radio Today, a correction 
has been pointed out by Ken 
N0ITL. The LED in the schematic 
was inadvertantly shown in re- 
verse. However, the LED is cor- 
rectly shown on the FAR Circutts 
printed circuit board and on the 



PCB artwork. The schematic ap- 
pears on page 32. Thanks to Ken 
for his sharp eyes. 

Also — do not substitute smali 
signal type diodes (914 or 4148 
types) for the specified 1N4001 
diodes. The small signaf type 
diodes have considerably lower 
conductivity threshold voltages 
than the iN400l types, and their 
use will cause the units to oper- 
ate improperly. 



Sell Your New & Used Gear in 

Barter 'n ' Buy 

Classified Ads Really Work! 

Call Joyce Bocash today at 
1-800-274-7373. 




AMATEUR TELEVISION 



GET THE ATV BUG "^^i^ 

>1 Watt pep 

Transceiver 
Only $499 

Made in USA 
Value + Quality 

from over 25years 
in ATV,.,W60RG 

Snow free line of sight DX is 90 miles - assuming 
14 dBd antennas at both ends. 10 Watts in this one 
box may be all you need for local simplex or repeater 
ATV. Use any home TV camera or camcorder by 
plugging the composite video and audio into the Iront 
phono jacks. Add 70cm antenna, coax, 13.8Vdc@ 
3 Amps, TV set and you're on the air - it's that easy! 

TC70-1 has adjustable 1 Watt p.e,p. with one xtal on 
439.25, 434.0 or 426.25 MHz & properly matches RF 
Concepts 4-110 or Mirage D1010N-ATV for 100 Watts, 
Hot GaAsfet downconverter varicap tunes whole 420-450 
MHz band to your TV ch3. 7.5x7.5x2.7" aluminum box. 

Transmitters sold only to Hc^^nsed amateurs, for legal purposes, 
verified in tine latest Caflbook or send copy of new license. 

Hams, call for our compfete 10 pg. ATV catalog 

including downconvertersjransmittersjinear amps, 
and antennas for the 400, 900 & 1200 MHz bands. 



(81 8) 447*4565 m-f 8am^:30pfii pst 

P.C. ELECTRONICS 

2522 PsjTSon Lane Arcadia CA 91007 



Visa, MC, UPS COD 

Toin(WBORG) 
Maryann (WB6YSS) 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 65 




Number 21 on your Feedback card 



MichaefBryce WB8VGE 
^25 Mayflower NW 
Massilton OH 44646 

There's been plenly of new projects 
to keep the soldering irons burning 
late at night. This month, we'll look at 
a very popular 40 meter irarsceiver by 
Dave Benson NINNG, This rig first 
appeared in The Quarterly, apd Dave 
has given the nod to reprint it here. I'm 
fKil going to go to deep into Ihe twws 
and whys of this rig, but rather take a 
took at putting rt together and putting rt 
on the air. 

Ongmaity designed for 20 meters. 
Ifie ng can be mc>d^f»ed lo work on 40 
and 30 niters as well. I just happen to 
enjoy 40 CW, so ihafs the band I 

choee. 

The rig uses a superhsi designed 
receiver for single signal reception. It 
IS not a direct conversion receiver. The 
transmitter is full QSK using electronic 
switching and no relays. The transmit- 
ter will produce about 15 to 2,0 watts 
out put, depending on supply voltage 
ar>d frequency. Transmitter conlrot is 
by a variable capacitor/tuned circuit 
VFO instead of the vaf actor scheme of 
Hie NofCal trar\scerver. 

The rig is made up of two small PC 
boards. One contains ihe receiver, 
while the other contains ttw transmit- 
ter/mixer and QSK components. The 
rig will drive a small speaker with 
enough volume to be useful in a small 
room. There's a sidetone that monitors 
your keying. 

I brought the rig In kit form from 
Dan's Small Parts, Write to Dan for 
more information about this projecl. 
You can get just the PC ixjard. the full 
kit, or specialized parts for the 
transceiver. (Dans Small Parts. 1935 
South 3rd West #1\ Missoula. MT 
S9801.) 

Dan uses a lol of surplus parts in 
Itiis kit. It takes a bit longer lo figure 
out the strange markings on some of 



Low Power Operation 



ttie parts, mostly Itw capacitors. Some 
of the parts won't fit the board as Ihey 
should. 1 tossed those guys in the junk 
box and used my own parts that did fit 
the board. 

Assembty 

Assembly is typical of a baggie of 
parts klL I decided to build this rig In a 
box bi^g enough to handle some extra 
goodies down the road. I have plans 
for a small 5- watt amplifier stage, an 
S- meter, and peftiaps a digital readout 
for the VFO The ultra -miniature sltiff- 
it-in-a-boK rage ts not going to happen 
this time. Tlie cabinet ls steel ar>d alu- 
minum, with a sub-chassis for added 
strength. In fact, this cabinet was 
made by the now defunct Dentron 
Electronics. This cabinet used to hold 
a small muftlband QRP rig called ihe 
Station One. It covered 80, 40 and 15 
meters, used a direct conversion re- 
ceiver and sported a digital readout. I 
had one of the few prototypes ever 
buitt and. like a dummy, sold it al a 
ham test years ago. 

As il worthed out. 1 was able to use 
many of the holes already punched in 




Phoio A My ¥€rsk}n of Dave's superhet 40 meter transcerver. The lack of (Ml CBii- 
bration means a digitai readbuf to be added iatm. 



ing on inskte the chassis, several alu- 
minum shields were installed One is 
placed between the transmitter and re* 
ceiver board while a second shields 
the 5-watt amplifier section. I plan to 
use some sort of digital readout. SO a 
third shield will be added to keep 
noise from the digital section out of Ihe 
reoefver. 

I added a small PC board to Ihe 



""Originaily designed for 20 meters, 

the rig can be rrtodified to work on 

40 and 30 meters as welL " 



the rear apron. These included the 
SO- 239 chassis mount and holes for 
1/4 key jack and headphones, Two 
smaller holes were put to use supply- 
ing power to the transceiver. In this 
case, five -way htrdir>g posts are used. 
They are not my connector of choice 
for power but why drill more holes? 
The rear apron ts l/B" tempered alu- 
minum. The front panel rs made of 
.062 aluminum. The t<^ and sub-chas- 
sis are made of o^ki rolled sleet. 

I use there's a kit of activity go- 



rear of the transceiver to drive the 
S-meter. It's an audio-derived circuit 
from one of Doug Def^aw's books, It 
drives a small edgewise 200 ^A meter 
It^s more beds and whistles than any- 
thing else, although it does make It 
easier to center a signal in the band- 
width of the receiver. I backlight the 
meter's lace (or that profess tonal look, 
using a grain of wheat tHJto- The buto 
also serves as a *power on' incficator* 

Since Ihrs hg uses a variable ca* 
paotor tor tuning Itie VFO, ttie capaci* 



tor mus! be mounted very carefully. 1 
used a small block of Teflon machined 
out to fit the oddly-placed front mount- 
ing holes, The variable capacitor from 
Dan's Small Parts has an internal 
vernier drive, That's one less piece of 
hardware that needs lo be installed. If 
you don't t^ve this type o^f capacitor, 
then youll need to add some sort of 
drive reduction gearing. The iunir>g ca- 
pacitor is driven directly from a strvgle 
knob without a coupler or additional 
reducers, 

A very common mistake made 
when wofl^ing with a VFO is using a 
small-gauge wire between the tuning 
capacitor and the rest of the VFO cir* 
cuit. As this wire moves around by 
movement of the rig, Ihe frequency 
changes. In my transceiver, I use a 
very short, very stiff piece of copper 
wire, it's a hunk of number i2-gauge 
wire from some Romex cable. Twisting 
of Ihe case does not produce any no- 
ticeable movement o^ the VFO, I also 
used a rather unusual method of seal- 
ing the VFO componenrs to ttie PC 
board. 

Stability of the VFO may be 
hnpaired by ttie physlcaf nKivemenfs 
of parts on the PC board, fstormally. a 





Phoio B. Inside the rig. The large open area wilt tiou$e the S-wau PA an^ the 
digital circuit for the disptay. 



PhQto C. The S- meter PC hoard is mouttted on the rear ot the rfg Notice the 
SO'239 antenna connector also on the rear apron. 



66 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



goQ6 glob o( coil dope is applied to 
the capacitor on the circuit board. 
Having fong run out of that stuff. I 
heated up the hoi glue gun and ap- 
plied a glob on the parts that needed 
it. So far so good. The heat from the 
glue did no! soem to hurt the parts, 
and they sure don't move around on 
ihe PC boardf 

To l<eep everything as secure as I 
could, I mounied all the PC boarcte 
wrth 3/B' long threaded n>etai stand - 
ofte. They keep ihe txiaids secure and 
provkte ample grounding. A heavy sol- 
der tinned copper braid conneds all of 
the circLiEt boards to a common 
ground. 

Changes io the CIrcurt 

I did do some minor changes to the 
basic dn^iL I added a brute force RF 
gam control between the receiver 
board and the OSK circuit on the 
transmitter board. Dave designed the 
rig wrthou! an AGC. so you must ride 
herd on the volume control, Under 
very strong signals, that's not enough 
to keep the receiver from overloading. 
The RF gain control tben works its 
magic* 

After assembling t1>e kft, I was un- 
abte to bnng the receiver to life Every- 



t/4" jack automaticalty dtsoonnecfs the 
internal speaker. 

The Transmitter 

I lound the transmitter the least 
troublesome to get running. With the 
power supply sitting at 13 volts, the lit- 
tle guy will do about 2 watts into a 50- 
ohm load. 

But, watch oul^ — you have Ihe two 
Iransfoimers used for mixing the VFO 
output !o the transmitter's osciltator. 
It's very easy to gel tf*e hvo transform- 
efs 10 peak at the wrong frequency, In 
my case, I easily produced several 
watts at 8 MHz instead of 7 MH?- 

Only after looKJng at the output with 
a scope and frequency counter did I 
see the trouble. A retuning of the two 
stages put the nrg righi on the desired 
output, 

I never did tike using fK>niemade di- 
als for my rigs; I plan on using the F^- 
1 courrter from S & S Errgineering to 
display the Oji^erating frequency. An 
RCA-type jack installed on the rear 
apron brings the output of the VFO to 
the counter. I plan to add the counter 
internal to the rig laier on. By reading 
the VFO's frequency. Tit have a poor 
man's version o( digital readout. 

Adding an RIT is possible, but atas. 



"/ plan on working Field Day 
using this rig. 
I'll let you know how I make out 



n 



Mig seemed !0 worit, but I could not 
hear anyttung at ait. After a few calls 
to Dave, some heavy-duty trou- 
bleshooting and a t>it of luck, Hound 
the trouble. In the first stage, two 
tuned stages in the front end, there 
are two 47 pF capacitors used to bring 
the two coils to resonance. In my kit. 
Ihe capacitors supplied were 470 pF, 
Equally useful, but hardJy inierchange- 
able. Alter working on the front end, t 
found 66 pF worked as well as the 47 
pF capacrtors. Now that the front end 
was tuned, signals could be heard, but 
they weren't very loud, 

Ttiis trouble was traced to a 
misplaced resistor between the BFO 
and the audio amplifier switch. The 
MOSFET audio switch was never 
lurned completely on. yearly reducing 
Itie gain of the receiver. Ctieck these 
Iwo areas if your transceiver refuses 
10 come. to life. Just to be sure. I re- 
placed the MPF-102 MOSFET with a 
prime component Instead of a surplus 
device. 

Audio can be enhanced with this rig 
by enclosing Ihe speaker In some sort 
ol cabinet. I used a plastic top from a 
spray paint can to form a seal against 
the bad< of the speaker. Its amazing 
how much tjetler Ihe audio sounds af- 
ter such a simple fix. The plastic top ts 
held In place with a couple of globs of 
hot melt glue. I use a two-prong plug 
and jack so I can disconnect the 
speaker from ihe rig if need te. When 
using headphones, an open circuit 



I've not atten^ted^ it. If you want com- 
plete details on adding RIT lo this 
transceiver, send me three lirst-ctass 
stamps and rit send you several 
sheets of modifications, and of course 
the RIT circuit. 

The RIT comes from Roy Gregeson 
W6EMT, who also made several 
changes to the basic circuit. Perhaps 
the most important one is changing 
the configuration of tt>e 1350 IF ampli- 
fier. It's too invohmtf to present here, 
but rit include it with the RIT modMica- 
lion. Basically, ii requires cutting sev- 
eral traces around the 1350 and 
adding some components. The result 
is supposed to be astounding, I did 
this modification early on, and found 
the 1350 went into oscillation a I the 
blink of an eye This is caused by too 
much gain in the IF stage. But, make a 
note that I did tfie modffication tjefore I 
found the trouble with the front end 
tuned circuits. 

This is an enjoyable project, but it's 
not for the first-time builder, The in- 
structions from Dan's Small Parts are 
very limited, but not as bad as a 
Kanga kit. You should have burned 
up several soldering in^n tips before 
taking on tfiJs project- 
When you're done, however, you H 
have a real smooth operating 
ORP transceiver on your hands. I reaf- 
ly enjoy making QSOs with this 
transceiver, t plan on working Field 
Day using this rig. I'll let you know how 
I make out 



THE DC POWER 

BEHIND VOUR SIGNAL 

IS TRIPP LITE. 



PR Series DC Power Supplies 



Pertarimance ihit 
misses i oear 

7J Magazine 




Your performance depends on ours. Tripp Lite's 
PR Series DC power supplies are designed for 
years of reliable service and superior performance. 
They power praclically everything in your ham 
shack, including low band rigs. 2 meter, UHF and 
microwave radios. Best of alU they're economi- 
cally priced for your best value. 



PR series DC Power 
Supplies Feature: 



Great looki^ and a small spact;* 

saving footpriDt 

Crowbar overvohage protection 

Current- Jifniting electronic 

foldback for automatic 

o verc u rre nt pro I e c 1 1 on 

Solid state, integrated circuitry 

for excellent regulation of 

output vollage 

Regulated output voltage to 

mainiam 95% of no load value 

Higti quality filtering for very 

low ripple/low noise operation 

Heavy duly transformer for 

complete isolation from noise on 

incoming AC power 



18 m ad If Is aviiiEable 
frum 3 tu 60 amps 
(iticludicif^ HEW 12, 
20, 30 mid 50 amp 
mcMielii) in 120 
juid 22 0/140 voH 
connguration^r 
Rackmotint models 
avaiUblf .Tripp Lite 
also manufiictureK a 
complete line of 
power protection 
iz^luding the world 
famous iNOliap 
surgif suppressor. 





TRIPP LITE 

THE ROWSi PEOPL£ 



500 H. Orleans 
Chicago IL 606t0 
Tel: 312/755-8741 
Fax: 31Z^&44 6505 
Faxt>aclt: 312^755-5420 



sample a unit todaui Call and asH tor Depanmeni hmi. 




CIRCLE 2S5 ON READER SERVICE CAflD 

73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 S7 



Rhy loop 



Number 22 on your Feedback card 



h^rc L Lesvey. M.D.. WA3AJR 
6 Jenny Lane 
BaittmoreMD2t208 

New Software 

One of the frequent foci of tliis col- 
umn is sofiware available for the ama* 
teur desiring to run one of the d^ital 
modes— ihat is, F1TTY, AMTOR. pack- 
ets or tfie like — wilfi a computer. This 
may, or may not. include one of the 
popular multimode oontroit#rs as welL 

I received an E-mail message a d»t 
ago. which took me to task. Jim Jafte 
WA2V0S wrote, m part: 

*1 am farHy active on RTTY 
(PACTOR^ and have been using this 
mode since iate 1976 When my CP-1 
conked out back m 19S9 I went to a 
PK-232. and with the Apple tie com* 
puter suddenly found tfial I was out of 
luck with AMTOR, as there was no 
software out there to support the Ap- 
ple and this new mo0e! As luck would 
have rt. I got my hands on a PC, and 
someone gave me (copies of existing 
programs, which did rioi satisfy him). 

"During I hat lime a new face ap- 
peared on the Ham Horizon, namety 
Gary Johnson KF7XR who is the au* 
thor ot XP WARES and who has writ- 
ten supporting software for all the 
TNCs on the market, including the 
Gennan PTC units. So now we have a 
program (hat fully supports the ANSI 
color commands, contains a full-blown 
stand -a tone log book, and suppod tor 
(several brands of amateur radio di- 
rectories). No 1 only did Gary write soft* 
ware and re-write it over and over 
again to rid it of those nasty critters we 
cafi bugs, but he also maintains a BBS 
and an FTP site on the Internet so that 
I can download atl the latest wares for 
distribution as weJI as our overseas 
fellow hams who have internet access 
as well, Gary responds to mail, re- 
quests complaints, critiques and 
sometimes Instantarfeously re- writes 
software to accommodate our needs, I 
have made well over 4.800 contacts 
using my PK-232 since 1990, when I 
began keeping the electronic tog. As 
far as I know. Gary's software is the 
only one that offers a tog conversion 



Amateur Radio Teletype 



program that successlully converts 
any electronic log book to his lodging 
format. His program operates in the 
Host mode, which tothers) do noV 

Somewhat stung, 1 surfed onto the 
Intemei. using my handy-dandy AOL 
interface, and dropped Gary a note. 
His response was: 

**! have no problem at all with you 
revfewing the software or adding it to 
ihe disk collection. There are several 
pfograms on the FTP site for ftie KAM, 
AEA and PTC type controllers. All pro- 
grams have the same basic features, 
just optimized for the different con- 
troiers. There is also an eittemal log- 
ging program that interfaces to the 
software- It is Gaiecl XPLOG, Several 
of ihe menu optjons in the MISC menu 
are tied to ihe external logger 73, 
GaryKFTXP' 

Mow tfiat I have whetted your ap- 
petite. Jet me tell you abojt these pro- 
grams. As Gary said, tfiere are several 
•Havors" of XPCOM. They all include, 
though, the following features: 

• Pull-dovvn menus, 

• Custom operation wHh the AEA 
PK^232, KAM. MFJ-1278 and PTC, 

• Mouse compatibility, 

• One- key brag file and text operation, 

• External interfacing to the user's fa- 
vorite text editor 

• Offers full PACKET, AMTOR, FEC, 
PACTOR. BAUDOT, GTOR, TOR. 
GTOR Monitor and CW modes, {TOR, 
GMQN and GTOR in XPKAM only.) 

» Full use of the HOST mode for the 
AEA PK-232 and KAM. Pseudo- 
Kost Mode operation for PTC con- 
trollers. 

• SimplKied command structure for the 
MFJ-127a, 

• Intuitive on-line help system. 

• Ouici<- Connect feature for packet 

• Real time and background printer 
support. 

• Built-in logging, with auto search. 

• Macro support. TYPEOVER IVIacros, 
allows you to insert text macros into 
ANSI files without destroying the pic- 
ture, 

• Mutti- Window ANSI color support for 
GTOR, FACTOR, packet and ASCII. 
(VTIOOemuEation.) 



* Radio interface for most transceivers 
that support computer control. 

• Direct Buckmaster, SAMS and QRZ! 
CaitDook interlace - 

Now. as to the varieties. XPCOM 
Version t.55 supports AEA {Host 
Mode) and MFj-1278 controllers, in- 
cluding dual TNC Support. XPDUAL 
supports AEA (Host Mode) PK-900 
and DSP 2232 controllers. XPKAM 
supports Kan Ironies KAM and KAM+, 
including GTOR and FACTOR, and 
built-in GTOR Monitoring without the 
need for external prograrfis! TTie AEA 
and Kantron^cs versions also support 
muftt-connect operation with XP Win- 
dows, and multiple ASCII fi^ transfer 
in packet mode. And. fmaiiy. XPPTC is 
available for Ihe Paccomm PTC and 
SCS FACTOR controllers. 

Each of these programs is supplted 
separately, as shareware, with a S3 9 
registration. 

As Jim and Gary indicated, there es 
also an external loggmg program. 
XPLOG Briefly, this is a versatile log- 
ging program that can operate as a 
stand ■ak>ne program or from XPCOM, 
Including name-'QTH browsfng. anten- 
na heading assistance, and more. To- 
gettter. this ts one complete package. 

Jus) to put any other questions io 
rest, these programs should run on at- 
fiTOSt any PC-compaiible system, re- 
quiring any of the B088/&6/286/ 
386/466 series. 51 2K memory (640K 
fecommendedj, a monochrome. CGA, 
EGA. or VGA display, and an optional 
Microsoft -compatible mouse. Multi- 
mode controllers supported include 
the AEA PK-232 or MFJ-1278 for XP- 
COM, the AEA PK-900 or DSP^2232 
for XPDUAL. the Kantronfcs KAM or 
KAM -plus version 6.0 or laier firmware 
for XPKAM. and SCS or Paccomm 
PTC controller with version 2,00 or lat- 
er firmware for XPPTC. 

There are at feast two ways to ob- 
tain this software, presuming you do 
not have a buddy with the disk, or 
have the material on a local BBS. You 
can log onto Internet, at ftp. 
indirect. com. under the /pub/soft- 
ware/hamradio/Kpware directory, and 
download the material directly. Alter- 
nately, you can send for the latest ad- 
ditions to the "RTTY Loop" Disk Cot- 
ieclion, disi^s 9, 10, and 11. which con- 
tain all the programs and documenta- 
tion discussed above 

Compasltlon Software Question 
Just 10 change Ehe subject, how 



about a question to you ali? This from 
Rfchard, WA1SKQ. who writes, via 
AOL: 

"Just a quick question, perhaps you 
can help steer me in the correct direc- 
tion. I've been running FACTOR for 
quite some time, and during Ihe past 
year. I have been using a FK-SOO mn- 
ning off a 486DX and PcPakrait lor 
WINDOWS. Ali nice stuff, and no com- 
plaints. With the 900 ard other TNCs 
coming on line. m<?re and more folks 
are transmitting graphics . . . great 
stuff to copy, but a bear to create. I'm 
finding plenty of ANSI files on a variety 
of on-line services, many on AOL. but 
have more interest in composing my 
own. A ham friend sent me a program 
called THEDRAW. He had billed it as 
capable, but not user friendly. ar>d Tm 
forced to agree. Though I can gener- 
ate some interesting color graphk^s for 
use in AMTOR. it's a real chore. Is this 
Ifie way ol ANSI gi^phics. or is there 
some software out there that makes 
composition a bit less of a chore? 
Thanks for your f>eip, and keep 14} the 
good work.' 

Well. Richard, I was going to sug* 
gesl THEDRAW myself, as I Started to 
read your letter. I use ihai program to 
create ASCII/ANSI screens lor my 
medical software. I will leave rt open to 
the reattefs. though, to suggest more 
"user-friendly^ sofiware. I just happen 
to hke THEDRAW 

For those who may have come 
in late, any or all of the disks in the 
^'RTTY Loop" Software Collection re- 
main available. To obtain a lisi ol pro- 
grams, just drop me a self -addressed 
stamped envelope to the address a1 
the top of this column, or send E-matl 
to one of the addresses below, and ni 
send along the list forthwith. Each disk 
in the series can be yours by sending 
a 3.5'' high density disk. $2 in US 
funds per disk, and a self- ad dressed 
mailer with sufficient postage to me, 
along with a note telling me which 
collection you would like. 

Of course, I always welcome 
comments or questions. Those vital 
E-mail addresses are; CompuServe 
75036,2501; Delphi MarcWA3AJR: 
America Online MarcWASAJR; 
Internet MarcWA3AJR@aorcom. 
Such a comment turned me onto the 
software highlighted this month Who 
knows where your question will send 
me? I took fom^ard to it. just as you 
look forward to next month's "RTTY 
Loopl 



MORSE CODE MUSK! 



SENSATIONAL NEW WAY TO LEARN 
CODE — Do Aerobics, Sing, Jog, or Drive 
while learning code! A fun & easy way to 
learn or retain Morsa Code skills^ Now the 
secret is yours with this amazing syncrontzed 
tweakth rough* Great fun tape for ali licenses 
and classrooms! Order: 

"THE RHYTHM OF THE CODE" 

Version 2 cassette today! 

Send $9.95 and induds SSW SH to: 

KAWA RECORDS 

P.O, Box319-ST 
Weymouth, MA02iaS 

or fnofiey oilier oNy We sf^ al ordef^ m0wi 5 c&ys 



4^i^ 



LOGic 4 

TNEftHAMEtAOfD 
SOFTWftBE SYSTEM 



pfeis logmngp oflJ^r.^ awards Iractong tor a/ny 
award, OSL man^gefr^ent facility. rad*o intertac- 
^, arrtenna rotor cantrotp ifata terminal tor ail 
c^tal madm, i^neqiaied padcet spotting* eon* 
tesftfig. CW keyei, sound card suppoii OJS- 
ic^nizab^ screen w\6 repofts, supeib doetxn&n- 
tatJc^ and Siippoit grayifne propagati&n c^art. 
M^i^fmse to callbook ^tabes^. and much mora. 
Specs: IBM 366SX^ 4^ RAM, hard driva. LOG- 
IC 4 DOS f79, Windows S&9. LOGic Jr DOS $35, 
Windows 549. Foreign ahrrLajl S10. visa^mc. Fm 
tttop^kl Also avsllat^: PDA OSL t^oula Lift, 
r&dto Inidrface harcfwuv, k^y^r Irtt^rfic* 



Fb. 4O4-S42-0M7. Rb 4M-44f-ase7 Tiefi 
wim. 4D4<417-t»91 M U-Tl, »Mm FfL 



IVindoHs 
or 
DOS' ^ 



^ RC-1000 

Computer REPEATER 

Concepts CONTROLLER 



Autopatch* Reverse Autopatch 
• User Prograniinable CW ID, 
Control & User Codes & Timeouts 

Manual with schematics • SOOay Warrafity 

Wired & Tested w/ manual ,„, $239.95 

Micro Computer Concepts 

BS49 Gum Tree Ave. 

New Port Richey. FL 34653 

81 3-376-6575 



VJSA 



QRCL& 2 ON READER SERVICE CAfID 



CIRCLE 160 OM READER SERVICE CARD 



68 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



1 



J-Pole in your Pocket? 

Tough dual-band antenna for the travelin ' man or the condo dweller. 
Hang-anywhere style and extra range can save life in an emergency. 



\ 



JamesH. Gray WIXU 

During my years of traveling around the 

eastern United States on business or vacation, I 
often wished I had a stnall, inexpensive and 
easy-to-use antenna to match my little hand- 
held 2 meter radio. Occasionally I had an HF 
rig in the car, but more often it was the little 2 
meter radio which was useful and fun- On long 
road trips it alleviated boredom, kept me awake 
and almost always assisted me to find a motel, 
restaurant, or other ham's QTH. On such trips 
the mobile antenna was fine until I needed 
more range from the motel 

When I traveled by plane, the rig was the 
handheld with no amplifier. It 
had only a smaU telescoping 
whip thai I could extend to about 
19 inches. If I happened to be 
close enough to a repeater in a 
large city, thai was fme and I 
managed to "work'' the locals in 
spite of low power and a minimal 
antenna. 

But there were occasions 
when there was no local repeater, 
or when I was inside a steel-and-concrete build- 
ing. At such times I wasn*t able to make any 
contacts at all and had lo reson to dull tedious 
television programs before going to bed. 

If you face similar problems when traveling 
light and by air, you know how it feels lo be 
alone among the many. 

The Pico Sohitifrai 

Today, the travelin' man has a ready solu- 
tion to the problem: a neat antenna produced by 



PASS THIS TEST! 

WIN*5 

Clip this ad and circle the 
TigerTail™. Send it with 
your order to get $5 off 
any purchase. 



Can You Find 
theTiger'sTai I? 




tf your eyes are sharp you can spot 
the TigerTair^ in the photo above. If s 
not attached to something that bites; in- 
stead it puts extra growi into the signal 
from the HT if s attached to. 

TigerTail™ improves SWR, lowers 
radiation angle, and extends range. 
You can use low power and save your 
battery pack, but still have a big signal 

Better than an amplifier, it improves 
reception too. TrgerTair" does all this 
by simply slipping under your flex an- 
tenna and just hanging down — without 
sticking up or out or getting in the way. 



Antennas West and called the *'PicO'J." It 
meets all the requirements set forth in the 
first sentence. Pico means "small/* as in 
"picofarad/' and '*J" stands for **J-pole " 
the well-known low-angle, omnidirec- 
tional vertically polarized antenna— just 
what*s needed for 2 meters. 

Antennas West^s Pico- J offers some 
features not found in the usual J-pole. For 
example, the fecdpoint is already found 
and matched for you, and the antenna is 
small and light — so much so that it can be 
rolled up and slipped into a small eye- 
glasses case. It looks like 
a sleek black ribbon 55 
inches long. A six-foot 
small-diameter coax 
feedline comes off the 
boitom. Us gold- pin 
BNC attaches dirccdy to 
your radio. 

A small loop at the 
top may be slipped over 
a curtain rod or a nail or 
any other suitable projection. But. if by 
chance you don't happen to find a suitable 
suppon, Antennas West thoughtfully provides a 
small suction cup with an embedded hook that 
can be slapped up on a window or any smooth 
surface* and presto! — you're on the air! 

Pico-J is completely weather-sealed and 
could be hung outdoors if you wish. Otherwise, 
you can hang it in a closet or a doorw ay: in fact, 
anywhere that is convenient and where your sig- 
nal won't be blocked. The extra reach provided 
by this beauty could save life in an emergency, 
and is always useful when just plain chauing 
with the locals. 

Your Pico-J stretches range, improves re- 
ception, reaches far-away repeaters, and saves 
your battery pack. 

The measured VWSR is less than 2: 1 be- 
tween 142 and 150 MHz— ideal for CAP. 
MARS, and other services near the 2 meter 
band — and is a very beautiful 1 : 1 at 146 MHz. 
Not bad, eh? 

Best of ai!, considering the benefits, is the 
price: $19.95 for the 2 meter modeK S26 for the 
2m/70cm dual bander, both complete with the 
soft vinyl case to store your Pico-J when it's not 
in use. 

On a recent trip I tucked Pico-J into my 
briefcase, right next to the handheld. No, I 
didn't even use the **duckie" or the telescoping 
whip because I had all i needed in diis one neat 
antenna. Maybe you'll find the same. 




-condensed from RadioFun 



ii 



No Antennas Allowed? 

Who will see Pica-J hanging 
in your closet or on she balcony? 
But your signal will be heard. 
Pica^J's half wave radiator is 
sleek and unobtrusive, his thin 
flexible feedline is barely 
noticeable. When his work is 
done Pico-J rolls up and slides 
into his pouch like the Genie 
slipping back into the bottle. 

Carry PicO'J on hikes or trips 
as you would carry a pair of 
glasses* Keep him in your 
emergency jumpkit. When you 
need gain and low angle omni- 
directional coverage pull out 
Pica* J and be full quieting when 
it counts. 

New Pico-J 's for 1995 
PJ Packet S22 — Maximum efficiency 
on 2m packet frequencies, 

PJ 220 $ 19.95— Go everywhere gain 

for the ** private " band. 
Pilot's Pico-J $39 — Aviation band 

range booster for pilots on the go. 



F 



5/95 



[ |Yes^ I want to increase range and save my batteriesl 

_Send my Pico-J. 2m or 220=519.95, Packet=$22, Dual=S26, Pitoi=$39. 

Send my TigerTail. (1 for S7.95, 2 for S 15, 3 for $21. Specify band) 

Send a combo (PJ + TT). (Just add $5 lo your Pico-J order)Ali prices ppd. 

riYes, I circled the TigerTail! Knock $5 off my order. 

Name 

CaU 



I 



Phone 



Street 
City. ' 



State 



Antennas West 



L 



Box 50062-S Provo UT 84605 



InfoPak 
$1 



I 
I 
I 
I 

J 

CIRCLE 51 ON READiR SERVICE CARD 



Unit 



Zip. 



fefe 800 926 7373 



Ask kaboom 



Number 23 ort your Feedback card 



MichaetJ. GemrKBlUM 
c/o 73 Magazine 
70 Route 202 North 
Peterbofough NH 03458 

Mail Call! 

I have just returned from a trip to 
China, Hong Kong and Hawaii. I didn't 
get to do any hammtng in China, and, 
as far as ( could tell, the whole subject 
was one not very lamiNar to rhe aver- 
age Chinese. (Tfien again. Itie aver- 
age Amencan these days is in pretty 
much, the same boat) In Hong Kong, I 
visited uncountable numbers of elec- 
tronics shops— there are at least two 
on every street in Kowloon. Its Ka- 
boom heaven. They're very much like 
the ones in New York, though, in Ihal 
Ihey make the prices up. snd I do 
mean up. These, however, expect you 
to bargain. Many prices were much 
higher than here In the Slates, but 
some were lower. Tlie most interesting 
aspect of those stores was Ihat just 
about every one of them had ham 
gear In the window! I saw lots of Icom 
HTs, many Standards and a few Ken- 
woods. No Yaesu sluff at alL 1 even 
saw a few Icom HF rigs, along with 
antenna tuners and hlgh-currenr DC 
power supplies. C^n tiam radio be thai 
b«g over there? I don t thmk so. In (act 
I never saw any menlion thai this 
equipment was for amateur radio. The 
HTs were billed as VHF and UHF. usu- 
ally with no description of frequency. 
Most of the VHF sets were on 2 me- 
ters, but some were not, and I have no 
Idea what frequencies the UHF gear 
was on. There were signs Ifi several 
ships warning that use of the radios 
was illegal in Hong Kong, which sug- 
gested to me that, once the buyer left 
the area, he was pretty much on hts 
own. In other words. I think people in 
Asia buy these things and jusi use 
them. wiltTOUl benefit of license, 

Before you go salivating over the 
ktea of getting great d^is on HTs via 
mail-order, I fnust tell you Ihat the 
prices were higfier than they are here. 
Oh well. By the way, thai cute little 
Standard 2 meter HT that runs on two 
AA cells was available in UHF over 
there, so I wouldn t be surprised to 



Your Tech Answer Man 



see a 440 vdfskin here one oi th^e 
days. 

I trad the use of a dualbander HT in 
Hawaii, and I tried to use il to say a 
tew alohas to the local hams. I me^ 
with tittle success. I heard QSOs, and 
I put out a number of 'listenings," but I 
managed to engage m oniy one con- 
versation, and that one was a round 
tabie which never got bacit around to 
me. I was bringing up repealers just 
fine, but *t seemed that nobody want- 
ed to talk I don't want to go and im- 
pugn Hawaiian hams, though, so 111 
just assume my signal wasn't strong 
enough or something. Hawaii was one 
of the most beautiful places I've ever 
seen, arxl the people 1 met were ex* 
tremely friendly, so I hope 10 go hack 
and try some more flamming one of 
these days. V\l lei you know more 
when I gel there! 

Piling Up 

While I was away, some mall start- 
ed piling up, so I thought I'd take this 
opportunity to answer a few letters. 
Here goes: 

Dear Kaboom, 

Recently, my Kenwood TS-450S 
has developed an RF-iike hum duhng 
CW transmit. All my antennas and 
ground syslem seem fine. The only re- 
maining suspect componems are my 
Astron RS-35M power supply and the 
transceiver iiseff. The radio appears to 
be operating hr>e on receivet and tune- 
up into the dummy load appears nor- 
mal except for the appearance of the 
hum and a siight oscillation which 
shows up on the digitai metering. Prior 
to this probiem, the power supply had 
gor^e into crowbar protection mode be- 
fore resetting after shutdown and 
restart. Any ideas? 

Hum m in' the AC Tune 

Dear Kummtn', 

I think you hil the nail on ttie head 
with your last due. Why did ttie supply 
go into crowbar protection? Tt>e usual 
reason is too much voltage at I he out- 
put. It sounds very much like you have 
a shorted regulator transistor in the 



power supply. Measure the voltage 
whiie the rig is in receive: your rig 
should be drawing about one amp, 
which should keep ttie power supply in 
proper regulation. \i your measure- 
ment exceeds the supply s raitngs by 
much, and I suspect it wilL there's 
your answer. Also, if you have a 
scope, check the DC line with the 
scc^5e set 1o AC coupling and the sen- 
sltivrty high 11 you have more than the 
rated 60-Hz ripple, that's another clue 
your regulator Is gone. 

Dear Kaboom^ 

I have noticed that both of my HF 
rigs, which come from different manu- 
facturers, throw a large RF pulse out 
the antenna jack on initial keydown. I 
can see it on meters aixt on my oscil- 
kiscoQG. My coTKem is how it may af- 
fect my Ameriiron AL-SOB amplitter 
and other equipment- The amp's man- 
ual expressly describes this phe- 
nomenon, and warrts not to underload 
the amp to reduce power, as this couid 
cause extremely high energy levels in 
the plate and grid circuits. 

This worries me. as it causes out- 
put pulses measurable at over 1^5 kW 
PEP. and the amp is only rated at 1 
kw. The ptiise remains even if I have 
ttie amp set at much less than maxi- 
mum rated output power, forcing mo- 
mentary illegal operation. Plus, il ex- 
ceeds some o( my equipment's power 
ratings. Is there any solution to this 
mess? 

Zap 

DiearZap, 

This is a lough one. The RF final 
amp stages in HF rigs use negative 
feedback to control themselves. 
They're just like the ALC loops used 
with external amps, only these are in- 
ternal to the radios. In order for them 
to control anything ^ the negative feed- 
back loops must have something to 
control! In other words, the output 
must go high enough to lei the ALC 
build up Its voltage and squeeze it 
back down. In the audio world, the 
time lag between cause and effect re- 
sults in something called TIM. or tran- 
sient inlermoduiatkjn distortion. In ef- 
fect its just what you're describing: a 
huge overshoot tjetore Hie circuit acts. 
For thai reason, most high-grade au- 
dio gear uses liute or no negative 
feedback. Unfortunately. There s no 
easy way out of this problem in the RF 



worid. Most htams probably just ignore 
il but. you're right, it does lead to quick 
bits of excessive and illegal power. AH 
the amp manufacturer seems to be 
saying is to let it htappen, because !ry- 
irig to prevent il by underloading the 
amp will cause ail that tripul power lo 
damage the amp's grid cirojits, t seii- 
ously doubl that the momentary puis- 
es will damage anything else, simply 
because they're so short But they are 
technically illegal, and I applaud you 
for caring. Still, I have no answer for 
how to prevent It, except perhaps to 
use an attenuator between the radio 
and the amp. Naturally, you'll need a 
big one that can handle your rigs' out- 
put power, and it sure will limit your to- 
tal output, trs an ugly sofution at best. 
If any reader has a real solution, 
please let me know and 1 1I tje glad to 
send il along. By the way. I've seen 
this problem too, and it once caused 
some trouble for me. I never did st^ve 
It. 

Dear Kaboom, 

I'm an electronics experimenter 
who frequently uses ^unk box'' parts. 
In December's column, you started 
describing the Japanese formal for 
marking capacitors. I have lots of caps 
with such markings, and I need to con- 
vert the values into the American for- 
mal so I can use Ihem. Could you 
please explain the system? 

Signed^ 
Perplexed 

Dear Perplexed, 

Sure. Essentia Ity. all Japanese ca- 
pacitors are marked in picofarads, 
which is 10 to the -12 power The r*rst 
two numbers are the value, and the 
last is a multiplier, kind of similar to the 
system used with resistor color codes. 
For instance, a cap mar Iced 102 is 10 
with two ^eros, or 1000 pF. Now, 1000 
pF is the same as .001 ^F because 
1000 X 10 to the -12 equals 001 x 10 
to the -6. If all Ihat calculation is too 
annoying, just remember it this wayt 
105 is \ ^R 104 is ,1 \iE 103 is .01 ^iF, 
^02 is .001 ^F. and so on. So. a 152 
woukJ be -0015 ^F And, a 473 would 
be ,047 pF, If you make a lltde chart, 
you'll never have iroiibia wtlh this. 

Well, i think Ihat about does it for 
th»s n)onth. Next time we'tl gel into a 
new topic and answer a few more 
letters. Until then, 73 and aloha de 
K81UM I sure do miss those pa- 
payas! 



Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in 73 Amateur Radio Today I 



f 



C. W. WOLFE COMMUNICATIONS 




BUY SELL TRADE 

All Brands ol 2 Way Radios 
p- and Equipment ^ 



1113 CentraJ. Billings, MT 59102 

406-252-9220 Fax: 40e<252-$S17 

C^t or wnt0 for Citrreoi fiyet 






HI-PERFORMANCE DIPOLES 



^-J_ 



~J. -. 



j„jF I'vjj: 







SS£)-5^ K «& »L IS. Hll 42 *Sf^... tHAfiO &3brq ^ 

Tiptesc Banc±L *«% 'TfiH Um Up flwuji Tc^ui SAH^ir 



|i1«LIB 



:SKS*5£ ^ta^tq[ia*»d»dl«i.fepe^ a irK^m 



W9INN AfflENNAS 

Bcix 393 Mt l^rDftp«t IL 600S6 708-394-3414 



UHF REPEATER 



Make high qualify UHF repeaters from 
GE Master II mobilesl 



«40WatrMoiii«-Ridb 

■ DypJexif>g aixa tuntng inf^jrmailion 

• IfiDrmaiky) wiawut radio 



ST 99 
$t2 
540 



CIRCLE 20 ON REJ\BEf4 SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE ^ ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



Versatel Communfcatfons 

Or<Jers 1-800-^ 5 6-5 548 For <nio, 307'a66-l700 

P.O. Box 4012 • Casper. Wyoming 82604 



CJRCLE 259 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



70 73 Amateur Radio Today *Ua)i,^ms 




CABLE X-PERTS, INC. 



COAX (LOW LOSS GROUP) 1 OOFTAJ PSOOFT 



' i?ee us St 

Dayton 

Booths 

t75-1S7 



nSStr »13 FOtl +^6\ aRMC £ 7 £ « 400 Wc 



HCi ^i\etraw POL ««s%BRM) is« « 4a»iiit. 

Un no Oa SHU) HA JACKET I7aet46<iftfe 



.45/FT 
Oft 



SSFT 
4lffT 



IJin gOQ DQi SaO [IU JACltET 1 TOdB 4 4S!1IHl. 



iun 1?0(} PBl SHLO blA MC9(£T[»SdKe 1 46QUHL. 



L47]Fr liSFT 

4.asifT Assm 
4.aiFT tMin 



COAX (HF GROUP) 

no 213AJ MIL-SPEC DIRECT BURJAL JACKET 1 fldQ « SQWhz 

RQMJ FOAM BS% flTO UV RESISTANT iACKET 1 5dB « SOMHz 
lid WNI fiXfiSl; BRP BiK, SILVER, w CLEAfl UV RES JKT ..^„ 
Ki214/U{2| SiLVEfl BFUUJD SHIELDS Mll-SPEC..^.^ 



ROaOlil DBL SILVER SHLDTERDtf 25gOQQ W, tOUHt. 

tet4a^ D£l SLVER SHLDTEfUSIir - 

JIQ|MJ9S\aRAi} 

RGSIMJJ^TCBflM} 

«SDOWLMI£nLfe ^^ 



32/FT 
. .l7fT 



«S0 (Ml UUIOER UC lf)GA SinrWDB] ^ 



,3*F 

le/FT 

IS&'FT 
STSFT 
iJOiyFT 

1&FT 
TftFT 



ROTOR CABLE 

5971 iCOlO (»aeS} Ir B» tfi b T25i sue WRSJ^_ ^aH 3kfT 

i4naccM){srue^«)brnMi4>t>majC4ivRSjcr_ af? wft 

ttOATIftG) COPPER iCCtHAyPVCiMSCET . 20FT JMFi 

IIGAT1M«D COPPER iCGRA¥PVCKWier_ ffiFl JBTT 

HO* TIWCD COPPER 7C QHA¥ PVC JACKET^™^—^^ i*FT ^4*7 

ANTENNA WIRi 

14GA \m STfl ■SyPERFlfX' UNI^(SMlATE& . 
14QA 7;2211AR0 ORAVW BC UNINSUUTID. 
14QA BOLtD tOPf=^W|LD- UNINSULATED.. 
143 A SOUD "BfiRE COPPERT UWNSlJLATED.. 
1 2aA 1 B^ "BAIRE COfPE^T UNINSULATED . ,. 



■irliriBRilBBiiBrii 



iMAaa;» "baae coppiejt pvc imsijlateo ,.„, 

l4aA 4U3(! "BAHE OOPPtfl' PVC tNSUUTEO .^ 

noA tea) "BAnE coppEir pvc insulatio 

DACflONnCiPEDBLBFt)3nfi770iTtSt 

BALUNS 

VQAin taR41 1J-ttUHZTf|AliirOnMi'lTY^„, 
INfiDU tn »n l»2 OfiRT TWE fMPOa C3R QEMI . 
WSUll>4-UK'^a«L»€*CumBnBMJUM 

waeiHcc 



._ la/FT ^*rr 

._. IQ^ QWFT 

.... 09/FT t>7;R 

.... .OS/FT ,07ffT 

,.,. IBFT 13ffT 

,.,. JiBFT .07ifT 

fiiFT joarr 

— .IWT ISFT 

_ laFT IttFT 

PRICE 



tllJSCA 



LAN CABLES 

AffiUAJ l>«iCT Fah.4^95*k BKM] {jAAY JACKfT - 



2«QA SOUD 4^'WlB/a 5* UN^10 GRAY 4ACM£r.. 



.MST^ JSn 



COAX W/SiLVER TEFLON PL259^s EA END 

IQOFT fia2 \m MIL-SPEC [WIECT OUfltAL JUT T SiB t SOUHz W OtWEA 

son RGSl artJ MfL- SPEC CMRECT 0Ufll Al JKT 1 .5« • MMHi OS MrEA 

rOOFT f^Ga^ FCIAM 95% SHD UV flESiSTANT JKTl 2iJB H SCMHz S40 QQi'EA 

50n RQB/L) FOAM e5%BR0llV RESISTANT J»ai£« » 50Wiii. .-.-.- S22.50,'EA 



AUTOMOTIVE "ZIP" CORD 

lOQA2C1=LBClBLPOlJUaASE^£SzrrA^T^^EDmJC-aP ^ 40*7 «fFr 
iaQAK-R£QBl£'aUaAS RESISTANT HE&aX-aP^^ fOFT ^FT 

OROUNOING BBAIO 

T'DWIQCQPPB^fiAAl ZSFfKaqa SCFTW.QG lOQFTSS&QE) tOMOER 
1.TTHKED COPPER BRAID afTJfJM SOFT 325.00 l(S<Fr$4A.Qa LfKSTHSTTO 

CONNECTORS 

PL 259 SILVEMS=L0WQQ1D Tip „„ IDPKStll.OO 2SPK&t2S.(» 

"N-CO^JNeCTORSILVeR^GOLOTIP T0P«S$325a KPKS^7S0O 



Pl^& 



VCo"**^''*** 






(»5SJ 



MORE PTEMS STOCKED CX 0t E J WIRE CUT TO YOUR SPtCtFfC LEt4QTHi 

ORDERS ONLY: 800-828-3340 c^ 

TECH INFO: 706-506-1866 FAX: 708-506-1970 M'^'^/i-w 
113 McHenry Rd., Suite 240. Buffalo Grow, IL 60089-1797 L-lJf;^^^ 








A NO-RADIAL VERTICAL 
THAT COVERS 80 OR 75 METERS? 

THERE'S ONE NOW! 

No, we won't insult your intelligence by telling you that it's a 
"halfwave'' or that ANY veftical will operate more efficiently without a 
good radial system than with one; it certainly won't! It you want 
expensive fairy tales talk to our competitors! If, however, you've no 
room for even the smallest radial system just install the most efficient 
multjband vertical in the business, the HF9V-X, over our counterpoise 
kit. You'll not only save a tidy sum but you'H work DX that the shorter 
and more lossy no-radtal "halfwaves" can't touch because t>oth the 
HF6V-X and HF9V*X use longer active element lengths for higher 
radiation resistance and greater efficiency on more bands than any of 
the so-called haffwaves. Ask for our free brochure for cx?mplete specs 
on alt Butternut models and receive technical note DLS-1 "Dirty Littte 
Secrets from the Antenna Designer's Notebook") that shows you how 
to calculate the probable efficiency of any vertical antenna using the 
manufacturer's own specs so you won't have to learn the tmth the 
hard way! 

Model HF9V-X (shown to the left) for 80/75, 40, 30, 20, 
17, 15, 12, 10 and 6 meters. 

Model CPX counterpoise kit for &utt#nitut models 
HF9V-X, HF6V, and HF6V'X; substitutes for ground or 
elevated radials. Self-supporting tubing bolts onto 
base of antenna. Mast not provided. 

BUHERNUT ELECTRONICS CO. 

P.O. Box 1234, Qlmito, TX 78575 (210) 350-5711 





^(Hil^iiSgmi;^ 



FAST SERVICE • DISCOUNT PRICES 



ELECTRET MIKE 



0.31" diameter X 0.325" 0.7^ 
long leads terminaled with two 
pin connector (O.T cantors) 

50 




CAT# 
MIKE'18 



$1 



dfich 



RECHARGEABLE 
2 Vdc 5 AH (USED) 



Gates -dyclon '" X Lead Aad 
Battery. Can be garbed for higtref 
oirTent of voltage, 1 ,735^ dia, X 
2.85' high. 0.25* quidk connect 
terminals. Removed from woilcfng 
equipment. CAT# LB-25U 



REFLECTIVE 
OPTO SENSOR 



SHARP #2L01 
0.75" mounting 
centers. 



75* 




CAT# OSR-9 



obau 



SURFACE MOUNT 
SPEAKERS 



These surface motini speaker's were designed 
far use wiih car stereo, but they will work as 
weil, or better as intercom of communicaJjons 
Speakers in your home or workshop. 4*. 

4 ohm. speakers mounted m an 
unbreakable black plastic, slant- 
faced enclosure. They are 
rated 5 watts. 
Enclosure 
measures 
4.32" X 
4.5^^ X 
2.45" h. 




Each pair is 
boxed and includes two 
shod pieces of f»ook-up wire 

CAT # SX-411 




75 



per pair 




OPTO SENSOR 



SHARP #eP1 152 

0-12- gap- CAT# OSU-23 



«< 



2 FOR $"1 



00 



ORDER TOLL FREE 



1-800-826-5432 

CHAHCE ORDEHS to VisBj Mastercard ar Discover 



TERMS Mjnimurn ondor $10.0D. Shipping and h«indl«rig for the 
4B dohline^ial USA £4 00 per oider All others iticludlng AK, 
Hi, PR or Canada must pay fuH pipping. AJI orcSers ctebvefed 
in CAUR^RNIA musi inciuoe \oc^ srale sales t<u. Ouantilies 
LtfTuted NO ODD Pnces subjedl ia change wnhout nofee. 



CALL. WBITE or 
FAX for a ^^^^ 

54 Page 
CATALOG 

Omside me U.SA 
g^j^ $2,00 pcstafe 



MAIL ORDERS TO: 
ALL ELECTRONICS 

CORPORATION 

P.O. Box 567 

Van Nuys.CA 91408 

FAX (818)781-2653 



QRCLEIM ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 71 



Number 24 on your Feedback card 



m m rjumD«r ^4 on your heea 

Hams with class 



Carole Perry WB2MGP 

Media Mentors Inc. 

P.O. Box 131646 

Siaten island NY 10313-0008 

A Salute to West Point 

This past summer I was [nvited by 

Captafn Curtis Can/er to speak to po- 
lentla! members of the West Point 
Amateur Radio Club, W2KGY. 1 am 
familiar with the incredibie scenery fn 
Orange County, New York, and wel- 
comed a chance to visit that region 
again. 

A Visitor cannot heip being im- 
pressed with the breathtaking views 
of the Hudson River, especially as 
seen from a ham's vantage point — 
the roof of Bartlett Hati. The grounds 
of the United States Military Academy 
at West Point are truly beautiful. It fs 
an open base to visitors, and had 
over three miiiion guests last year. 
West Point is Orange County's prima- 
ry tourist attraction. In fact, it is New 
York State's third must popular attrac- 
tion, ranked behind New York City 
and Niagara Falls. 

Captain Carver is N2XJF and he is 
the OSC (officer in charge). It was with 



■^■^.~,f£.l 




Photo B. Captain Curtis Carver N2XJP 
with Carole Perry WB2MGP, in front of 
Bartlett Hatl. 



great pride that he escorted me on a 
tour of the faciijly. iHs expiained that 
CARC (Cadet Amateur Radio Club) 
was founded in 1928 and Is spon- 
sored by the Department of Eiectricai 
Engineering and Computer Science. 
It receives administrative support 
from that department 

The ciub station is currently outfit- 
ted with the latest communications 
equipment. These include: 

» Yaesu FT'736 satellite earth siatroh 

• Icom lC-731 all-band shortwave 
transceiver 

• Kenwood TS-440S All band short- 
wave transceiver 

• Icom IC-290 all-mode 2M transceiver 

The station has two computer sys- 
tems, including a system being in- 
stalled to provide a 24-hour mail pro- 
cessing and forwarding node and 
BBS. 

The club station currently has 
equipment to operate HF and VHF, 
SSB, FM and CW. as well as digital 
modes such as RTTY and packet. 
The cfub has a satellite station for the 
VHF/UHF bands, and high-power am- 
plifiers for the HF bands, making 
worldwide communications possible 
nearly any time. 

The annual operating budget and 
funds for new equipment are provided 
by the Directorate of Cadet Activities. 
These funds are the result of the 
generous donations of former gradu- 
ates through the Association of 
Graduates. 

I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to the 
Point and to the amateur radio club. 
There were approximately 15 cadets 
in attendance for my presentation. 
There are many ctubs and activities 
competing for the time of these hard- 
working cadets. My impression was 
that the young men who came to the 
meeting were genuinely interested in 
pursuing the hobby. Captain Carver 
promised to keep me posted as ihe 
cadets got licensed. 

On a follow-up vis ft to West Point 
in the fall, the president of CARC, 
Scott Kirkland, escorted a fellow 
teacher from my school and myself 
on a tour of the areas I had missed 
before. We were especially interested 
in seeing how the classrooms were 
set up. Teaching on an intermediate 
school level, my colleague and I en- 
joyed hearing about the teaching 
methods and curriculum aids used 
with these highly motivated cadets. It 
was a fascinating and informative ex- 
perience. 

The children in my amateur radio 
classes are looking fopivard to setting 
up skeds with CARC. That should be 
fun for everyone! 

For more fnformation about the 
amateur radio station at West Point, 
contact the Department of Electrical 




Photo A, QSL card from West Point Amateur Radio Club. 




Photo C CARC (the Cadet Amateur Radio Club). 



Engineering and Computer Sciences, Point, NY 10996, or call (914) 938 
United States Military Academy, West 2200, 



72 73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 



A 



DVERTISERS 



R.S. 

« 

351 
164 

161 

67 
194 



113 
380 
5 
282 
135 
363 
336 
^96 
57 

80 
16 
172 
41 
42 
56 
7 

166 

• 

>22 
IB4 



165 



# page 

A & A Engineering 14 

Absolute Value Systems 64 

Ace Communications 

of incJianapoiis, 39 

Advanoe Design 

LadotiatOfies, Inc 82 

Alinco Electronics, „*...»*.. „,,47 

All Electronics QDfporatlon 71 

Alphaiab. ,85 

Amateur Radio ExceJIence 17 

Amsoft 33 

Antennas West 62 

Antennas West...... 84 

Antennas West .45 

Antennas West,.,, 14 

Antennas West - 83 

Antennas West , 85 

Antennas West... .69 

Antique Radio Classified 33 

Arrow Antenna 56 

Astron Corporation ...19 

Azden Corporation ,»..,.2 

Barry Electn^nics Corporation ...23 

Bilal Company .....41 

Buckmaster Publishing 17'^ 

Buckmaster Publishing 14* 

Buckmaster Publishing ...,., „,.„85* 

Butternut Electronics .....71 

Byers Chassis Kits 14 

V Ci O OC^lOb^ I|1i(/1 ■*■',', ■■'■^'•■^■XI^^II'-II^'fOO 

CABLE X-PERTS. INC 85 

CABLE X^PERTS, INC 71 

CB City international 14 

Chipswitch „».. ..85 



R.S.# page 

186 Coaxial Dynamics 39 

156 Commpute Corporation 21 

99 Communication Concepts 84 

10 Communications 

o peci ail sis ( I nCi >, »,•»■,■,<,*■<.>*■■,■* ^ . o^ 

268 Computer Automation 

Technology 76 

276 Co mp ute r Aided Tech no i og y S4 

15 Comteico „,.*«...,..*. ,26 

• Down East Microwave 84 

114 E. H, Yost „,.„... 28 

• Electronic Distributors ,...».., 43 

• Electranics Book Club ......27 

8 Eiktnonics ,.„,85 

193 GGTE 41 

286 Hambrew Magazine .....83 

• Ham Radio ^ More.,., , ,61 

• Hamfest Mortey-Malcer,.„,..*»..„51 

• Hamtfonics, Ipk; 7 

345 HamWindows 84 

187 Marfan Technologies 17 

179 ICOM America. Inc XVa* 

283 Innotek, Inc. .., .....17 

^Ch- I V^% P V^l I rf + idli-ll-!kil--il + triil'»hi:^i-filll*ll-'il-«lri-l±lil + i ^ * 

55 J-Com ..59 

159 Japan Radio............... 1 

26 J,M,S, *wtf,ww,** ,i.,i4.,«,i,^»«i»i»«.*i,i1/ 

27 John Bell aa 

285 JPS Communications 15 

• K-Comm ,„,.», ,...,.„ ,. ......64 

2 Kawa Productions............. 68 

151 KDC Sound 83 

• Kenwood USA Corporation CV4 

• Kenwood USA Corporation.. .....13 



R.S<# page 

234 Lenti n i Communications 12 

• Meadowlake Corp 64 

86 MFJ Enterprises 11 

86 MFJ Enteiprises ...,,.,.29 

86 MFJ Enterprises.. 37 

86 MFJ Enterprises,,., , 55 

162 Michigan Radio 78 

160 M icro Co mpute r Conce pts 68 

144 Micrc^ Control Specialities..., 79 

248 Morse Tutor Gold 41 

248 Motron Electronics 76 

^ Mouser Electfonics,»„.»„.»., 85 

54 NCG/Comet ..35 

25 Novatech Instruments 17 

1 Number One Systems Ltd. ........65 

• One Hour Code 59 

102 ONV Safety Belt 63 

152 PacComm ,.,..» ,...,,.,.,...26 

* n3l3ll3X inc XI. hiP.,i,...i<.ii.,i,..i.,9 

• P.C. Electronics .65* 

• HrOi- cieCirvnics-is,i,,.,.,.,ii,-,ii'Fa,i,oi 
69 Pertphex .31 

1 98 Pe rso nal Com p uter Repeater 

Controller .63 

• Personal Database ..,.. 68 

249 Phillips Industries. Inc, ., ...82 

49 PoJyphaser 45 

257 Quonjm Communications 25 

153 Radio City SS 

58 Radio Engineers.......... 22 

• RAI Enterprises 83 

34 Ramsey Electranics...... .....21* 

147 R.LDrake Company 5 



R.S.# page 

254 Ross Dfstributing 42 

• RT Systems... .22 

• SAMS , 22 

36 Scrambling News ....,56 

167 Sescom, Inc 63 

188 SGC Inc , „ 45 

260 Software Systems 53 

325 SoldeNt Company,..,.., 61 

5 1 Spectrum Co mmunicati ens 41 

69 Spectrum Electromcs 54 

183 Spectrum International. 82 

• The Ham Center. 64 

384 The Ham Contact 73 

384 The Ham Contact 59 

131 The Ham Station 86 

• Ten-Tec 57 

269 Tlgertronics „.-,.,..,.,..,.«.,., ..,.52 

11 TranselTech .....fls 

22 Tri-Ex 52 

255 Tripp Lite 67 

■ Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf,,.. 86 

32 Universal Electronics 42 

• Untversal Radio , , 17* 

• Vanguan:i L^bs- 54 

259 Ve rsatel Co mm unications 70 

104 Vjs Study Guides, Inc 51 

191 W & W Associates ..75 

38 W9IMN Antennas 70 

64 Wiiico Electronics.. , ....45 

• Wo tfe Com munications „ . .70 

• Yaesu Electronics 
Corporation GV3 

26S Zero Surge Inc , 54 

^ Advertisers who have contribuied to the 

JSiational Advisoiy Committee (NIAC). 



wmrrmwmst^'^rmF^n'^^^^^m^ 



^F^i^F¥*W»*WWT*¥¥^"^^F^" 





Serving the LORD 
Since 1387 




THE POWER STATION 

The POWER STATION is a 12V x 7 ArripHr gel-cell 
battery complete with voltmeter, wall charger and a 
cord for charging via automobiles, it will power most 
HT's at 5 Watts for 2-4 weeks (depending upon how long-winded you 
are). Also VHF, UHF, QRP, or HF mobiles such as the KENWOOD TS-50 
{at 50W)- There are no hidden costs, all you need is your mobile, HT 
power cord or cigarette lighter adapter. 

The POWER STATION provides 12V from a cigarette plug and has two 
recessed terminals for hardwiring. A mini-phone jack with regulated 3V, 
6V, or 9V output can be used separately for CD players, Walkmans, etc, 
THE POWER STATION can be charged in an automobile in only 3 hours, 
or in the home in 8 hours. The charger will automatically shut off when the 
battery is completely charged, so you can charge it even when it has only 
been slightly discharged, (unlike Ni-Cads that have memory). Our charg- 
ing circuit uses voltage sensing circuitry, other brands are timed chargers 
which always charge the battery a full cycle, this damages their battery 
and shortens its' life it it only needs a partial charge. The POWER STATION 
has a voltmeter that shows the exact state of charge of the battery, not 
worthless idiot lights that teJI you "YOIJR BATTERY IS NOW DEAD/' The 
voltmeter can even be used to measure voltages of other sources. 



To order, send check or money order for S49.95 + 
$8.50 for shipping, along with your shipping address 
and telephone number to: 

Joe Brancato 

THE HAM CONTACT 



Guaranteed 

Best 
_ pT\tes_ 



P.O. Box 3624, Dept. 73 
Long Beach, CA 90803. 



CA Residents Add S 1/4% Sales Tax, Alasl^a, HawalU and Candian 
He&idcms, please send US. Wloney Order & Si 7. 10 Shipping. 

\l you wish moreintormation piease send a SASE lo the above Address. Far 
COD orders, cail (310) 433-5S60, outside of CA Orders only ca]] {dm) 933- 
HAM4 and teave a message, Deafcf inquires tnviled 



CtRCLE 384 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today May, 1 995 73 



Never Say Die 

CoaiinuBd from page 4 

h#'s able 1o fire it up arKJ get heal ev* 
ery lime. A whofe lor ot heat Thou- 
^mds of times mcxe heal than is avaif- 
able via any chemical reaction known 
to n^n or Sdentists. 

Serew E-MaK 

So, wtiiJe I'm nol havir>g to sil here 
reading endless E-maii. 111 spend my 
rune Ifying to manage my businesses, 
reading a ton of books, talking with 
people brighter than me on the phone, 
wriling w^&e-apple editorials, and gen- 
erally trying to entertain you and get 
you tfiinking. What do you know about 
fermlons, baryons, muons, gluons. 
pions. sub-quarks, tachions, bosons, 
leptons, and so on? 

And if I were lo be avarfable vfa 
E-mail, what kind of stuff would you 
send me? Why not use fax? That way. 
when you run across a newspaper 
clipping or obscure magazine article 
you think } ought to see, you could 
send tt 10 me immediate Jy. Oh, it you 
do fax, none of those damned cover 
sheets, understand. My secret tax 
fitjmtwr is 603-5S8-3205. Please don't 
t€4l anyone. 

The ARRL Fought RTTY 

Why cfid !l^ ARRL fight so hard and 
kmg to keep RTTV off the low bands? 
There were two basic reasons. The 
most important one was that the 
League's name was the American Ra- 
dio Relay League. Thai slemmecl from 
the first ham communications via 
spark, when radio signals wouldn't go 
very far Thus, in order to covef any 
distance, operators had to relay mes- 
sages. And so when the club started, it 
was a message relaying club. 

When CW was developed this con- 
tinued with the deveiopment of their 
national traffic handling net organiza- 
tion ^ the Brass Pounders League and 
so on. For many years thousands of 
hams orlginaied unimportant mes- 
sages and relayed them all around the 
country via the traffic nets, imitating 
Western Union and Pc^tal Telegraph. 
Only slower and with far more errors. 
Well, it was something for hams to do 
with their spaie time, Ar>d it was fun. 

So when RTTY came along around 
1948 it was seen as a serious danger 
by the Leagtie. fmagpne. a network of 
RTTYers relaying messages at 60 
wpm with no errors. ar>d all done auto- 
malicalty. I set up a RTTY station in a 
VIM store on 42nd Street in New Yof1( 
and relayed thousands of messages 
ffrortt the general public for Christmas 
in 1952 to our servicemen overseas* 
Check your back issues of CQ for a 
picture of me on the January 1953 
cover (with hair) with Bill HalMgan of 
HallicrafEers, Faye Emerson, and her 
husband Skitch Henderson. While 
you're digging through your magazine 
museum you might enjoy reading my 
old RTTY columns in CO. 

By the way, I ran so much traffic 
through my RTTY station that I made 
the ARRLs BPL tor that month. I kept 
everyone busy sending thousands of 
Christmas messages to our overseas 
servicemen all around the world. 

The ARRL also automatically fought 
every rule change proposed to the 



FCC that they didn*t originate. This 
was their way of trying to maintain total 
control of the hobby. Fortunately they 
sejdofn won these fights. 

When I became the CO editor in 
January 1955 I vtsited the FCC and 
found that everyone in the amateur ra- 
dio division really hated the League 
and their an^ogam legal counsel Paul 
Segat, who was not even a ham. 

The ARRL eventually k)st their ftght 
to prevent RTTY on the lower bands 
and activity started growing rapidly. 
When I started my RTTY column in 
195t there were only atjout 200 active 
teletype hams. Somehow I seem to get 
involved in these new lechnotogies 
early on. 

t started pusfiing repeaters when 
there were only a hundred or so in 
use. Now there are around S.DOO or 
so^ ti'ist in the US, plus some spillover 
into the commercial market with cellu- 
lar telephones. And I started Byte just 
five months after the first microcomput- 
er was put on the market by MITS. The 
first CDs came to the US in 1982 so i 
started Digital Audio m 1983. 1 started 
"CPW Fusion" \asA year, while the tech- 
nology was still in the test tube. Wetl, 
it's Still in the lab. but it'll be breaking 
out soon. 

Ham Radio Broadcasting 

With more and more amateurs get- 
ting hel yp over Baxter s seemingly 
endless ego-gratification broadcasting 
on the ham bands, perhaps it s time to 
look back over t!^ history of this as- 
pect of oyr beloved hobby. It's C04Tiirtg 
on to 60 years that I've been involved 
with hamming, so as probably the old- 
est living ediiorial-writrng ham. may tie t 
can put ttiis mess into perspective. 
This IS not a pretty story, so fasten 
your seat belt. 

When I first got involved with ama- 
teur radio we had one main ham 
broadcasting station: W1AW. They 
were on daily with bulletins and code 
practice transmissions. The transmis- 
sions were aJl automatic, so the bottom 
line was that the ARRL had their own 
private frequency in each of the ham 
bands If you happened to t>e making a 
contact on their frequency when 
schedule time arrived, you were 
crunched. 

What few amateurs knew was that 
tt^e ARRL was using paid operators (or 
W1AW. even though this was com- 
pletely illegal according to the FCC 
rules. The FCC was weJI aware ol this, 
but turned a btir>d eye. 

The last lime I visited AftftL HQ 
they had a gorgeous line of com met* 
ctal transmitters, with everything com* 
putenzed so that tbe operator could sit 
there and just watch the bulletins being 
broadcast on all bands completely au- 
tomat^caiiy. 

Though I've been an ARRL member 
for nearly 60 years, I haven't listened 
to a W1 AW broadcast since the I930s^ 
SO I have no idea of what frequencies 
and times they are broadcasting. I 
think the last time I heard W1AW was 
when they were chasing us off 160m 
on December 7th 1941. I was on the 
air the day we were shut down, and 
back on the day 2-1/2 meters was 
opened in 1945. 

In the 1930s there was no restric- 
lion against ham broadcasting, so ev- 



ery now and then, mostly on l60fWi 
some ham would get on and play 
reconds for a few hours. This event uat- 
ty tidied oft the FCC monitors, wilti Ihe 
result that the Commission passed a 
rule prohibit fng us from transmilting ex- 
cept for tt>e purposes of two-way confv- 
municatiofis. I think iha! was dumped 
on us in January 1939, as J recall. 

Naturally, as with virtually every 
new FCC regytafiofi, there were unin- 
lended ramificatkjns. The FCC mom- 
lOfs interpreted this new rute as also 
prohibiting us from relaying other bam 
Stations. Until that time networks of 
lour to eight low-powered stations 
would get together on 160m* with half 
Ihe stations on the high end of the 
band and the other half on the low 
endr all transmitting and receiving at 
the same time, making it so four to 
eight of us could just sit there and talk 
as if we were in a room together, Du- 
plex operation. Those who remember 
those days will tell you how much fun It 
was. If you run into Wall WA66MG, 
who used to be W2LBF. right around 
the corner from me in Brooklyn, ask 
about it. 

So here we are 60 years later, still 
making stupid one-way transmissions. 
Thai's crazy. Sure tt>e tel^shone start- 
ed out that way, but they qufCkly In- 
vented duplex — so why haven't we? 
Nofl Itiat irs very cfHicull. There are any 
number of ways we coukj do it, several 
of whk:h Tve discussed in past editon- 
a Is. Nothing has happened. To whk:h 1 
say phooey. 

Thirty years ago 1 set up one whale 
of a ham statk>n high up on Mt Mon- 
adnock. It was a corker! t had big ngs 
on the VHP bands, wtth a kilowatt AM 
rtg on 2m and a 336'etemen! beam 
which poked an S-7 signal down into 
North Carolina under even the worst 
propagation conditions. It was set up 
by the 73 crew and they did most of 
Ihe operating in their personal time, fsto 
one was paid to operate, and we made 
no bulletin broadcasts or anything like 
that It was just for fun. 

The next thing I knew the labor 
board was all over me. claiming that 
the station could not legally be operat- 
ed by any employees unless ttiey were 
paid at least the minimum wage. I 
pointed out that this was completely il- 
legal according to the FCC ragutarkDns. 
They pointed to W1AW. That was itie 
first time 1 kriew that tne W1 AW opera- 
tors were being illegally paid. That's 
when one of the labor board people 
mentbned that the original complaint 
had come from the ARRL. Well, this 
was al the time when Id siarted the In- 
stitute of Amateur Radio, which had 
the League very concerned. They 
seemed willing to spend whatever it 
took to put the loAR out ol business. 
Ask any old-timer about WARN, the 
Washington Amateur Radio News, 
which I was told was funded by the 
ARRL, and which seemed completely 
dedicated to attacking Ihe loAR. 

The main purpose of the Institute 
was to provide lagal funds to help am- 
ateurs fighting lawsuits which could af- 
fect us all. It was never intended to 
supplant any service the ARRL was 
providing. The loAR did indeed fund 
several such suits and helped win 
some maior ones The hams mvotved 
were amazed when ihey discovered 



fhat the ARRL would not help cover 
their legal expenses when fighting tow- 
er aT>d other such impodani cases. 

The secondary aim of the Institute 
was to keep Congress aware of the 
servk:es amateur radio was provkling. 
This, again, was not being done by the 
ARRL I had no interest m dttpticating 
anything the League was dorng, but 
ihe rnefB existence of the Institute was 
viewed by the ARRL as 3 danger 
which had to be eltmrnatdcl, 

I probably would hsve continued the 
loAR had it not been for my first di- 
vorce. That really did a )ob on me 
emotionally. Yes, ot course 1 should 
have known better but when love 
comes in, reason flies out the window. 
So I found myself married to a very 
disturbed woman and spending tens of 
thousands of dollars on psychiatrists 
This culminated when she threatened 
suicide and her doctor ordered me to 
put her in the state mental asylum. 

rd been publishing a VHF maga- 
zine {6up), a contest magazine (5-7- 
9). and a dub newsletter editor's mag- 
azir^ monthly, printing them myself on 
a press which was sel up in my 
garage. 1 was also putting together kits 
ot parts to help the readers build our 
construGtion projects. So when the di- 
vorce hTt. complete with the loss o! my 
1-1/2-year-cHd daughter TuHy. I tosi my 
steam, f folded the three small maga- 
zines, tried several times to hrre hams 
to run the parts business, and turned 
the funning of the Institute over to one 
of ttie directors, The new Instrtute sec- 
retary quietly cleaned out Ihe sizable 
treasury I'd sent him, and that was the 
end of the Institute. 

I started traveling to get my spirits 
up. In 1965 I visited hams in the 
Caribbean and went divkng around the 
British Virgins and at Curacao. I made 
a trip to Sweden. Aland, Fmland, Yu- 
goslavia, Hungary, and Geneva. In 
1966, with two other hams, I went on 
an African hunting safari, and then on 
around ihs world, gelling on the air 
from all kinds Of rare spois. Like Nepal, 
New Caledonia. Tahiti. Fiji, Kenya, 
Damascus. Afghanistan, Iran, and so 
on. When j got back, reinvlgorated, 
and ready to move ahead. I found that 
the hams I'd left to run the magazine 
three months earlier had almost killed 
Ft. It was in a real mess. 

fl didn't help Iha I Ihe entire ham in- 
dustry trad collapsed \n 1964 and 1965 
as a result of the ARRLs so-calied "In- 
centive Licensing" proposal to the 
FCC. Thai's the one that put 85% of 
the ham stores out ot business in one 
year, 90^b of the ham manufacturers, 
and closed down around ^% of the 
ham clubs* 

The chap I'd left as the assistant 
publisher and editor had nfled our cash 

I 

and done everythi:ng he could to put us 
out of business so he could heEp start 
Ham Radio. I'll tell you about that 
some time, 

Baxter 

So here we are In 1995 and we 
have two major ham broadcasting sta- 
lions, W1AW and KIMAN, I've never 
listened to K1MAN. so all I've heard 
are tapes sent to me by angry hams 
who wish Baxter would stop whai they 
perceive as his virtually endless ego- 
puling baloney which lies up atx>u1 10 



74 73 Amateur Radio Today* May. 1995 



kH^ of several ham bands for hours a 
day. 

The more serious dowrtskte ot ihis 
IS that the irritated hams are luming m 
frustraljor; io the FCC and even to 
Congress Io !ry and Slop what th^y 
see as m egomaniac from his ervdess 
self-promoiion on our ham bands. I 
hope this won1 burst any bubbles of 
optimism In your miml if I point out that 
tlie FCC Commissioners don't know 
beans about amateur radio, and don't 
care. Thus, if we make ourselves a 
nufsance over Baxter we could easily 
trigger (he normal govemmenf re- 
sponse to pfoblems: gel rid of the 
complainers. Shoot ihe messenger. 

Uf^tortitnalely we have ro bullet- 
proof vest for amateur radio. Even a 
casual look at our reguFafions will toll 
you that the basis and purpose of am- 
ateur radio is pathetically out of date. 
We are permitted to keep our billions 
and billions of dollars of ham bands 
just because we've always had em 
and the FCC has never had an occa- 
sion 10 rethink why we exist. 

I'm geUing more and more letters 
from readers who are pointing out that 
QSOs via the Internet provide inexpen- 
sive interference-free solid contacts 
anywnere m ihe worW. Tbese contacts 
make amateur radio look like we are 
slill using smoke signals. These con- 
tacts are generaling internationaV 
friendships faster than ihe ARRL's DX- 
CC is destroyif^g Itiem by forcing hams 
in rare countries oft the air to avoid the 
hord^ of OSL t^unters. 

Yes, we're stHl of use in some emer- 
gerKses. but celfutar telephones are 



rapidly putting us out of business in 
this area too. Tve tried for years to get 
hams to develop high-speed message 
handling systems for use in emergen* 
cies, but many of the ARRL traffic nets 
are sttll poking along at 10 wpm or so. 
and messing up messages. Modem 
communications technology can 
thmughpul more words m a few hours 
than every amateur who has lived has 
transmitted in the last BO years. But 
trial's not good oW-lashioned CW tech- 
nology. 

We are of no further use k\ time of 
war either as operators or technicians. 
Modern equtpment is modular, so alt 
anyone has to do is plug in repiace- 
ment modules until the equipment 
works again. Most technicians today 
don't have to have a clue how anything 
works. Engineers? We" re turning out a 
record low of them from our colleges. 
Indeed, over 50% of the graduating 
engineers from our colleges are for- 
eign students. 

One of the last things we want to do 
Is JrHtalG the FCC or Congress. So 
what can we do about some of the cra- 
zies we've let into amateur radio? Ob- 
viously the code test has totally failed 
us as a filter for craaes. tndeed, most 
of our more senous problems seem to 
be caused by Extra Class hams. 

Okay, ff we can't turn to the FCC of 
Congress to get hams like Baxter out 
of our hair, wftat can we do? How can 
we handle situations fike this our- 
selves? 

One group has semt-Kirganlzed to 
fight fire witti ftre. They tfansinit on 
KTMANs frequency (3975) on 75m for 



hours at a lime on Sunday evenings, 
domg interviews with such Baxier un* 
fans as Bill Pasternak and Hap Holly. I 
recently participated via phone patch 
and W04TA for a two-hour stir^t. We 
had call-ins with commefiis and ques< 
tions from as far as Boulder (CO). I 
coukJ get addicted to thaL It alnK>st got 
me to ttiinl^mg about puttirig up a tow- 
ef^ hanging a couple 75m dipoles from 
*t. ar»d dusting off my Henry 2K. That's 
the setup which used to put an S9 Sig- 
nal into AusfraJia on 75m. 

I've been thinking \n terms of pro- 
diiCir»g some 90-minute tapes to sell at 
hamfests where I haven't been invited 
to talk, and to see what 1 can rum out 
in the way of a syndicated broadcast 
band talk show, with me reviewing in- 
teresting books I've read, some of the 
better new CDs, and discussing pro- 
posed solutions for our social prob- 
lems. Oh, in be pushing kids to get In- 
volved in ham radio too. That's one 
part of my proposed solution to our 
lousy school system. 

While I was in Florida recently doing 
a report on the first patented cold fu- 
sion device, ) came across a small au* 
d>0 mixer and cassette recorder. Il was 
just what I've been looking for. so I 
snapped it up and brought it home. 
Wttat would happen If 1 made tapes of 
Itilngs of particular interest to hams 
and sent them to maybe 20 participat- 
ing hams with good solid kilowatt sig- 
nals for regutar tKoadcasts? Baxter is 
on 14.275, so we could take over 
14.285 on 20m and 39B5 on 7Sm. 

And then tfie next chap with an itch 
for self-promotion could get a group o^ 



big signal hams to broadcast his stuff 
on 14.295, etc. 111 bet we could run 
ham bulletin nets all the way up to 
14,315. perhaps wjpmg out the sludge 
on 313. We migtit even keep on gomg 
to 14.345! 

Of course this would set up a des- 
perate need for ham information to 
keep all these ham tnfo broadcast nets 
going, fll probably have to organize an 
infoiTnation system which woukj deliv- 
er via Ihe Internet, 

We can even send music over 
Ihese ham broadcast networks now. 
Digital audio is just data, and perfectly 
legal to transmit. Only when you gel ft 
you have to feed Ihe data into a com- 
pact disc player instead of a computer, 
though most of the new computers 
have this fuction butlUn, making it eas- 
ier. We can also send pictures and 
graphics vca either slow-scan, fax. or 
some other protocol 

So, what do you think? Should we 
get upset over Baxter taking over 10 
kHz on our bands for his gratification? 
Do any of you tune in and lis! en to him 
every day? ts he providing a valuable 
sefvice? Is it more valuable than using 
his channel for regular contacts? And 
what do you think of Baxter serrtirig no- 
tices to hams refusing to get ofl nis 
channel a notice of felony? What do you 
thfnk of the RX fining him ttx>usarx^ of 
dollars and him refusing to pay? 

Shalt t start making tapes? 

Work Ethic 

Every time I read about the vaunted 
American work ethic 1 give an an- 
noyed grunt- I've seen it at full 




itiY DIRECT FROM US, THE MANUFACTURER! 




FNB-2 
FNB^ 
FN&4A 
■ FNe-10(S) 
FN9-^2(S) 

FNS'25 
rnO 26 

FN8-27 
"FNB'27(SJ 



YAESU 

12v 

1£V 

72v 

12V 

72v 
72v 

I2v 






6O0MAH 

750 MAH 

fODOMAH 

1200 MAH 

600 MAH 

600 MAH 

600 MAH 

12O0MAH 

1500 MAH 

600 MAH 

eOOMAH 



"i/4'lonotfilianFNQ-27 
FN8 31 4.Bv 

FNB-aaCS) 48v 

FNe-35{S 72v 

• FNB 35{Si(S) 7^ 

FNB-ae BBv 

M 1/3" longer than FN8-36 



d 600 MAH 
@ ^500 MAH 
@ 600 MAH 
@ ^500 MAH 
@ 600MAH 
case 



BATTERY ELIMINATORS AVAILABLE 




NYS residents add 8 1/2% 
safes tax. Add $4.00 for 
postage and handling 



SPECIAL 

FOR THE 
MONTH OF MA Y 



Powerpac+® 

6 V for Camcorders & 1 2 V for 2-way 



on all 

STANDARD 

Replacement 
Batteries 

LOOK FOR JUNE'S 
SPECIAL OF THE MONTH 

MONTHLV DISCOUNTS 
APPUCAQLE TO EN[>USER5 ONLY 




prices and sR^citiGairo n 6 auD(4>ct tci change ^^'^t^^bcit Woiice. •• 

W & W ASSOCIATES 

800 South Broadway, Hicksville, NY 11801 

WORLD WIDE DISTRIBUTORSHIPS AVAILABLE, PLEASE INQUIRE 



MADE IN 
THE USA, 

SEND FOfl 
hnEE CATHLOO 
BlNO price: LI &T 



23 In U.S. A. and Canada Call Toll Free; (800) 221-0732 • In NY State Call:{516) 942-001 1 • Fax: (5 16) 942-1944 



cm CLE 191 ON READER SERVICE CABD 



73 Amateur RBd/o Today • May, 1 995 75 



strength all my life. 

For instance, back during the early 
part of WWII while I was going to col- 
lege I spent the summer working for 
0.E. in Schenectady (NY) lesting 
transmitters lor the Army, The old 
BC-191 and BC*375 kluges. That was 
my first job and it was my introduction 
to the American work eihic. And mind 
yoy. the whole cour>trv was lired yp to 
produce for the war effort. 

Whal 1 found was a bunch of people 
wfio were proud of thinking of better 
ways to waste time and do as littfe as 
pos$ibJe. The Army called it ""gold 
brSdtingr buf itie ■^wKkers'' at G.E. (ell 
they were beating the cofiipany wher) 
they figured a better way to put in their 
time wtthotr! domg anytti^ng. 

They really hated me The people 
on Ihe assembly line put the radios to- 
gether and then a half dozen of us 
tecJinicians woutd lesi ftiem to make 
sure they were withtn specs, ttien we' 6 
calibrate them. The other techs were 
tMklng their own sweet time, turnmg 
out four or five ngs a day, I worked up 
a head of steam and turned out a 
dozen Of so a day. I had a contest with 
{Tiyself to see how many I could do. 

The other techs got so angry with 
me actually workmg that they sabo- 
taged some or rhe rigs Td calibraied 
arKJ then complained to Ihe supervisof. 
Oh, oh, I was in trouble when they 
wereii't calibrated right. I look a closer 
look and saw where the dtals had been 
changed from my settings. I showed 
the supervisor where, when they were 
set. I'd marked Ihem with red glyptol. 



indlcattrfg that the rig was fn perfect 
calibration. Other than being threat- 
ened with arm breaking if 1 didn't slow 
down, i had no mere problems 

Shortly a her that 1 decided to join 
the Navy. There * found that, like the 
Army, gold bricking was a matter of 
pride in the Navy Only those too dumb 
to get out of working had to work. I 
never subscribed to that ptiilosophy, I 
picked the kind of work I wanted to do 
and loved doing it. t kepi the radios, 
sonars, and radars on my suh marine 
in top shape. While we were on war 
patrols I designed and buitt dfcuils to 
improve my equipment. 

So here we are with a work ethic 
that isn't what we brag about. Emptoy- 
ees in big companies, government, 
and the military are busy seeing how 
JttUe tJiey can do ar^ get pakj weit for. 
They think peopte who actually have to 
work are dumb. These people general- 
ly do not make good employees for 
smaller com parties, where individual 
ictivity is inriportant. 



Management 

While Tm trashfaig big companies 
and the military, let me also include 
management. When you are in a man- 
agement position in a big company 
you have to be very careful and not 
make waves if you hope to be promot- 
ed. The same goes for government 
and the military. 

If you have creative Ideas, these will 
make waves and you will be frozen in 
your job or fired. Ideas come from trou- 
blemakers. You get to the top by never 



being controversiali and that means 
never expressing an idea. The result is 
that big businesses, government bu* 
reaucracies. and the military are being 
run by the survivors of this weeding- 
oui process. This is why we so seldom 
see any intelligent admirals or gener- 
als, and wliy so many heads of big 
businesses are so dumb. Just took at 
how stupid GM chairman Smith was 
when laced with Perot. 

Yes. there are some exceptions. 
Bui not many. Tve met too many tjig- 
wigs and found very little hiding under 
their wigs. ri} tetl you sonr>e time about 
when the presideni of Texas Instru- 
ment refused to listen to me and cos! 
his company al least S50 billton dot- 
lars. I tried lo get An Wang to recog- 
nize the changes microcoinputers 
were going to make so his company 
could come out a winner. He said I 
was wrong. As did the president of Da- 
ta General. And the presktent of Cen- 
tronics, then the largest nfvaker of com- 
puter printers in ihe world. Now the 
building is being used to make pan- 
cake turners. 

The chairman of Tandy refused lo 
listen, so I put my advice in my editoh- 
al just to be on record. Sure enough, if 
he'd made the change I suggested, I 
believe Radio Shack would have made 
biMions more tn sales and would have 
been able to hold their 40% share of 
Ihe market instead of dropping off the 
charts. 

It wasn't that i was any genius, rt*s 
that I knew where the computer market 
was heading and Ihese captains of in- 



dustry dldn*t, I'd done my homework 
and they hadn't. 

The Genius 

Yes. t admit to being a genius. I m 
sure someone will stab me with that 
a(3mission by taking it out of conteKl. If 
you rerrsemtier, Edison said that genius 
was 99% perspiration and 1% inspira- 
tion. Or was it 90-10? Anyway. I'm the 
perspiration type of genius I Tmd that 
the more I read, talk with peopte. and 
so on. th€ more I tend to know. Pretty 
soon \ know more than 90% of Ihe 
people in thai field. J usually stop a I 
around 90^b and make do t>ecause Ihe 
next 9% can take a lifetime, I just like 
to know more than almost anyone 
else. Thaf s fir*e. 

Genius has little to do with brains or 
Id As one of ttie fourkders of American 
Mensa back m 1960. IVe met thou- 
sancts of Mensans. High lOs. yes. Stjc^ 
cessful in life or in ttusiness? Seldom, 
For the most part ttiey are a bunch of 
sfiobby tosers. Many of the early mem- 
bers were much more interesting, but 
they got fed up and dropped out. Suc- 
cess doesn't lake mu<^ brain power. It 
doesn't even take much education, 
Whal rt takes is persistence. So I read 
and read. I do my best to meet inter- 
esting people and talk with them. 
Thafs one reason Tm having so much 
fun in the cold fusion field, where IVe 
found creative people who are fasci- 
nating to know. 

Do you think ifs tin^e yet to fix our 
school system so it teaches the old; 
fashioned work ethic? 




IJ d;!9iMeld St ■^uf )^: | ^P& Sox 2749, ., €u9^SS;'Gre^n: 97402 ; 




^^^ 



'■'■••■•■'•■•••■■■• 



I I H ■ I « ■ t> 



■I ■ I i 



-a 



4^4'ltll4ll»lll*l 



ti-il-i-lf-liti* 




p . I 7 V p 






^'.'..'-°', '.'".'^'p'.'-"'- '.'. ' .' " T.'. "."»".'. ■ '.",' IS-,. ■ II dJ k.L 

^ ^ -'*,+. r-„*.% ' ' ■ l ■ I I h* I* ■ i'ljj'h. 




. ■■irrrivfriBi 
Vl-'r"-jV 



I r,- ri.-i- 




-■->;»T-. r'+vi-yv • v; 

(■■a.1.1 .i-LLj^ |i 



1-1 1- --J-, 



V-,- 





_■ i.;.— V ■' 







^mt 



iSi. 



Nouj Shipi^ingl 



RM/flM radio transtTjitters hove q unique '^equency 

I versus time stort-up chorocteristlc-even radios of the 

some moke ond model. This "FifigerPrint* con be 

[ coptured, stored and onoiyzed. Our eitclusive TxlD 

\ Softiuore ond the patented techrtotogy of the TxID-T 

IBM/Co mpQtibte circuit board con help i^ou Identify 

the obuseTS on your repeoteri Or help you keep track 

of the number of fodios per account on commercial 

repeoters* CTCSS ond DTMf decoding, os lyelf os 

Spectrum Occupancy ond Deviottoa measurement 

Matures further enhonce the system. 

Cdl or uurl te for o brodmre ujf th M] detolls^"^' ^ 
odcSdortal exorrptes, ond technical speclficotFons. 

yiiilD-l with SoRuiort $699.00 









ShJppln9/H(MMfllfiQ UPS Ground USft^ Ifl.OO ^^'^ 

)/Ha/Nt ond AM€X oetvp^d. COO on cosh or Mofvev Cld«r bqa&Ort^ 
. , Govemmertt PurdiQS« Odera occepted. -" i-^ - r-- - ' 

Ordeni (800) 338*9058 «^ 

- :::;:: tnfe; (S03) 6e7-£l \B foE (503) 687-S492 i::; .i;:r:.i::. 



CtRCLE Z4e QH READER SERVICE CARD 

76 73 Amateur Radio TodBy • May. 1 995 



CAT-300 Repeater Controller 



Attention Repeater Owners 

Finally a repeater controller with a 77 voice synthesizer andfitll 
feature autopatch incredibly priced at $299,00. 



features Include: 
■^ Voice Synthesizer 
w^(4l2) Word Vocabulary 
i/ Twelve Voice Messages 
^ Two Voice Identifiers 
^ CW Identifier 
^Fuli Feature Autopatch 
^ User Speed Dials 
w^ Emergency Speed Dials 
y Reverse Autopatch 
f/'DTMF Key Pad Test 
^DTMF Repeater Access 
t/^DIMF Repeater Muling 
^ (56) Control Funcnons 
y Remote Control Switches 
^ Hardware Logic Inputs 
^DVR Camroiler Ready * 




^Fermiie Voice ^ Sound Effects 
*^ Programmable Courtesy Tones 
^Programmable Codes and Timers 



• (R&juirts MF-tOOO Serial Imeiface Card S59.0Q} 

Write or Call for a brochure describing the CAT-300 Controller, 

including schematic, voice word listt and control Junctions, 

CAT-300 Controller Board $299 M Wu-ed mid Tested 



Computer Automation TBchnology^ Inc. 

4631 N,W. J/jT Avenue, Smie 142, Fort Lmiderdaie, Ft&rida 33309 

(305) 978-6171 



CmCL£ 2fifl ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Number 25 on your Feedback eard 



Special events 



Ham Doings Around the World 



Usfings are free of charge as space permits. Please send us your Spedat Event 
two months in advance 0/ the issue you want it to appear in. For exampfe. if you 
want if to appear in the April issue, we sftoi//d receive it by January 3 h 
Provide a dear €ondse summary of tfw ess&rtiai details about your Specmt Event, 



MAYS 

CLEVELAND, OH Natl Expos Elec- 
tronics Fair (Hamfest/Caittputer 
Sbow/Ftea Market) will be heW 9 AM-S 
PM at Emm & Sons Center, 48 E. Bam 
Rd. & Old Rt. 8. State Rd., Cuyahoga 
FaJIs/Akron OH. Setup at 7 AM. Contact 
Nat'l Expo, inc., 30799 Pinetree Rd., 
Cteveland OH 44124. let. (216) 442- 
i776. or (216} 292 7744. Reservation 
deadline is Apr. 25lh. Please send an 
SASE w/payment. You may also pay by 
credit card; FAX info to (216) 442-1776; 
Qr(2t6)292'774&. 

ET0B1C0KE, ONT. CANADA The Sky- 
wide ARC will host their annual Spring 
Hamlest/Flea Market 9 AM-1:30 PM at 
ihe Westway United Church, 8 Templar 
Dr. Vendor set-up 8 AM. Taik-in on 
146.&85 Rptr., Direct: 146.52. Contact 
Gary Westhouse VESNfT (4tS) 233^ 
2669: or t^aury Scott VE3TEY, (416) 
231-1816. 

MAY 6-7 

AHARILLO, TX The Panhandle ARC 
will hc4d ttte^r Gokten Spread hiamfest at 
the canpjs of TS.T.C, jus! east of the 
airpoft, between i-40 and Hwy. 60. Talk- 
in 00 146. 940/ .660. VE Exams Sat. Cor>- 
tact Jerotd R Mc Cown. PA.R.C. VP, 
P.O. Box 614, White Deer TX 79097- 
0614, 



MAY? 

LISBON. OH Tne Triangle ARC Ham- 
test will be held at Colufnbiana Coursty 
Fairgrounds. 8 AM-3 PM. Talk-in on 
H6J0/.B<K and 224.66, Contact Dick 
Stsley K6JKB. f2l8 Northside Ave., 
East Liverpool OH 43920-1642. Tel 
(21B) 3$5-1245: Packet: Rodney 
N8WML & KBBJNf^^EOH.OH.USAf^iA 

MAY 13 

MANITOWOC, Wl The Lakeshore 
Hamfest, Electronics & Computer 
Swapfest will be held at Manitowoc 
County Expo. Doors open at 8 AM. Set- 
up Fri. r^ight. May 12th tllJ to PM,, or 
earfy Sat. rnorning. VE Exams, Contact 
Gten, (414) 6B4-7096. anytime; or Red. 
(414} 684-9097 days. Talk-in on 
146.61 (') or 147 03(+). VE Exams for all 
classes a1 Sliver Lake College (Hwy 
1511 Tesi registration closes a( 9 AM. 
Please make checks payaWe to Manoo- 
rad Radio Club and send w^SASE to 
EG Bom 204. Manitowoc Wi 54221- 
0204 

SPRINGHILL, LA The North LA'SouIti 
AR Hamlesi will be held at tne Civic 
Center. Noflt> Main St.. 8 AM-2 PM. VE 
Exams. Swap Tables, Talk-in on 147,166 
and 146.730. For info and leservations. 
wriie NSNSX. 605 ^h NE. Springhilt LA 



71075 m (318) 539^167. 

MAY 14 

HAGERSTOWN, MD Tf>e Antietam Ra- 
dio A5sn will present 'The 1995 Great 
Hagersiown Hanrrfesr at Hagerstown Jr 
College Athletic and Rec. Center, 8:30 
AM-3 PM. Tailgate Spaces available on 
a first come-first served basis, For Rea 
Market spaces and info, call Fred Bailey 
N3HTN, (301) 416-8079: or (301) 7t4- 
0638. VE Exams by the Mountain ARC 
VEC, Pre-reg, appreciated. For Exam In- 
fo, call (304) 2&9'3576. 
LAUREL, tA The CJ.R.A.S. will hold a 
Hamfesi al MarshaEltown Comm, Col- 
lege (on Hwy 14). 8 AI^-4 PM, Reg. lor 
VE Exrims 10 AM-Noon; testing Starts at 
11 AM, Contact Ct.R.A S. PO. Bom 
tm.LaureilA 50141. 
MEDINA, OH The Medina County 
Comm. Center, 735 Latayetle Rd., is the 
location lor the i^edina County HamlesI 
'^.* The Medina 2 Meier Group, Inc. 
wiil sponsor thts event 8 AM-t PM. Ham^ 
Computer, and Bectronic Equip. Mobile 
Checfc-in on 147.6a^03 K8TV/R. Cc^n^ 
lad Medir^a Hamfest Committee. PO. 
Box 452. Medina OH 44258 Tel (216} 
725-4492. W AJW^S PM. 
WHEELING. WV The 18th annual 
Wheeling Hamfest/Computer Show will 
be hekJ al Wheeling Pk.. Rte 40, Setup 



al 6 AM. Generat admission 8 AM-3 PM. 
Flea MafkeL Contests. Banquel Workfs 
targest tetegraph key. Conlact TSRAC. 
Box 240 RR 1. Adena OH 43901, 
lelJFAX (614} 546-3930. 

MAY 19-21 

ROCHESTER, NY Tlie 61 si annual 
Rochester Hamfesl/Compuier Show, 
combined with the Atlantic Div,/NY Stale 
ARRL Conv,. will be held at Monroe 
County Fairgrounds, Rte 15A and 
Cafklns Rd. Radio and comm, equip, ^ 
computer equip,, and supplies. Setup 
Frl May I9lh at 6 AM, Indoor exhibits 
open at 8:30 AM each day. Hotel accom- 
modations at the Marriott Thruway inn. 
(716) 359-1800. Mention "Hamfest" 
when making reservations. Send licket 
requests to irv Goodman AF2K, 515 
Dnjmm Rd., Webster NY 14580 Make 
checks payable to Rochester Hamlesi, 
For info, call the Rochester Hamfest of- 
fice, (716) 424-7184 during weekday 
business hours. For a brochure, call or 
write: Rochester Hamfest. 300 White 
Spruce Bfvd.. Rochester NY 14623. 

MAY 20 

CADILLAC, Iffi The Wexaukee ARC 

wiji hold their annual Hamfest and Ey@^ 
ball OSO at the Cadltac Middte Sd»d 
starling al 8 AM. Talk-in on 146.98 For 



Join the 



FUN 



on the 



SATELLITES 

YES! Anyone wlUi a Technician Class 
license or higher can work 



the 



Coming SOON 
Phase 3D 

More Modes 
More Eaivds 
Even \IORK FL^N 




via ibe 



OSCARs 



Learn how: Join AMSAT today! 

Limited Time Offer: nfw mcnaicri & niKwuii n«iv«, FREE: 

ORBrrs - Satellite tracking software by WOSL 

OR 

Up/Down * Software listing all the amateur satellites with their 
modes and frequencies by KFOJT 

Du«»> $30 U.S. S36 Canada/M«xlco, $45 tisewhftre VISA/MC accepted 
Write or call: 




AMSAT 



PO Box 27 Washington, DC 20044 
Phone: 301-569-6062 



Amateur Software 

and Hardware for 

the Commodore User 



HRT-I 



ART-1 ; A complete imerface syetom for send 
and receive on CW^ RTTY (Baudot & ASCII) and 
AMTOH, for use with the Commociore 64/128 
ccMnp Liter. Operal I ng program on d ka k I nc! uded 

$199.00 



AJR-1 ; A complete interface system for send 
and receive on CW, BTTY (Bdudol & ASCII) and 
AMTOR, for u&e wilti Commodore VIC-SO. 
0(>erarir^ program in ROM. 

S90.95 





S WL; A r^fsivE onJy cadrtdg© *Of CW. RTTY 
(Q^LKkri &. ASCII) for use wrth Cornmodore &4i 
128. Qpefmir>g program in fKM 

$69.95 






AIRDISK: An AJR-t type Of^ 
efatang program far use with 
your inteitaoe hardware. 8oth 
VIC-^ and C64/1 28 programs 
on one disk. S39-95 

AIR-ROM: cartridge v«fsion 

or Al ROI SK for Ce4f 1 2S ooly . 

$59.95 

MORSE 
COACH 




MORSE COACH: a complete teaching 
and testing pfogram tot i«arning trie Morse 
cod e I n a cartridge. 

For C64 or C 1 2@. $49 .9 5 

VEC SPECIAL $39.95 



G AND G ELECTRONICS 

OF (VIARYLAND 



8524 DAKOTA DRIVE, OAITHERSBURG, MD 20877 

(301) 258-7373 




VJSA 



I ■ 



CIRQUE tlQ ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CnCLE 169 CM READEA S&tVICE CAM} 



73 Arrmteuf Radio Today • May» 1 995 77 



inio on tables, contact Dan KE8KU, 
(616) 775-0998, or W.AR.C., P.O. Box 
163, Cadiifac Ml 49601. 
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO The Pikes 
Peak RAA will hold a ham radio 
Swapfest 8 AM-3 PM at Liberty H.S., 
8720 Scarborough Dr., off Research 
Pkwy. Talk-in on 146.97A52. For general 
info, call Harv Hunter WA3E!B, (719) 
597-8964 VE Exams Start at 9 AM. 
Bring current license (ohg. & one copy), 
picture ID. and a check for $5.90. For In- 
fo, call Rick Brown KDOSU, (719} 531- 
9423. Send SASE with a check payable 
to PPRAA to Harv Hunter WA3E(B, 
1437 N. Chefton Rd, Cotorado Springs 
CO 30909. Tel. (719) 597-8964, 
EPHRATA, PA The Ephrata Area Rptr. 
Soc, will hold their 10th annual Hamfest 
starling at 8 AM at the Ephrata Sr. H.S., 
803 Oak Blvd. Talk-in on 145,46, VE Ex- 
ams. For advance reservations and in1o. 
write to E.A.R.S., inc., Ctearview Ave., 
Ephrata PA 1 7522; or call Tom K3RZf at 
(717} 336^2514, after 6 PM. 
FESTUS, MO The Jefferson County 
ARC will hold a Cavefest, rain or shines 
starting at 7 AM. Set-up Fri., May 19th, 
Noon-11 PM: Sat., May 20th, 4 AM-7 
AM. Cave provided by Russ Bauman, 
E lectronic/Radto/Computer Swapf est. 
VE Exams by pre-reg. Talk-in on 
147.075, 224,040 and'442.500. For 
reservations, send payment wtth SASE 
to Herb Metis, P.O Box 232, House 
Spmgs MO 63051. Tel. (314) 671-0667. 
FORESTDALE, Rl The Rhode Istand 
Amateur FM Reptr. Serv.^ Inc. will hold 
their annual Spring Auction/Flea Market 



at VFW Post 6342 on Main St. The Flea 
Market opens about 8 AM. There will be 
an auction 11 AM-3 PM. Talk-in on 
146,76. Contact Rick Fairweather 
KlKYl 144 Parkview Dr.. Pawtucket Ri 
02861: or call (401} 725-7593, 7 FM~8 
PM. 

PADUCAH, KY The Paducah ARA will 
hold its ARRL Major Event ' Dukefesf' at 
the Cheny Convention Center starting at 
8 AM. Setup at 6 AM. Flea Market; Re- 
serve tables early. Forums. VE Exams. 
Contact David Fraser KQ4iU, 5715 
BtandviilB Rd,, Paducah KY 4200t Tef. 
(502} 554-7999. TalK-ixion, 14 7.060. 

MAY 20-21 

DAYTON, OH Trade Show Productions, 
Inc. will hold the Cincinnati Computer 

Fair at Cincinnati Gardens, 2250 Sey- 
mour Rd.j Cincinnati OH. Time: Sat 10 
AM-5 PM; Sun. 10 AM-3 PM. For booth 
sales and Info, call (513) 263-3378. 
Make checks payable to Trade Show 
Productions, inc., and mail to M^rk 
Hansiip, 143 Schioss in,, Dayton OH 
45418. 

MAY 21 

CAMBRIDGE, MA A Tailgate Electron- 
Ics/Computer/ Amateur Radio Fiea Mar- 
ket will be held 9 AM-2 PM at Albany 
arid Main Sts., by the MIT Radio Soc. 
and the Harvard Wireless Club. For 
reservations and Snfo, call (617} 253- 
3776. Mail advance reservations before 
May 5th to W1GSL, PO. Box 397082 
MIT BR, Cambridge MA 02139-7032. 
Talk-in on 146.52 and 449.725/444,725 



pl2A, W1XM/R. 

WOODBURY, NY A Hamfest will be 
held at Briarcliffe College, 250 Cross- 
ways Pk. Dr., 9 AM-3 PM, by the Long 
Island Mobiie ARC. VHF Tune-up Clinic. 
VE Exams 9:30 AM- 10:30 AM. Talk-in 
on 146.25/.35, No advance tickets or ta- 
bles. For more details, call A/e// Hartman 
WE2V, (516) 462-5549, or Mark Nadei 
NK21 (516) 796-2366. 

MAY 26-2a 

TULSA, OK Maxwell Convention Cen- 
ter, Exhibit Hall A, W 7th St., between 
Denver Ave. & Houston Ave., is the lo- 
cation for the 1995 Green Country Ham- 
fest a. ARRL Oklahoma State Conven- 
tion. Flea Market. Banquet ($20 ad- 
vance reservation required), VE Exams 
Sat. & Sun. Forums. Storm Spotters 
meeting sponsored by the Nafl Weather 
Service. ARRL meetings, Activities for 
non-hams. Talk-in on 146.88. Open au- 
topalcJi on 145,27 during the event. 
Speciai hamfest discount at Double Tree 
Hotel across the street. Write to Green 
Country Hamfest Inc., PO. Box 470132. 
Tulsa OK 74147-0132. Dealers cail 
Charlie, (918) 241-4214. For general in- 
fo, call (918) 272-3081; leave msg. Also 
E-mail:Mef/m WB50SM via Com- 
pus&rve 73564, 1063. 

MAY 27 

DURHAM, NC The Durham FM Assn. 
will hold its 21st annual Hamfest/Com- 

puter Show at the South Square Shop- 
ping Mail, Highway 15-501 South and 
Chapef Hill Blvd., S AM-3 PM. Setup at 



6:30 AM. VE Exams at 10 AM, pre-reg. 
requested. Exam contact is Dave Sny- 
der N2MLU, 600 S. Churton St. m4, 
Hillsborough NC 27278. Tel. (919) 644- 
868 h Talk-in on 14 7.225 (+600) and 
145, 45 (-600). For Flea Market info, con- 
tact Rodney Draughon KD4KMi RT 4, 
Box 205, Rougemont NC 27572 Tei. 
(910} 364-7420. 

MAY 27-28 

CASPER, WY The Wyoming State AR- 
RL Hamfest will be sponsored by the 
Casper ARC Inc. Location: The Parkway 
Plaza, just off Interstate 25 and Center 
Si Banquet Sat. nighL For details, con- 
tact: C.A.B.C. Inc., W7VNJ, PO. Box 
2802, Casper WY 82602; or Steve Spier 
N7JUO, 3511 Swanton Ave., Casper 
WY 82604, Tei (307) 265-6575; or Jim 
Boyer N7VLM, 2904 Meadow Dr., 
Casper WY 82604. Tet. (307)237^0744. 

MAY 2a 

BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON, MD The 

Maryland FM Assn. will hold their annual 
Memoriai Day Hamfest at the Howard 
Co. Fairgrounds, MD RT #144, West 
Friendship MD, from a AM-3 PM. Table 
reservations paid in advance oniy. Con- 
tact Metvin Seyie WA3KZR, 15809 
Pointer Ridge Dr, Bowie MD 20716. Tet 
(301) 249-6147. Talk-in on 146,76, 
224.76, and 444.00. 

CHICAGO, IL The Chicago ARC will 
hold its annual Hamfest at DeVry Inst, of 
Tech., 3300 N. Campbell, S AM-3 PM. 
Setup at 6 AM. Tafk-in on 147.255(+), 
444.825(+). Outdoor Swapfest. For 







TS-SO 



TM-a41 TM-251 

See Us At Dayton— Booths 328-331 




TH-22AT 
TH-48A 




TM-733 



KENWOOD ® 



Michigan 




t±% 



"'if 



jj 



SERVICE 

23040 Schoenherr, Warren, Ml 48089 

1-SOO-TRU-HAMM (orders only) 

WORKING TOGETHER TO BRING YOU 
THE BEST QUAUTY FOB THE BEST PRtCE 

LoeaE & Tech 1 -SI 0-7714711, Service 1-&1[)-771-4712,, Fak Sftri/ic^ l^ei 0-771 -e54& 



lB(nQd[Mvil(i{fti[fe 
EfilJDlTgJ^tlcB and 
3r«'.u^L4y &Jii.ed Id 
irarce wlhctii podae 

day. CQDfs '.vacamfi 



I VISA j^^^^n 



OPEN 
M0N-FR^ 10-6 

SAT 10-4, 
SUN CLOSED 



TS-60 



TH-78A 




TIVI-742 




CfiPTaRE IMfiGES UKE THIS DIRECTLY 
FROM SPACE ON YOUR COMPUTER! 



CIRCLE 162 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




□ IntHfnal (tSA tiusf Svst-ems 
and PDciabliB. External (Pi^fallel 
Port) S^tetn^ Av,aiJablB. 

n Captum Fui SateNrtB Resolu- 
tion (2-3 MHas witfi MOAA Satel- 
hissl} vviih gih^r ^s.tBm. 

n fttftesaional Softvtfare vvilh 
"Pnint and SJlOOf U&w Inlariace, 
IWtousfl. Support Zoom, GSF and 
Binafv Output Fatse ColorizatidrL. 
Pnnter Sjpport. C^rkJcSng, IR 
Tennperaturs Calibraitan. Anrnna- 
tJon, Much Mdrg,.. 

D PU_ Circiitry Pravidei$ Ruler 
Siraqht ImagM. No Compli- 

CHlBd Timing Settrigg RequiF^ed. 

n SVGA lo 1024x7 66x256. 
Full VESA wdoo Support 



D R^caive <H^h Re^oluttiin 
images froiTF NOAAr Meteor 
{fiii!isiEi|i. GOfS. and Maloo&at 
Satellites, and HF Fax {Grour^d). 

n Simple Antonna O&ad top 
NOAA aod IVl9t<i<sf Satellites 
Dish WOT Fiaquireci 

Q FfMeivers. l>ovflT:CCMT[Vi&rtors. 
Antannas also Available Sepa- 
Fanaly or in CcHnpiete Syatams. 



D intamal DemoduJator 
SoftwafB onhf^ %2BS. 



■iMdi 



D Download the above and 
dozens oi otfier in^ages frDm the 

MuJtlFAX BBS 716-425-8759 

(24 hours. SN1. Wo chEwge). 
CalL WfitA, Of Fan ktr Complete 
Intormation: 



MuitfFAX 



Route 1, Box 27, P^acHand, NC 28133 
MastBrCard/Vi$a 704-272-9028 ^ Fax: 704-272-9036 



78 73 Amateur Radio Today * May, 1 995 



reservations and info, call (312) 545- 
4740; or (545) 3622; or leave a mes- 
sage On (312) 666-1606. Write to CAHC, 
5631 W. irvmg Pk. Rd., Chicago IL 
60634. 

SOREL TRACY, QUEBEC, CANADA 
The Quebec Hamfest will be lield in 
Sorel-Tracy at the Curling Club. For 
more info, write to Ctub Radio^mateur 
Sorei-Tracy, C.P. 533, Sorei, Quebec 
J3P 5N6, Csnada^ 

JUNE 3 

GRAND RAPIDS, Ml The annual IRA 
Hamfestlval will be held at the Hud- 
sonville Fairgrounds, 5 mi. west of 
Grand Rapids Doors open at 8 AM. Set- 
up at 6 AM, VE Exams al 8:30 AM, 
walk-ins onl^. Tafk-in on 147.16 link Rptr. 
systanrr. Book reservations early Con- 
tact Tom KA8YSM, or Kalhy KB&KZH^ 
(616) 698-6627: or write to IRA, 562 
B2nd St SE, Byrort Center Mf 49315. 
KITCHENER, ONTARIO, CANADA 
The 21 si annual Central Ontario Ama- 
teur Radio Fieamarket will be held at 
Bingeman Pk., 1380 Victoria St. North, 
starting al 3 AM. Setup al 6 AM. Talk-in 
on 146,97(-) and 145,21(-). For tickets 
and tables make checks payable to 
Central Ontario Amateur Radio Fleamar' 
ket, and send to Ted Eaton VE3GJE, 
102-21 Woodlawn Rd., E, Gaefph On- 
tario N1H 1G6. Canada. Tel (519) 823- 
1027. Packet: VE3GJE@VA3RWP. 
#S WON. ON. CA. NOAM. Interne t:eea ton 
@uoQLfelpt^.ca. 

TEANECK, NJ The Bergen ARA will 
hold its annual Spiing Hamfest at Fair- 
leigti Dickinson Univ. Technical Semi- 
nars. ARRL Forums. VE Exams; call 
Bob Neukomm, (201) 427-356$ bsfore 
W PM. For Hamfest info call Jim Joyce, 
(201)664-6727. 

WILMINGTON, NC The 3rd annual 
Ham Radio/Computer Equip. Seafest 
will be held by the Azalea Coast ARC at 
Trask Coliseum at UNCW, 9 AM-3 PM, 
Talk-in on 147.t80(+). VE Exams by AR- 
RL-VEC; walk-ins welcome. Bring pic- 
ture ID, copies of certificates and current 
license. Testing is scheduled tor 10 AM; 
for info contact Sam Franklin KB4IL, 
(910) 791-0484. For general info, con- 
tact AC.A.R.a, PO. Box 4044, WHm- 
ington NC 28406. Tel. (910) 686-4325 
nights^ 

JUNE 4 

BUTLER, PA The 41st Breezeshooters' 
Hamfest will be held B AM-4 PM on the 
Butler Farm Show grounds. Talk-in on 
147,96A36. To reserve Flea Market ta- 
bles, send check for $15 per table and 
an SASE lo Rey Whanger W3BtS. 5530 
Cove Run Rd., Cheswick PA 15024- 
9451. For General info call the- 
Breezeshooters' Hotline at (412) 828- 
3894. 

CONTOOCOOK, NH A Flea Market 
will be held by the Contoocook Valley 
Radio Cfub, 3 AM until ?? For details 
CJi\\(e03} 224-3899, or (603) 746-4817 
Talk-in 2m 146.B95(-) or 146.94(-), and 
52 simplex. 

PRINCETON, IL The Starved Rock Ra- 
dio Club Hamfest will be he^d at the Bu- 
reau County Fairgrounds, startmg at 6 
^M. Flea Market. Camping. Taik-in is on 
146.3557.955. Contact Bruce Burton 
KU9A, or Debbie Bufton N9DRU, 1153 
Unlor) SL, Marseilles IL 61341-1710. Tel 
[815) 795-2201. 



SPECIAL EVENT STATIONS 

MAY 6 

CHANCELLORSVILLE, VA The Ml. 
Vernon ARC will operate NJ4F from "no 
man's land" on the original battlefield, to 
commemorate the 132nd Anniversary of 
lire Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville* 
Operation will be in Ihe General portion 
of the 40 and 20 meter phone bands. 
For a certificate, send OS L and SASE to 
MVARC, PO Box 7234, Alexandria VA 
22307 USA. 

KEYPORT, WA The North Kitsap ARC 
will operate W07B 1600Z-24 00Z to 
commemorate the opening of the Mines 
and Torpedoes exhibit at the Naval Un- 
dersea Museum. Operation will be in the 
lower end of the 40, 20, 15, and 10 me- 
ter bands. For a QSL, send QSL and 
SASE to Robert J. Tomas N7KTP, 38119 
Vista Key Or NE, Hansville WA 98340 
USA. 

MAY 6-9 

FLOYD, VA The Foundation for Ama- 
teur Internati Radio Service (FAIRS) will 
operate KK4WW. US5WE, UA4LCQ, 
8R1WD and S21AM in their own coun- 
tries 1400Z May 6th-l40OZ May 9th, to 
celeb rale the 4lh Anniversary of FAIRS. 
Operation will be in the General portion 
of 40, 20 and 15 meters. For a certifi- 
cate, send QSL and a 9" x 12" SASE to 
FAIRS, PO. Box 341 Floyd VA 24091 
USA. 

MAY 7^21 

HOLLAND, Ml The Holland ARC wfil 
operate KSDAA to celebraie Tulip Time. 
Operation will be in the lower portion ot 
the General 20 and 15 meter subbands, 
and at 28.400. For a certificate, send 
QSL with call signs worked, and a 9" x 
12" SASE to Barbara SlBb&tink N8NXA, 
6418 Otis Rd., Saugatuck Ml 49453 
USA. 

MAY 20 

KODIAK ISLAND, AK The US Coast 
Guard ARC will celebrate Armed Forced 
Day by operating KL7HKX m the Gener- 
al class bands. Look for operators on 
the 20m band on 14.260 (IOTA frequen- 
cy). To receive the Coast Guard ARC 
QSL card, use the following QSL info: 
S/A/S/E please or via ARRL Bureau, 
Ur^ited States Coast Guard ARC 
KL7HKX, P.O Box 190421 USCG, Kodf- 
akAK 99619-0421 USA 

MAY 20-21 

SAN BERNARDINO, CA The Citrus 
Belt ARC will operate W6J8T 1700Z 
May 20lh-1700Z May 21st, to commem- 
orate the Civilian Conservation Corps. 
activity in the San Bernardino Nat' I For- 
est 62 years ago, W6JBT will operate in 
Ihe General portion of the 80 lo 15 me- 
ter phone, Novice 10 meter phone sub- 
bands, and 2 meter packet. For a certifi- 
cate, send QSL and 9' x 12" SASE to 
W6JBT, PO. Box 3788, 5an Bernardino 
CA 92413 USA. 

MAY 20-22 

OAK PARK, Ml The 1995 Michigan 
QSO Party will be sponsored by the Oak 
Park ARC. Operations will be 1S00Z 
Sat., May 20tli-0300Z Sun,, May 21st; 
and 1100Z Sun., May 21st-0200Z Mon„ 
May 22nd, Frequencies; CW - 1810. 
3540, 3725, 7035, 7125, 14035, 21035, 



21125, 28035, 28125. Phone - 1855, 
3905, 7280, 14280, 21380, 28430. Con- 
tact Jeffrey Albrecht N8WRY, 16193 
Locherbie, Beverly Hills Ml 48025 re- 
garding logs; or Oak Park ARC, 14300 
Oak Park Blvd., Oak Park Ml 48237 
USA, for rules. 

MAY 22-27 

VAN ALSTYNE, TX Amateur as- 
tronomers/Hams representing the south- 
west region of the Astronomical League 
wfll be operating Station K5GH at the 
I7th annual Texas Star Party. Operation 
will be -h/- QRM: 28365, 21365, 14265 
and 7265. SSTV and CW contacts on 
request. For an astronomical theme 
QSL card, send QSL/SWL report and 
SASE to K5GH-TSP 2619 Bordeaux, 
McKinr}ey TX 75070 USA. 

MAY 27-28 

CLARE, Ml The Clare County 
ARES/RACES group AA3KP will oper- 
ate 1200Z-OOOOZ to commemorate the 
11th Wildlife Festival of Clare County. 
Operation will be in the lower portFon of 
the General bands 15—80 and Novice 
10 meter voice. For a certificate, send 
QSL and a 9" x 12" SASE to Clare 
County EC, P.O. Box 262, Farwell Ml 
48622-0262 USA. 

SUMTER, SC The Sumter ARA will op- 
erate their annual Iris Festival Stalion, 
KQ7E, from the world famous 'Iris Gar- 
dens/ 2 Pfyl EDT on the 27th-2 PM EOT 
on the 28th. Listen for them on the low- 
er 30 kHz on the General portions of 75. 
40, 20, and on 28.300 thru 28.500. For a 
certificale, send $1 to The Sumter ARA, 



P.O. Box 193, Sumter SC 29150 USA, 
ATTN: Special Event 
VICKSBURG, MS The Vbksburg ARC 
will operate N5QDE in conjunction with 
Ihe Reenactment of the Siege of Vicks- 
burg Civil War Battle. Operation will be 
in the General phone portions of 40, 20, 
17. and 15 meters, and 23,465, For a 
special QSL card, send QSL and SASE 
lo Ed Magruder, 2485 Warrenton Rd., 
Vicksburg MS 39180 USA. 

MAY 29 

ELGIN, IL The Elgin ARS will operate 
W9IKN to commemorate the annual run- 
ning ol the Valley Fox Trot 10 mi. race- 
Operation will be 1200Z-1700Z in the 
lower portion of the General subbands, 
on SSB and CW. 6 meters SSB, propa- 
gation permitting. For a certificate, send 
QSL and Business size SASE lo 
EARS., P.O. Box 1351 Elgin IL 60123- 
1351 USA. ' 

JUNE 4 

PLYMOUTH, CT Radio amateurs in 

Plymouth will operate designated sta- 
tions to celebrate the bicentennial of the 
Town of Plymouth. A limited number of 
special certificates are being made 
available by the B}cer}tennial Committee 
to commemorate ihe contact. Operation 
will be in the General portions of 160, 
80. 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters as propa- 
gation allows. QSL with an SASE to 
K1EM, P.O. Box 12, Pequabuck CT 
06781 USA. Include a shipping contain- 
er large enough to hold the 9 1/4" x 13 
3/4" certificate, or a No. 10 business en- 
velope for a folded certificate; along wittr 
sufficFent retum postage. 



PERFORMANCE 
AND VALUE 

WITHOUT COMPROMISE 



KRP-5000 
REPEATER 



Word Is spreadliif fast- N^ 2 METERS-220440 

'Nothing matches thi KflP-5000 

for Iota) peHormAiic« and vilu«. Hot C2E, not mv^n Motorols." 

RF perforrnance realty counis Enjoy high perlormance opera- 



1(1 tough repeater envrron 
ment ■ the KRP-5000 
receiver gives you 7 helical 
re$0!>a!ors l2-poies of IF 
filtenn^ and a preeise 
Schmitt trigger sci^jefch with 
au I omalic threshold switch 
I rig The IranBtTrfitteif gtves 
you clean TM03 FET power 




ijon with remote programmabil- 
ity aequeniial tone paging. 
aulQpatch, reverse autopalch, 
200-numbe^ aLiiodial. remote 
t^quetch Setlff^ UJa inputs. 
conlrul outputs, and field- 
program mabte Morse messages, 

Call or write for the fuU 
perforinance story . . . and 
the super value prlcei 

Mi€ro Control Speciatties 

23 Elm Park, Grov&land, MA 01S34 
(50S J 372-3442 

FAX:(50SJ373-T304 



The first choice in 

Transmitters - Receivers 

Repeaters 

Repeater Controllers 

Power Amplifiers 
Vofce Mail Systems 




CIRCLE 144 ON READER SERVICE CARO 



73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 79 



K m numoer ^t» on y 

New products 



Number 26 on your Feedback card 



Compiled by Mike Nugent WB8GLQ 



BOYD ELECTRONICS 

Boyd's new RW Series receivers of- 
fer an excellent means of setting up a 
low cost station for QRP operation on 
20, 30, 40. and 80 meters. 

True superlieterodyne direct conver- 
sion receivers, they provide excellent 
freqyency stability, witii no drift during 
operation. 

The single circuit board features the 
NE602 mixer IC, popular among ama- 
teur receiver buiiders. An easily ad- 
justable twO'Stage input preselect filter 
reduces out-ot-band and harmonically 
related signals, and witli an approximate 
0,1 ^V sensitivity, even the weakest CW, 
SSB, and AM signais can be heard. An 
input RF GAIN controi following this filter 
reduces overloading from strong neaftjy 
Stations. 

A SEX -pole audio bandpass filter with 
a low frequency cutoff of 250 Hz and 
high frequency cutoff of 2 kHz reduces 
hum and low frequency noise f and pro- 
vides good station separation. The 
LM3S0 audio amplifier \C assures excel- 




lent audio quality and up to 2.5 watts of 
audio power when used with an 18V 
power supply. 

The receiver oscillator is isotated by a 
buffer amplifier and provides an external 
counter for monitoring the receiver's fre- 
quency. 

The circuit board and front panel ad- 
hesive decal are designed to be used 
wfth the Radio Shack 270-253 cabinet. 
Cabinet, power supply adapter, knobs, 
power swttch, connectors, and hardware 
are not supplied but are available from 
Radio Shack. 

For more Information, contact Boyd 
Efectronics Co., 1998 Southgate Way, 
Grants Pass, OR 97526; (503) 476- 
9583. Or circfe Reader Service No. 201. 




MICROTEK 

Ever wish your Ramsey FX146 2 
meter radio had some commercial-rig- 

style bells 'n' whistles? Well, with the 
RC2 Radio ControHer add-on from Mi- 
crotek, it will 

It'll have a 12-button keypad, 7- 
segment LED display, 20-channel 
memory, fast scanning (lOOms/chan- 
nel), direct entry of any frequency from 
140.000 to 179.995 MHz, and the abil- 
ity to set standard repeater offset with 
the push of a button. 



The RC2 comes with a 68HC11 mi- 
crocontroller board that plugs into the 
radio's PLL socket, a display board 
that houses the display, keypad, sta- 
tus LEDs, and a new front paneL The 
only wiring needed is +12V, GND, CD 
(carrier detect), and PTT, all of which 
are easily tapped off the radio. The 
RC2 uses the radio s original volume 
and squelch controls^ and mike and 
Speaker jacks. The main board and 
display board connect via a 26-con- 
duclor ribbon cable, and everything is 
designed to fit into the original case. 

The price is $110 plus $4 S&H (VA 
residents add sales tax). For more infor- 
mation, contact Microtek, RR3 Box 
4361, Bumpass, VA 23024; (703) 872- 
7020. Or circle Reader Service No. 205. 




JPS COMMUNICATIONS 

From JPS Communications, fnc. 
comes the new ANC-4 Antenna Noise 
Canceller. Installed at your 
receiver/transceiver's antenna con- 
nector, this RF device cancels locally 
generated noise (power line noise, 
computer/TV noise, electrical noise 
from focal machinery, etc) from sig- 
nals received by a primary antenna. 

By removing the noise before it 
gets Into the receiver and affects the 
receiver's AGO circuits, it allows re- 
ception of signals well below the noise 
level induced by the interference. 

It wori<s by detecting the local inter- 
ference signal, matching its amplitude 
but reversing its phase, thereby can- 
celling the interference. Front panel 
controls provide phase and amplitude 
adjustment, for extremely deep can- 



cellation of the offending signal. 

The unit works with any receiver/ 
transceiver with up to 150W PEP out- 
put power. A built-in RF detector auto- 
matically bypasses the unit whenever 
transmit RF is detected. (For use wfth 
a high power linear amplitier, the unjt 
must be inslalted at the lower RF level 
of the transceiver, If transmitting is an- 
ticipated.) 

The ANC-4 connects between the 
main station antenna and the receiv- 
er/transceiver's antenna connector. A 
short wire antenna and a short col- 
lapsible whip are supplied with each 
unit to act as a noise pickup antenna. 
If no main station antenna is available, 
the ANC-4 can function as an active 
antenna by plugging the noise anten- 
na (or a longer wire antenna) into the 
noise antenna jack and using the 
NOISE GAIN controi to increase the 
antenna output. The unit requires 
12VDC @ 300 mA. Adapters are 
available from JPS. 

For more information, contact JPS 
Commurifcaiion^, Inc., PO Box 97757, 
Raleigh, NC 27624-7757; (919) 790- 
1011, FAX (919) 790-1456. Or circle 
Reader Service No. 202* 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Telex introduces the DCU-1 
Pathfinder, a state of-the-art Digital 
Control Unit for Hy-Gain antenna rota- 
tors. Designed to be used with the 
Ham IV and T2X Tailtwister, it is also 
backwards compatible with any S-wire 
Hy-Gain rotator, such as tfie Ham 11 or 
Ham III, 

Featuring digital bearing readouts to 
1 degree, motor slowdown and eight- 
second automatic brake delay, it also 
offers automatic calibration and se- 
lectable center of rotation. 

Six programmable memory presets 
let you program favorite beam head- 
ings, highly desirable for contesting, 
DXing, and VHF/UHF work. You can 
easily re-set the memories at any time. 

RS-232 compatibility allows rotator 
control from your computer, and a seri- 
al pass-through capability lets you con- 
nect your radio^ temninal TNG, modem, 
etc., to this serial port. A 60-1 En e BASIC 
control program comes with the manu- 
al, and a free information package for 




software developers is available from 
tne factory. 

The DCU-1 and rotator are available 
in both 110 VAC and 220 VAC ver- 
sions, operating on 50/60 Hz. 

Suggested retail price for the T2X 
(DCU-1 and T2X Tailtwister) is 
$799.99, for the Ham IV-D (DCU 1 and 
Ham IV) $749.99, and the DCU-I by it- 
self is $619.60- Interested amateurs 
Should contact their favorite Hy-Gain 
dealer for price and availability informa- 
tion. 

For more information contact Te/ex 
Communications, inc., PO Box 5579, 
Lincoln, NE 68505; (402) 467-5321, 
FAX (402) 467-3279. Or circle Reader 
Service No. 203. 



HAMTRONICS 

It is well known that Hamtronics, Inc. 
makes a very effective wideband FM re- 
ceiver module for 137 MHz weather (ax 
reception. The new R138 Receiver now 
has a companion accessory, the AS138 
Scan Adapter Module. 

The crystal-controlled R138 Receiver 
fias four channel oscillators. You select 
a particular satellite simply by grounding 
the desired control line with an external 
switch. Crystals, available for all the 
common satellites, simply plug into 
sockets on the board. 

The new AS138 Scan Adapter lets 
you monitor the various weather satel- 
lites while you're away from the shack. 
Consisting of a small PC ijoard, it con- 
tinually monitors the receiver, scanning 
the four channels, if it hears an active 
satellite overhead, the scanner stops on 
that channel and turns on a relay. The 
relay can be used to activate a tape 
recorder, letting you play back the tape 
into your demodulator unit whenever 
you have the lime to reproduce the 
satellite images on your computer. 

At only $129, the R138 Receiver kit 
is quite a bargain. It is also available 
wired and tested for $189. The AS138 
Scan Adapter IWodule is $39 in kit form, 
$69 wired and tested. Channel crystals 













ASIHSCAHflOAPTER 



are only $12 each^ making this channel- 
ized approach much less expensive than 
synthesized receivers, even if you neec 
to buy several crystals for the sateliites 
you want to hear. And you'll get a lot o^ 
satisfaction doing the assembly yourself. 
For more details, contact Hamtronlcs 
Inc., 65-F Mould Rd. Hitton, NY 14468 
9535; (716) 392-9430, PAX (716) 392 
9420. Or circle Reader Service No, 206 
Please tell them where you saw this an- 
nouncement. You will receive a complete 
data sheet, including pre amps and hell 
cal resonator filters for the 137 MH; 
band. They also have copies of th^ 
Weather Satellite Handboook. 



SHACK ATTACK 

Display your amateur radio license in 
style, with this Callsign License Plaque. 
Handcrafted from alderwood and hand- 
finished with two coats of polyurethane 
gloss for a t]eautilul, natural appear- 
ance, this handsome dark wood plaque 
is a great way to meet FCC Section 97.3 
station license requirements while en- 
hancing the iooks of your shack. 

This 7,25" X 12" pfaque includes a 5" 
X 7" dear Pfexiglas cover for your li- 
cense, cardboard backing, self- 1 eve ling 
picture hanger hardware, and— of 
course — your callsign inset below in 
large 2" pine letters. 

The Callsign License Plaque 
is available for $19.95 plus $3,50 S&H. 
For more information, contact Shack At- 
tack, 1394 N 770 W. Depl 49, Orem. UT 
84057-5903; totf-free (800) 573-7388- E- 
rnail: kb7vrdQaol.com. Or circle Reader 
Service No. 204. 




80 73 Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 



■^^ Number 27 on 

Barter w buy 



Number 27 on your Feedback card 



T , juf old ham and oomputer gear into 4^sh now. Sure, you can wan \qs a namfesi to 
try hfni oump n, tM you knmr youl gst a laf vwm rsaJr^tic prce if you have A out wtvere 
T 00, ODO active ham pottmial buyers can see it tian tie lew hundred local hams wtx3 corr^ by 
a H^ fnaitet labia. Clieck you attic^ ^lage, ceiar aitd dbset st>sh^es and get cash for your 
ham and coitipgter gear beiore if s too old to sell. Vou kpow you're not going id use M again, 
so vvhy leave It lor youi iMliQMr ^ mTDw out? Thai stui isiil gett^ 

The 73 Rea Martiei Barter W Bu|^ costs you peanuts (almostj— comes to 35 cents a wofd 
for ireftfidual (noncofwnerciall ads and $;.00 a word for commefDal ads. Dent pten on telfaig 
a tofig slciy, Uw abbreviations, crani it in. But be hon^t There are plenty of hanis vvtio love 
lOlbe thii^Qs. so if rt doesnl mxK say so. 

Make your list, count ttie wcKt^s^ indiK^ your call address and phone nunher. include a 
check or your creetit card numtier and exptratton. It you're piacmg a commerce as^ include an 
adiMional phon^ number, separate from your ad. 

This is a rrKinthly magazine, rK)t a daily newspaper, so figure a couple months t>sfore the 
action starts; then be prepared, if you ge^ too many c^ls, you prtced ri tow. ff you doni get 
manytatlSs too high. 

Sa get busy. Blow the dust off, check everything out, makfl sure it stfll worits right and 
maybe yoir can help make a ham newcomer or retired oW timer happy with that rig you're not 
uang now. Or you migh; get busy on your compmer and put logether a list of small geaf/parls 
to send to those interested? 

Send your ads and payment to the Joyce Bocash. 73 Magstzine, Barter 'n' Buy, 70 Ri, 
202N, Peterborough NH 03459 arid get set for the phone cnlla. 



Tne deadline for tfie July 1995 cias- 
aified ad section is May 11. 1995, 

ALL ABOUT CRYSTAL SETS. Theo- 
ry arrd construct ion of crystal sel ra* 
dios. S9.95 each, ppd USA. Serid lo: 
ALLABOUT BOOKS. Dept. S. RO. 
Bom 22366, San D)ego CA 92 1 92. 

BI^B^OO 

SUPERFAST MORSE CODE 
SUPEREASY, Subliminal cassette, 
$12, LEARN MORSE CODE IN 1 
HOUR. Amazing supereasy tech- 
nique. $12, Both S20, Moneyback 
guai^nlee. Free catalog: SASE. Bahr* 
Tg, ISO Greenfield, Bloomingdale, IL 
60108, eNB221 

INCREDIBLE DX SITE for Individual 
Of harT> club iri Northern Virginia. ONE 
OF A KINDN Fully furnished 2 bed- 
room cabin with 40" x 15' deck over- 



looking Shenandoah Valley. 3.5 acres 
MOL on top REPEAT or^ lop o! Biwe 
Ridge af 2100'. ConvenienL easy ac- 
OBSS, one hour west ol DC & Dulles 
Airport. Half down, will finance bal- 
ance- Serious Buyers only. DICK 
KD4 ATB , 8 1 3^347-5444 . BNS235 

1995 Mationwide Hamfest List & 
News Letter S5 ppd. ^Hamfests 'SS' 
Box 607, Hattx>ro, PA 19040 

BNB245 

ROMAC RADIO EXCHANGE, a revo- 
lutionary new computer online service 
for buying and selling amateur radio 
equipment. Why wait for weeks or 
even months lo sell and buy equip- 
ment. Call today! Free until July U 
1995. (300 to 14400 baud. S/N/t.) 
1 -a 1 0-486-4873. B N B26 

Conimued on pagB 82 



MHk Number 

Propagation 



Number 26 on your Feedback card 



Jim Gray WtXU 

21 East Chateau OfcfB 

Payson AZ BSS4t 

Special Forecast 
This Month 

Ma Nature seems to have con- 
spired this mortth to make every week- 
eiKJ of the month Poor (P) or Fair (F) 
or trending to eitlier of these condi- 
tions. Blend that with the general 
movement away from Sprrng Equinox 
(good) to Summer Solstice (poor) for 
the HF bands, and you have a mix that 
will conspire lo make you really work 
for the DX, Add to that gloomy outlook 
the rapid decline of Sunspot Cycle 22 
to its expected nadir at the end of this 
year or early in "96, and you have 
""band condilions" that haven't been so 
bad since the last Cycle 21 al about 
this time in its progress. 

However, ihai doesn't mean there 
wofs't be any DX al all ... it just means 
you d better sharpen your skills m 
these areas: weak-siQnal copy, careful 
lislening at ait limes, and ck>se atien- 
tkm to WWV and their forecasts at 18 
minutes after each hour I use tfte 10 
MHz frequency because of Us conve- 
nience and the usually good signals 
here. 

On Ihe p/t/s side, you noay well find 
Sporadic E propagation on some days 
as high as 10 meters, with strong skip 



Jim Gray WIXU 

signals suddenly lading. Atso, even oi^ 
a dead-soLinding band, you ought to 
give at least one or two COs, as re- 
sults OQulcl be veiy surprising. 

For this monlh, those who are re- 
tired, or have weelcdays avaifab^, will 
do better than those who can operate 
only on weekends. Don't give up . . . 
better limes are ahead . _ but you 
may have to wait a few years. 

10 and 12 Meters 

Occasional F2 openings to the 
Southern Hemisphere during daylight 
hours. The bands close a I sunset 

15 and 17 Meters 

Consistent openings lo Africa and 
Latin America, and shprt skip to about 
1.000 miles during daylight. Bands 
close at sunset or shortly after 

20 Meters 

Your best band for OX to all areas 
of the world between sunrise and wel 
past sunset, and short skip to 2,000 
mifes during daylighl hours. 

30 and 40 Meters 

Good DX from sltghtfy after local 
sunset to just before local sunrise. 
Signals from the east peak between 
sunset and rrudnight. and from all otiv 
er areas between midnight and sun- 
rise. Daytime short skip to 1,000 





SUN 


MON 


MAY 1995 

TUE WED THU 


FR 


SAT 






1 G-'F 


2 F 


3 F-G 


4 G 


5 G-F 


6 F-P 




7 P 


8 P 


9 P-F 


10 F 


11 F 


12 F-P 


13P 




14 P-F 


15 G 


16 G 


17 G 


ia G 


19 G-F 


20 F 




21 F 


22 F'G 


23 G 


24 G-F 


25 F-P 


26 P 


27 P 




28 P-F 


29 F-G 


30 G 


31 G 

























miles, and nighttime skip to 2.500 
miles, 

80 and 160 Meters 

Good DX from sunset to sunrise on 
nighls of low atmosphehc noise, and 



skip to 2.000 miles or so. Requires 
vertical transmitting antennas and hori- 
zontal (preferably Beverage) antennas 
for best results on receiving. Little, If 
any day fight activity on 160. but some 
on 80 melefs. 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



om 


00 


02 


04 


06 


OB 


10 


12 


14 


16 


IB 


20 


22 


ALASKA 














n 


?0 


i 






ARGENTINA 
















15 


15 1 15 


15 


IS 


AUSTRAIEA 












40 


20 


20 




15 


15 


CANAL ZONE 


20 


^ 


m 


40 


40 




20 


ia 


15 


15 


IS 


20 


Ef^LANO 


40 


m 


40 








20 


2] 


20 


20 I 




HAWAII 




M 






40 


40 


20 


20 








IS 


INDIA 














20 


20 










JAPAN 














20 


20 










MEXICO 




40 


40 


40 


40 




20 


15 


15 


15 


IS 




PHILIPPINES 














20 


n 










PUERTO mCQ 




40 


^10 


40 






20 


15 


15 


15 


16 




SOUTH AFRICA 


















15 


15 


15 




U.SaR. 














20 


m 








, 


WISTCOAST 






so 


80 


40 


40 


40 


20 


?0 


20 






CENT 


RA 


.LUNIT 


EDS 


TA 


TE 


STO: 


ALASKA 


20 


20 










15 










ARGENTINA 




















15 


15 


15 


AUSTIN AtiA 


15 


ao 








40 


20 


20 








15 


CANAL ZONE 


20 


20 


40 


40 


40 


40 






15 


15 


15 


W 


EISH3LAND 




« 


« 










2Q 


20 


2U 


20 




HAWAtt 


t£ 


m 


m 


20 


40 


40 


40 










15 


INDIA 
















20 


20 








jMimi 
















20 


20 








MEXICO 


20 


20 


m 


40 


40 


40 






15 


15 


15 


20 


PHIUPPJNES 
















^ 


20 








PUERTtlRlCO 


20 


20 


40 


40 


40 


40 1 






^5 


15 


15 1 


20 


SOUTH AFRICA 




















15 


15 


20 


USSR 
















2D 


?3 












[N UNIT 


EDS 


TA 


TE 


STO: 


WEST 


ER 


ALASKA 


20 


2C 


20 




4C 


-U} 


1 ■■ 


4a 








15 1 


ARGENTINA 


15 


20 




40 


40 


40 










15 


15 


AUSTRALIA 




1& 


20 


20 






40 


40 










CANAL ZONE 






20 


20 


20 


20 


30 


20 








15 


ENGLAND 


















20 


20 




' 


HAWAH 


15 


20 


20 


40 


40 


40 


40 










IB 


INDIA 




20 


^o 




















JAPAN 


20 


20 


20 






40 


40 


40 






20 


20 


MEXICO 






20 


20 


20 


20 


20 










15 


PHiLIPPINES 


15 












40 




20 








PUERTO RICO 






20 


20 


'i\i 


20 


20 


20 








15 


SOUTH AFRICA 




















15 


t5 




U.S.SR 


















20 








EAST COAST 




m 


eo 


40 


40 


40 


40 


20 


20 20 







7S Amateur Radio Today* May, 1995 81 



.ComerBeam? 




SWR < L2:l acTMS tiie liaiMl 

Gun. or a L5 fl Yigi 

No dimensKin ovcf 7 ^t 

40 dB Fmnt-io Bjcfc Ratio 

0^ Kat/iiowcr Bcunwidih 

Mo^& dLrecity » masi 

Uviical or Honiofiul Polar txanoo 

lBKt»iSM5.220MH2Sl4l'roaii$n5, DuiJ 146/440 SI65 

^ki^ cHily 10 Ihs. Add Sll Sltippiag >! KaiKlUng. InEo S[, 



AMfnnasWest 
500621*^^0 11184605 



Drdcf HocUm 



I Quality Microwave TV Antennas 



WIRELESS CABLE ^ tFTS - MMOS ^ hnatcw TV 
LAn HM (Uln S0*(->-} • TuneaMe tJ tn 2.7 GllL 

• 55-C flannel Deh System S199.95 

• 36-Cnannei Otsiy System 5149.95 
- 20'Qi«nn«l DiSh Syslefn Si24.95 

muK'THai ELflnnoiics 

Dish System pjL ioi «533 • ScotM*. AZ 85252 
UFET1ME PKJ 147-7701 |^.0i Cn« M plKM AriVtl 



CfffCL£ 349 ON REAE^ER SEFrVK^ CAltD 



CJflCLE 300 Oh READEH SEHVICE CARD 



LiTZ+ LONG TONE/DTMF DECODER 



Remote control Long lone detector. DTMF detectcr, and DTMF monitor all in one unit! 

• Four simultaneously monitored DTMF events (any combination of (ong tone or DTMF}. 

• "Any** character long tone events. Minimiim duration programmable from .1 to 5 seconds. 

• DTMF key code sequence evems of up to 16 characters each. L lo 3 char, group call-up. 

• Two independently controllable relays attached to event occurrences (on, off, toggle). 

• 2400 EPS asynchronous echo of received data. (RS-232 level conversion hardware required.) 

• Kit includes 2" x 3" PCB, wire and connector components, 3.5" dislc, (5.25 op tn) and manual. 

• LTZ-Ol uses a nonvolatile EEPROM for setup storage. 

« PC compatible software included for programming/monitoring. 

- Soft ware allows easy setup of all LTZ-O) Te^tunss including events, alerts, and timers, 

- Software contains niomcor function with optional disk logging of all DTMF nciivity. 

- Software supports detailed pnniing of all semp parameters. 

- Simple serial inierf^e to comlor com2 of a PC for downloading setups (stiup downlocd parts inciudtdl. 

- The last setup downloaded is saved id disk in- between ^etup sessions. 

Quantity', emergency rei^ponse teain meiiiber aiKl other di^cuuntii avEtilable, Call for information^ 

LTZ-M $89.95^SH VISA/MC/COD 



Advante Design Laboratories. Inc. 1-800-701-8873 



CIRCLE iei QH READSER SEnVtCECAAD 



SELL YOUR PRODUCT IN 73 MAGAZINE 

CALL DAN HARPER 800-274-7373 



MOUNTS & RGCtSSORliS 



TPM^e 

6^' Pedestal 
Mount Ad- 
ju$tai3l€with 
thumb screws. 
Tnple black finish 





Extensions.,. 
Recamm ended 
tor u 56 with 
the TPM6. 

T2EXT (2") $2,95 
T4EXT (41 $4.95 
TfiEXT (61 $6-95 



$-|gd 




$^095 

THTC 

Universal Grade 

for HT, Cellular Phone, 

or Scanner. Atta<;hes to 

the AMPS plate of the TPM6 

or similar moiirrts. Securely holds 

portables from 1.375*' 102.875" wide. 

TRANSEL 




V n ik s 



I W 



V t * 



1 23 EAST SOUTH STREET 
HARVEYSBURG,OHlO 45032 
(800} 82M321 FAX:(51 3) 897-0736 

Add $5.00 S&Hon Ait Ofdersf 



CIRCLE 11 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




1691 MHz Weather 
Satellite System 



1691 MHz Hemt Pre-amp. 
modelTS-1691-F.Amp 

1961 MHz Receiver 
model TS-1 691 *Recvr 

Decoder Board & Software 
model TS'VGA^SAT4 

Low Loss Coaxial Cable (6Sft) 
wiUi connectOTB, 

other lengths available 

Track 11 Satellite Ofbftal Pnsgmm. 
Tfacks ALL satelSftes. worid map, 
print oyi 

1691 MHz Loop Yagi Afitenna 
modeM691-LY(N) 



S250 



S450 



$249 



S65 



S99 



S99 



Demonstration Disc (IBM*PC VGA compatible] 
of Signals recorded from WX-SAT system . S3 

Shipping: FOB Concord, Mass. 
Prices subject lo ciiange without notice. 



r.'diisCarfl 




SQL 



See Us At Dayton 
Booth #e€-67 



SPECTFtUM INTERNATIONAL. INC. 
Post Office Box 1034. Dept.S 
Concord, Mass. 01742, U.S.A. 
Phoner (508) ^G3 2145 
Fax: (SOB) 283-7009 



CIRCLE 1t3 ON READER SEflVICE CARD 



KPC-3 TERMINAL PROGRAM User rriendly, split 
screen, AutoConnect 32K scrollhack buffer. Inte- 
grated Editor Save & send files easily $29.95 or 
SASE (or FREE details. ComTreK. Bok 4101 , Con- 
cord N H 03302-4 101, BNfl271 

QRP TRANSMITTERS— 3 wati krts and asembled 
models for 20M. 30M. or 40M. Fun to buiiti! 2 
stamps for "mil I i water* infer. Techsonlc. 32 F Ply- 
moum Park. Conshohocken, PA 19428. BNB280 

DWYER WIND SPEED INDICATOR only S55 00 
plus $4.00 S/H. For home or oRice Accurate, low- 
cost, pra€l»e^ Roof mounted pickup. Send check or 
M,0. to: RAD'MON COMPANY, Dept A, Box 751. 
Marathon NY 13803-0751, (NY Residents add 
Sales Tax} BNB2S5 

COMMODORE 64 REPAIR. Fast lurn around. 
SOUTHERN TECHNOLOGIES AMATEUR RADIO, 
10715 SW 190th Street m, Miami FL 33157. 
(305)238-3327. BNB295 

KENWOOD AUTHORIZED REPAIR. Also ICOM. 
YaesLJ. GROTON ELECTRONICS. BoK 379, Groton 
MA 01450 (508)448-3322. BNB310 

NOW ON 80 METERS [ New knob -tuned w/digltal 
display, synthesized ORP transceiver. Complete kit 
only SI 99.95. S&H S7.00 (continenlal US). GUAR- 
ANTEED TO WORK. For tnfo send SASE: Cail wnte 
to order: S & S ENGINEERING, 14102 Brown 
Rrad. Smithsburg MD 21783: (301 H 16-0661. 

BNB334 

R CI- 29 50/2970: New modScsUkjn manual indudlr>g 
Power increase Clanfrer modification Modulation 
increase. Operating hints, and more. Parts included. 
Only S20.00 ppd in U.S. (Missoyri residents add 
SI, 15 lax), SCOTT, RO. Box 510408, SI,. Louis MO 
63151-04DB. (314*846-0252. Money Orders or 
COD- er4B340 

HR2510. RCI2950, CONNEX 3300, COBRA 148, 
GALAXY SATURN, plus many more kits 10 in- 
crease your modulation. $19,95. (800)536-0109, 

BNB350 

QSL CARDS — Standard and custom. Your Ideas 
or ours. Excellent quality. Foil stamping avaiiabie. 
Many designs and type styles, Cataiog and samples 
$1.00 refundable. WILKINS, Dept. A. Box 767, 
Aiascadefo CA 93423. 8NB370 

IT'S BACK! The return of the HW-8 Handbookr 
Second printir^g. Modifications lor the Healh QRP 
figs. Rrst class mail $11 . DX add S4 for air mail 
shipping Mike Bryce. WBaVG£, 2225 Mayflower 
NW. Masstlion OH 44547. BNB404 

ASTRON power supply, brand-new w/warranty, 
RS20M $95. RS35M Si 35, RS50M $195. Call for 
Other models. 61 8-286-011 3. BNB4 1 1 

MAHLON LOOM1S, INVENTOR OF RADIO; 
(paiemed 1872) by Thomas Appleby. (Copyright 
1957). Second printing available from JO HAN K,V. 
SVANH0LM,N3RF, SVANHOLM RESEARCH 
LABORATORIES^ P.O. Box 81. Washington DC 
20044. Please send $25.00 donation with $5,00 for 
S&H. BNB420 

BUTTERNUT ANTENNAS, NEW. In bOX. 2 left— 
H72V, $175; 3 left ^ H75B, $225. (210) 435 6190. 

BNB435. 

HAMS— NEED COMPUTER RIBBONS? Lowest 
prices. Color or black. State your needs. Free info. 
Special deal for clut>s. HARCLY(EK P.O. Box 830A, 
Coquille. OR 97423. BNB457 



82 73 Amateur Radfo Today • May. 1 995 



3 



WHY RISK FAILURES With AerJal Supports? 

Dacmn rope, b^gh UV resistani. non-siretcli Military 
Type black DOUBLE (unlike our competTtors' single) 
braided. 1-800-328-4773. BNB557 

DUPLEXER TUNING GUIDE A complete fooohlei 
showirvg step-4:)y-step instructtons on tuning afl types 
of doplexers. Included is theory ol operation, de- 
tailed diagratns and much more. Send $9.95 plus 
$2.50 s&h to RGM PUBLICATIOI^S. 533 Main 
Streei Hillsboro NM 88042. For faster service using 
a major credit card caSJ (505)895-5333 and order to- 
day. 30 day money back guaranieen BNB635 

SATELLITE EQUlPyENT Best $$$ USA. (800) 
851-6534, BNB840 

FOR SALE Icom IC-2SAT. IC*W2A, PK-S8 Laptop 
computer, persona! autopatch. Epson Printer An- 
ttiony Nota, (201 )^4-1 1 05. BNB675 

HAM RADIO REPAfR- All makes and models. Fast. 
Professional Service. AFFORDABLE ELECTRON- 
IC REPAIR, 7110 E. Thomas Rd., Scottsdale AZ 
85251 . (602)945-3908- BNB700 

ELECTRON TUBES: Alt types and sizes. Transmit- 
trng, receiving, microwave . , . Large inventory ^ 
same day shipping. DAILY ELECTRONICS, 10914 
NE 39th ST. Suite B-6, Vancouver, WA 98682. 
(800)346-6667 or (360)896-8856, BNB71 9A 

MINIATURE POLICE RADAR TRANSMITTER One 
mile range, S41 assembled ^ $31.00 kit. 9025 Cold- 
water Rd BIdg. 10OA. Fort Wayne IN 46825. 

BNB719B 

GREAT PRICES on connectors, COax, antennas 
and amateur radio equipment. 1995 catalog. S3. 00. 
RC KONTES. 465 Crottjdaho Falls, ID 83401 
^208)522-2839 BNB730 

HAM RADIO REPAIR— Prompt sen/ice, ROeERT 
HALL ELECTRONICS, 1660 McKee Rd. Suite A, 
San Jose CA 95116. (408)729-8200. BNB751 

WANTED: HAM EQUIPMENT AND RELATED 
ITEMS. Donate your excess gear, new-old-in-any- 
conditton to the Radio Glut* of Junior High School 
22. the nation's only full-time ^ nonprofH organization 
working to gel iiam radio into schools around ttie 
country as a teaching tool using our ED UCOM— Ed- 
ucation Thru Communk^aUon— program. Ser>d your 
radio to school. Yotir donated material wrill be picked 
up ANYWHERE or shipping arranged, and this 
means a tax deduction lo the full extent of ttie law 
fof you as we are an IRS 501(cH3) chanty in our 
1 5th year of service. II is always easier to donate 
and ysually more finar^cially rewarding, BUT MOST 
IMPORTANT your gift will mean a wtiole r>ew world 
of educational opportunity fOf children nationwide. 
Radios you can write oft. Kids you can't. Start 1995 
by helping a child and yourself. Write, phone or FAX 
the WB2JKJ "22 Crew" today; The RC of JHS 22, 
PO, Box 1052, New York NY 10002. 24 hours call 
(516) 674-4072 or FAX (5161 674-9600. Join us on 
the WB2JKJ CLASSROOM NET, 7.238 MHz 1200- 
1330 UTC daify and 21 .396 MHz from 1400 to 2000 
UTG Meet us at Ham-Com 95 in Arlington Texas- 
June 8 thru the 1 ith, B^JB762 

PACKET RADIO Join TAPR. Connect with (he 
largest packet^'dtgital group in the US. Creators of 
the TNC-2 standard. Benefits: newsletter, software, 
discount on kits/publicattons. $15/yeaf US, 318 
Can/'Mex. $25 elsewtiere Visa/MC When joining, 
mention 73, receive TAPR's new book. Packet Ra- 
dio: What? Why? How? {S9 value) FREE! (817)383- 
0000. Mail:8937-309 E, Tanque Verde Rd. #337, 
Tucson AZ 65749-9399. BNB765 



ULTIMATE MODIFICATION BJBLE VOL. IV 

WEW AND yORE COMPLETEm 
W&m IKE MmG OOKSRW CBitf^DHW RMX3& 

ovei4x c&PomvuDoumatKKBi uemicTois 

qvp( wo UpD FOR CBPa'S 

CWBl 9C0W^£11SlMnCSa£DCmSTALC>UA1S 
WTH HSmUCTOQ. 

ova 3aPRECAU:UJaH>U0D eil¥STAL€H«fr& 
Lien aCtClKDCS mo JWT COU db &W**\£ES CMMT^ 

KDC SOUND 

l7Z94RUt30S3 
ConM,T%7730e ** 




Ui% 40e~23l47S3 



I29S5 



yooiscMSAcncK 



Field Day Solar I 




I « 

V 



TlicS*W00BulkfIc-::JQRV56l4rF\»»ci!H(^j \ixptyvw 
npe^er on Ific vt ' r^iuAj ttic c lock or pcnavD >t7u t i (X)^ H F M^Mion 

^ 110 wi i-i^$i Antennas Wes t 

573-8425 nfc-Box 50062 ?Kf^\-^Vl *-W>5 




CIRCLE tSI OH READER SERVICE CARO 



CIRCLE 336 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



REPEATER CONTROLLER 
With AUTOPATCH $99.95 4 

DTMF Controlled Autopatch and 4 control oulptrts. Switch 
selectabk CWID. VOX or COR receiver oofitml. Assembled tested 
l>oard Included m kit. LED's for Power, TX, RX, Phone, Intel r748 
microconiroller, Board size 3.% k S3 inches. You add receiver, 
transmitter, power supply (12v), phone line, and ant^ima sj-siem. 
Circuit board ks top quality, double sided, plated through bott^ 
solder mask on both sides and parts legend Shipping S4 for UPS 
GROUND or S6 tor UPS BLUE, COD add $4. For more 
inlbrmation call or write lo: 

John Bell (702) 267-2704 

1381 Saratoga St. Minden, NV 89423 





IJ 



CIRCLE 27 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Sell Your New & Used Gear In BARTER 'N' BUY 

Classified Ads Work! Call Today. 1 -800-274-7373 



"DESIGNING A YAGI HAS 
NEVER BEEN SO EASY!" 

* , _ 73 Amateur Ratdio Today, Aptif 1P# 



ftW. 1^4119. 



11 <M2J '•4LZ ^n\ 



«>■ <llf lUi «W 1 



HI 

n 
V- 
u 
M 

ii 
u 



\ . 









t [ 



-P'4.. 



.+- — »t4 «. 









lis 

lU 

m 

\M 
IT 

HDI 
Tl 

Mi 
m 



mi 
i a I 

Mi I 
iVti 

imt 
lilt 

IMt 




Why spend big $$ on unfriendly, overpriced 
and very slow optimize-only software ??? 

Quickyagi, the htgh speed, low cost, easy-to-use soffrA^are 
features auto design & opbrnij^e plu5 performance analysis 
Wrlti amazing accuracy it will accominodate 17 elementa, 
Ffeq to 1 Ghz mnig/boom and tapered element irtodeling, 
folded dipde scater and pnnts all Mes polar pio}« and 
griapfhs Bc^ co-proc 4 no co-oroc vefsicns are tncfoded 

For PC^T wi ua K MM. VGA. IGA, CQK Hex Aid DOt 3.« «r ht^w 

Quickyagi \si sgO^' 

S«nd SA5E for oxi^Mte Hb • U€ Ctieck or Memat I Moray Dntar 
U^sana unie^ adtf 5 5% tW» tw * Sp#a 1 y 3 5" or S 2S" jflppy < irt 



EltAI Eiiteriirtses m2) 435-9523 
583d W. Alk^e Av. G le ndale. A2 BBBO& 




FOR AMA TEUR RADIO DESIGNERS 
AND BUILDERS 

■ HF * QRP • UHF " VHP ' RCVRS 
XMTRS • ORO • ANTS. * PROJECTS 




fiUU) IT- rHEW OPERATE ITJ 

NEW LOW 
PRICE! 



Quarterly $10/yc 



• HAMBREW Contests 

• From Kits To RF Design • N«w Pn>d«cts 

• Fnt: Classified Ads To SBbscribers 

■ Des^n Awards For Amatfir Bsilders 



SlS/yr. (Canida, Mexico) • S21/vr. (Intrl.) 

PO Box 26008>Lakewoodj 00802211 
VISA*MC QDly: 1-800-S-it AM RIG 



CIRCLE 285 ON DEADER SERVICE CARD 



73 Amateur Radio Today • May, 1 995 83 



n^ 



Next Day 




QSLs 

Ruinbow Assartmtm 



W> Ship Ntxt Day 2nd Daj 



r 

\ Antennas West 



400 



S29S$ 

$49,9$ 
SS4SS 
S99SS 



SS4.9S 
S49.9S 



ASAF 
SJ9^9S 
$29,95 

$S9.95 
U4.9S 
^9,95 






%W^^ 



CIRCLE 5 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



HamWindows 

Your gateway to the world. 

Software Uiat combines the amateur radio 

wjth a personal computer. 

HimWliidcnrt, Inc. 

19033 Paolliie Use 

HimtlflCtoii Btmt^, Ca. 92&4d 

t7t4rr3»^3^ PAZ C7l4}&l4'a377 



CIRCLE 345 ON REAJ}ER SERVICE CARD 



ATV CONVERTEfil 



mmgm 



DISCOVER TMt WORLD OF 



7DCM 




33 CM 



Aii4AT£UH TELEViSION CONVERTERS 

ATV$ 420-^50 (GaAS-FET) $ 49.95 M 

ATV4 f 02-eaa (OaAS-FET) H «.,$ 59,95 K»t 

^ METER VHFAMPUnEPS 
35 Wall Model JJSA „....$ 7^.95 Kil 

?S Wan Modul 075A„ $119.95 Kit 



HF AMPUffERS ptf MOTOROLA BULlEnHS 
PmtfM Lat lor Hr Ampitieri (^-3C}MH2> 
DawttMd m tw lAOTOflOLA BtdBtia 
AN?SS 300W AR313 300W 

ANTeaiiOW AB3D5 30DW 

AHTTQLaOW S63140W 

M477W29W EB£7A3D0fW 

Newfl IK WATT 2-50 MHz Amplirie^r 

POWER SPUTTERS and COaiBlNFRS 2.JmHi 

BOT W,iC5 HtJ^ 2-Port S 6&.95 

itJW V^JU PEP 2-Port „ „,.S 79.9S 

1 SOD Walt PE P 4-Pciri $ aa.95 

100 WATT420-4$O MHz PUSH-PULL 
UNEAP AMPUFtER - SSB -Fii/IATV 

KEB67-PK my-: ^™, £1 s^.^n 

KEB«7.PCS (PC Baanl) „^ .$ t a DO 

KE&67-I (ManualJ . ...^ ^ .. . . . .i^— $ &.0D 



A7P£ IFIERS 



ItNfVERSAL DtGfTAL nTEOUENCY (TEADOtfT 
TKM tWir«l>ttts<«d) ,..„ .^ $149 95 

MEATS»mUA7maAL 

CHS-a Coppm Spmod^ (B x 6 v %| .$ 22,00 

W* aiocli HBrd-tD-Rncl p$rt$ 
CHIP CAPS KemeUATC 

METALCUD wrCA CAPS-UnetoVSemoo 
RF POWER THAMSISTORS 
ARCO TRIMMER CAPACITORS 
afiOAOBANO HF THANSFORMEBS 

MtmCiRCWT mXERS 

SBL-1 (t-saoMz) $ 6.50 

SeHX[l0^lOOOMl)„. $ 7,95 



N^Vtf 



Low Pass Finery 

fenf Harmonics (Up io 300W) 

lOm,^ 1Sni, 20ni. Him, SCm & IWm 



For detallect information ^ndl prioes, call or write for our free catalog. 




cci 



iLrication 
loncepts Inc. 




"i '^''ZQ-'d 



AddM.oator 



508 Millstone Drive * Beav ere reek, Ohio 45434-5 840 
(51 3> 426-8600 • FAX (513) 429-3811 



CIRCLE 99 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Use Your Reader Sefvtee Card Today! Our Advertisers Want To Hear firani Youf 



Pocket Morse 
Code Trainer 

Learn Code Faster & Easier 
Better than code tapes 
Take it anywhere to practice 
Ideal for beginners to advance 




Features: Olllv 

• Code rates from 1 to 31 wpm ^ 

• Plays standard or Famsworth. $29.00 

• Olmensiofts 1" jt 3.S' x 2.4" 

• Runs 40 hr on one 9v battciy 

3 Modes of Operation 

I. ConUnlous fresh random code. 

( Klectsblc kttcr groups, ie A-2^ i^% iiid mace) 

2* Rttndom code practice lesL 
3. Inter active tr&lnlDg mode 

Deluxe Pocket 
Morse Code Trainer 

6 Modes of Operation $49.00 

The deluxe unit has 3 additional modes 

4. Continious newly generated QSO. 

( New OSO tre generated eveiytJEDe) 

5. Practice code exams Just like the real 
code lesL (ind. tniwer key to check iccuncy) 

6» ContJnIous random wards 

Computer Aided Technology VnaJtMC, Add S5 S^H 

10132 Monroe Dr.. Dillit, Tt 7522t PH 2l4OS(K0888 



DOWN EAST 
MICROWAVE INC. 
TRANSVERTERS 

50 MHz - GaAs FET. High level mixer, 
20W, Assem. PCB, Kit, .$295 

144 MHz - GaAs FET, High ievei mixer, 
25W, Kit $295, Assem. $395 

222 MHz - GaAs FET, High ievei mixer, 
30W, Kit ,.$295, Assem $395 

432/440 MHz - GaAs FET, High level 
mixer. Dual osc., 30W, Assem, .,,$395 

903 MHz<1,0dB NF, 1OW,Ass0m.,.$395 

1296 MHz<1 OdB NF, 3W, Krt $295 

2304-3456 MHz - 1,0dB NF, 2 Watts, 
Assem. onty„-.„„ ,„. $450 

Options available for all of the above 

Wiite or call for Catalog. 
Product descriptions available. 

DOWN EAST 
MICROWAVE INC. 

954 Rt. 51 9 

Frenchtown, NJ 08825 
TEL. 908-996-3584 
FAX 908^996-3702 



aRCLE 276 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SERIOUS ABOUT SOLAR POWER? The PVSP 
siafter kit comes with a 32 watt Solarex VLX parkel 
and a ten amp Sunlogic charge cool roller. Special 
Inifoduclory pnce $275 plus $7 shipping SUN- 
LIGHT ENERGY SYSTEMS 2225 Mayflower NW, 
Massillon OH 44647, BNB774 

R-30OA— SALES— SERVICE— PARTS lr>fo SA3E: 
MILTRONIX, P.O. Box 3541. Toledo OH 43608. 
BNBBia 

Mor99 Code Computer Interfaces $49.95, CW Fil- 
lers S39.95. IBM License Study Courses $10. 40- 
10M Four Element Phased Array Ar\lenna $495. 
Over 700 Shareware Disks rn our free Catalog. Dy- 
namic Electronics, Box 896. HarlseUe, AL 3S640, 
(205)773'275e, FAX'773-7295. B^BS 1 5 

ANARChy ONLINE is a resource tor Anarchists, In- 
vestigators, Researchers, Computer Hackers and 
Phone Phreaks Categories include: Computer 
Hacking, Investigation Techniques, Telecommunica- 
tions Tpnhnotogy and Surveiflance. Call {214)289- 
8328 far free trial access, BNB83 \ 

ELECTRONICS GRAB BAG! 500 pieces ol new 
components: inductors, capacitors, diodes, resis- 
tors. $5.00 posipaEd. ALLTRONICS, 2300 Zanker 
Rd. . San Jose CA 951 31 . BNB855 

WANTED: BUY AND SELL All types of Electron 
Tubes, Call (612)429-9397, Fa^ (612)429-0292. C 
& N ELECTRONICS, Harold Bramsledl. 6104 Egg 
Lake Road. Hugo MN 55D3B. BNB915 

COMMODORE 64 HAM PROGRAMS S disk skles^ 
over 200 ham programs $16.95v$.32 stamp gels un- 
usual software catabg of ULifilies. Games. Adtitt arvd 
British Disks, HOME-SPUN SOFTWARE Box 
1064^BB, Estero FL 33928. BIM&917 

RF TRANSISTORS, Japanese transistors and 
lubes need deaiefs, repair shops, kit makers, etc. 
for 2SC1969. 2SC2312, MBS719. MRF455, 
fy|RF454, 2SC2B79 and more. WESTGATE 
(800)213-4563, BNB950 

FREE HAM GOSPEL TRACTS. SASE. N3FTT, 
51 33 Gramercy, Ctifton Heights PA 1901 8. BNB960 

PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARDS for projects in 7$, 
Ham Radio, QST. aRRl Handbook. List SASE. 
FAR CIRCUITS, 18N640 Field Ct,, Dundee IL 
60118. BNB966 

COMING JULY 9th CARS HAWIFEST & COMPLTT-^ 
ER SHOW CONTACT KDSB RO Box 512 ^ckson 
Ml 49204 BNB967 

AZDEN SERVICE by former factory technician, 
SOUTHERN TECHNOLOGIES AMATEUR RADfO 

INC., 10715 SW 190 St. #9. Miami FL 33157. (305) 
23B-3327. BNB979 

VOICE SYSTEM— REPEATER OR SIMPLEX— 
Features include announcements, messages, pack- 
el cluster interface, alarm. In use worldwide (any 
lar>guage) PC boani and software. Complete sys- 
tem $259 U.S. Digital Communications Inc, For 
info. 1-306-781-4451. from US 1-800-663-9373, 
FAX 1 -306-78 1 -2008. BNB9e8 

SURPLUS ELECTRONIC TEST EQUIPMENT tor 

saie at deep discounts. Write, phone or fax for the 
current list. Jim Stevenson, 3401 Sunny Slope 
Road. Brfdgewater, NJ 08807; Phone/Fax 908-685- 
2296, BNB995 

ROTOR PARTS ROTOR SERVICE. ROTOR acces- 
sories; Brak-D-Lays, Quik-Connects, Pre-Set mods, 
NEW models for safe, Free catalog. CA,T.S,, 7368 
State Road 105. Pembervilte OH 43450. BNB996 



M 73 Amateur Radio Todays May, 1995 



SECRET CB BOOKS 1-29 $10 ea, SAMS b£K>ks 
$15 ea. Turve up masters books 1 -6 $20 ea.. Uniden 
export service manual $10, HCl 2950/2970 service 
manual $10. Call for free catabg ol other goodies. 
1-80a53&-0l09. BNBam 

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS T-SHIRTS. 
Fedefally Licensed Rad^o Operator tnsignia on front 
& back. Large. XL XXL {Deaters welcome.) Send 
ctieck or money order $1500 + S3. 60 S+H to Cabin 
FfaL P.O. Box 3193, Wrightwood CA 92397 or call 
for dealers info (619)249-8805 Daniel BNB1002 



SELLIMG: Motorola T1930 10 meter 
chassis; P350 RF umt; P353 modtJlator; 
power supplies, Joe. (708) 894-2482. 
Motorola 900 MHz, AM single-channel 
transceiver, best offer. Klau$. 1708) 
WANTED: Working ICOM JC-3A or IC 
WB9YeM (706)966-4835. 



iransmlttar 

P3S1 , P352 
SELLING: 

commercial 
966-4835 

3AT Klaus 
BNB1004 



Budget OSL Cards $t for samples (refundable with 
order) B.B.B.S.. 170 North Wilson Road #132. 
ColLimbus OH 43204-1263, BNB1005 

CODE 5 News and Petrtion itilonnatior^. SASE to 
KB7PNQ, 503 Dubois AtreeL Cher^ey. WA 99004. 

BNB1012 

AMATEUR RADIO REPAIR, most makes and mod- 
els, discount labor rates until June 1995 WEST- 
ERN AMATEUR RADIO REPAIR CO., John Rupe, 
Box 697, North Cove. WA 98547; (360) 267-4011. 
Thanks. AB7DR. BNB1015 

"ALMOST FREE" 40-year accumulation of RF, mi- 
crowave, coaxial and waveguide components arxl 
equiprment. Large SASE for lisl, W6KRC, P.O. Box 
6117, Uguna Nrguel CA 92607-6117. BNBt017 



GIVE YOUR 

HR-2510 HR-2600 
"BIG RIGS" 



CHIPSWITCH 

4773 Sonoma Hwy> Suite 132 
Santa Ro»a, CA 9540&4269 

Wrlls Of- caat (707) S39M9S] 2 fow FK££ Intdrnuclon 



Field Day G5RV QuicKits 



blf Jknlmnam Wc 



UWiMOOi 






^ 



' PtaoUercd SUwf Fktfiti 
fijakpFtHar Quietnei wire 

Tim ah bfeife tod waif 



CIRCLE 265 ON READER SERVICE CARD 






<l>iNible£l»G5ftV- ISMS 

BMh-l&klODlphie 

'Hdl3KCUCV 

H Qtunct 5iJ» G5RV 
2itt m-lOmfKOm 

H ibwdyMM^ i I ti. Q-tmr/i vm.m 

Chdfcf Hot Lfab*1 Ad* i9 Vftfl 



1 



Cli^CLE 296 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD METER 



Reduce exposure to potentially harmful 
electromagnetic fields. AlphaLab's fiandheld TriField™ 
Meter measures AC electric fields, AC magnetic fields 
snd radio/ micro wave power density. Find ground faults, 
AC current wires or measure high-fteld generators with 
the M^gneiic setting {.2 - 100 milligauss, 60 Hz}; identify 
poorly grounded or shielded equipment, high VDT or 
fluorescent light fietds, distinguish hot vs. ground wires 
with Electric setting (.5 - 100 kV/m, 60 Hz); measure 
antenna radiation patterns, leaky microwave ovens, etc. 
on RF/microwavm setting (SO MHz lo 3 GHz, .01 to 1 
mW/cm^. 

Electric and magnetic settings are omnidirectional, 
measuring full magnitude of fields without the need to 
reorient the meter. Price of S14S includes delivery and 
one- year warranty, 

AlphaLab, 1290 South 300 West, Salt Lake City. UT B4101. Catf 
aOO-769-3754 OR 801-487-9492 for Speedier service or free 
literature on electromagnetic radtation health risks. 








SELL YOUR PRODUCT IN 73 MAGAZINE 

CALL DAN HARPER 800-274-7373 



EVERY ISSUE OF 

73 Amateur Radio Today 
on Microfiche! 

The entire run of 73 from October, 
1 960 through last year is available. 

You can have access to the treasures 
of 73 without several hundred 
pounds of bulky back issues. Our 
24x fiche have 98 pages each and 
will fit in a card file on your desk. 

We offer a battery operated hand 
held viewer for 575, and a desk 
model for $260, Libraries have 
these readers. 

The collection of over 600 
microfiche, is available as an entire 
set, {no partial sets^ for $285 plus 
$5 shipping (USA). Annual 
updates available for $10. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money 

^^^•^' QUCKMASTER 

Route 4, Box 1630 

Mineral, Virginia 23117 
703:894-5777-800:282-562S 
Interaet: info@buck.coni 
fSn Fax 703:894-9141 C^ 




cincLE lea on reader service card 




CABLE X-PERTS, INC. 

CX; POWER SUPPUES REGULATED 



SECOM-1 1 
$61 .95/each 



SECOM-6 
$29.95/each 





SECOM-t4 

$71,95/ftach 



frifi 



SECOM-20 
$88.95/ea<^ 




hnptrt Voft^e 
Output Vo^t^ie 
OutpiJi Cunrsnt 

SECOM-6 

SECOM^1 1 
SECOM-1 4 
SECOM-20 



1I7VAC 

i3avoc 

Duty Cycle 

eAMPS 
1 1 AMPS 
14 AMPS 
20AMPS 



Continuous 

4AMPS 

SAMPS 

1 DAMPS 

1 SAMPS 



50% DUTY CYCLE 5 MINS 'ON'* 5 MINS Xy^F' 

• FEATURES 

• OVER VOLT PROTECTION 

• OVER CUHHEMT PROTECTION 

• SHORT CURCUIT PROTECTtOW 

• EXTERNAL FUSE 

• RED & BLK BINDING POST 

+ Ci^JTBtte Lighter Receptade on Secom-6 orty. 

WAAftANTY ONE YEAR Rus St^^^ 

Mot© iems stoctoed 

Sae CAB4-E X-PERTS other adveftism«nil 

ORDERS ONLY: 800-828-3340 

Tech Info; 70a-506-1 886 Fax:708-S06'1 970 

113 McHenry Rd. Suite 240 
Buffalo GfOVQ, IL 6Q0fi9-1797 



Vt^A, 



1 Complete Uteratufe Maii # W SA BE 



&. 



J 



ELECTRONIC 

COMPONENTS 

Whether you order 1 part or 
all 51,092..MOUSER Stocks 
and...sh/ps same day!! 

CALL...(800) 992-9943 



ifSiOUSEB 



for your 

FREE 

CATALOG 

958 North Main St. 
Mansfield, TX 76063 



,e 



MOUSER 

EUECTRONICS 

Sates & Stocking Lucationa Nationwide 



CIRCLE 64 ON READER SERVICE CARD 

73 Amateur Radio Todays Ua)f, ^995 85 



Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf 



REFERENCE 



RS-I The Amateur Radio Mail Order 
CatiTog and Resoyrce Directory. 4|ti 
lEdMeO & the nhni awqirdmsnY "i^^wa binA 
fnt ^'KMrDnic fihutv. ^^ifEM^i:. jfid L'liuifitnfA lar- 

iH^bhyiiit anywhefi^i Plus i Wifjlib of "valut- 
AJdcd" nrfca^iici: nuicn^ itl tn 262 jiafca. 44h 
Edil»a cleannx- ai <wA\ $&ftS I w^ S la IKI} 

TAB2701 Transmitter Hunting hy Jmrph 
M<*i'li iimi Ilfomix Curitv Rjidii,t Jirt-'tiHiti tidillfkjt 
BinplirtLfd SI 9.95 

Ui20£ RTTY Today hy D,wt' fufimm Mi^kni 
j|[iJido Itj anwU-'llr rUilkilL'klypi:. SS.SS 

T?W2 TW VVurltl Hiim Net Dii-ec*nrj' In- Mike 
Witkifw.-ikt Nt'u, — 2nil cfJiiki]!. IniKHiiHJcs itii,^ ^pc'- 
ciui initjriiM hum vAdw nctworiis and sluws >'iTu 
wben tCHJ wlUTL'^ voii cun lueil' Lhcm in. S9^ 

WGPa715B 1995 North Amertoan CaUI»oaK 
Ttw IW5 Non)i Annrntin Cjlthwit It-^iv the talb. 
iufn.'6^ dnd aildft:s.s inriirmiiiH>D fur 5CHK(K)rh^ ti- 
cciuol ridiii amj[t:urs m all i:(HJQinL*!> of Nudli 
Anenca. $\SM 

MMH24 Radio Handbook, 23rd Ed. h^ 
WUiMm I Off WfiSM Wi* paas^ ol L*wf>iliin^ j\xj 
wiet^ in Lfltrw 4hc»ii.i ridki cammuDicilitiB 
$3»JS 

WGP1234 1^5 InMm^tioria^ C^ibook rhL^ 
Kw 1995 tokimnnil Cilisoofe lias 5(h).lK¥h^ N- 
ccnmfd ndio unauun in ih? awmriiri ouuiik 



SHORTWAVE 



NQPAW94P 1995 Pa&sp<irt to Worrd 
Band Radio ifv tnierrjijiionaf HromiiiiMmM 
AcnVci^jr, Liii You^li gci the latt^^i siuiiiTCi and 
Umegridh S1955 

07R25 Tht RTTY Listener /;>■ ^W Ot/cr- 
fWrt-iff Now iind i;xpiuid(;il. This spcciatizcd liOdk 
compilt.'!s issues, { ihnmgh 25 uf l\w R'l TY 
Ummfr Nrwiiit'fU'r. Coniains up-lodJiit*, liurtl- 
Kf-iind JnlbrmLLiiLtn 4 in adviiiicod RTTY iind 
FAX ititMiuunng icchniquts anil Ircqucncics. 
SJ9.95 

09542 The Scanner Listener s Handbook 
fty iiitwiird ^mmir N2BFF Gel Uk mnM chii tif 
your ujnfvr r*idu,t $1495 

CRBSMt Scanner Modification Hand- 
book. Vol* t hy Hiii Crrek jmnhdcs Mnu^tit- 
l^rw^rd s3s^hby-msp bnslxucuoci:^ foe csifundii^ 
ihf <tpt'fdlrng ca|rahi1ii»:^ <h VHF ^kcan^cri. 
Si7J5 

CRS5M2 Scaftner Uodlfic^Uon Hand' 
t>ook Vol, 2 M fTfJI €#»4 Ki^* IE li — « ctusi' 
paioa m Vol. l, in fact Vol. Ihaji a wiMMin 
dul pnivkk-'h lEttpmvvxi jq^rwisidiv-^ jpid updiilizd 
uxiiniqiia for llie miish in VvA. 1. Thcre\ IS 
iKfW CKdlJJi^ irifiditi{:alfniiii lor papular »cii]i- 
oen. SI 7.95 

TAB 339643 Tumng In To RF Scanning 



Hofih Amcrti.'i h cmea Studi Amnict, Eaupe, 
AtriuL Aftii. ind tbc PjciTk trci 4tfti,(rlitfiivcr nif 
Hiwiu aad ihe U5. posscsyfOiBit. 555,00 

WaWNV No^ode Video. Manual, Pan 97 
Ruitt Lcftra how lo be a tuoi tadio iipcmar 
SI9,95 

AR4092 YouT RTTY/AMTOR Coin p anion 

frnntnytirtMiU'ti.'^ Ii you've jicvlit nptmk'd RTTV 
i,»r AM i I ik IvKfLu. [liis hmL is wnLii'ti L'xpL■^'ltIlly 
Jiif yitu1 Yiiu Willi" 3 find complifjik'd lirtliiiical 
Jatj^fin U^Tti Juhi informalion you can mii ri|hl 
nwjiy. YtJu'll dijvs:»viir htm' w , , . A4i«eml^lLf y<Hir 
ifwii RTTY/AM'iTm jitiitior . Unc RTTY Jind 
AMTOl^ tt» lulli u» jtmiiti^uri^ tlin.fjghi:>ul the wttrld 
. . . CtiiiipelL- in RTTY/AMTOR tcrtiusts . (iuiil 
rardigimlDX. mM 

AR3754 Radio Frequency Interference — 
How to find It and fix tt, IntLrfcamx' pnahitm-i 
41V tbAlJLrngLQji, bill oiohli.' Witil tik" lci.hiiiqijc*i 
m litis i%M.^ yiLHi L\an hi:lp iLr^cniir tikxinniK: |icjicc 
tn vtiur ndf lifaafluxid $l5g09 

DOV41 Basic ElBCtRinlca Prrpfittvd b\ rhf 

•jjiftts of ippltnl electroDiL*! and cL*i.tn)Qk:i 
cfwnmmiknki&- %IISS 

POV76 Second Level Basic Elactronic* 
ft^poftd in tkf Bmrntm of Nm'ei ffnimmi &C- 
ifucl tu Bask EkcctiuBH^ tlncDiifh tA^iimdit of 
tic mon? idviaccd Icvth of atpplial ek>£tn«ic» 



rnim PuIkt uj Sv^iielMu.' Bioids Bot> Kjy. I^Op 
ISW-I, lah BoL>kr*. Thi:* i^ :i wnntJerfOl bcdk for 
ihc VHF-UHi- scanner iisiuncr 1 1 uxphnns 
jihoui tilt viuiou^ radiL) Hands, anli^nnait. llic 
\uWh. i3X\t} ii^Ls rFCt|uc:ncii:s tbr tjvcry Jmii|tinHl-i]i? 
scfvkc , , . including the Secivt Sitvil'c, FBI, 
mitlutry. II?S, priiwins. Fish & Wildlii'c. McDon- 
ald's uiUer wintlows.^ nucU'iir stiiruii fcums, rail- 
nujcK. Riisiian sdU'llitcs, Tn^uiiury iX-pt.. wire- 
less niiLiroptiono:^ lor coriL^erts, and ?ifi cm. 
*14,*S. 

07A58 Aeronautical Communications 
Handbook fry itt)htrs E Evurts Ei^fi.insiive. 
^'hoiiirly trLMiniicfni oi sixirlwavc ocntiiuiuticjiil 
listeninii SI 9.^5 

AR4025 Beyond Line 04 Sight, Show$ 
th>'* fiiunis pyibcd kr^unj liie diiscnvcrj.' ot Ihe 
|)Kipd^4XKn mtides diai mal^ VHF DX fii,iMt< 
bic: inufkJ^ siKiriidJc'E, aufiTr^i uiid junirjl-E. 
itt et e of tcaitet. F-Ldver pnippfsiium tF^Mbo^^ 'm- 
lunal prnpa^aiioa and canli-moon^aitll. 

SiUm 

TAB 44774S Tfic Shortwave Listener's 
Q^ Book — £vi?ryihjiig you £uin1 m kium uj 
cfijitiy Stkifliv^ as't; Lisiening. OK»*iti| nEvsfii-Tn. 
jiCitosiiiriiM, onicnfL^, ffisqucncieti. and gLHluni; 
OSl^ SWL IS w cKciung hobb^ . . . ihai's 
wbalgfH rmr tnleiitsu.*d in biimftijog . . . Wayne. 
512JS 



20N&9€ Haw To Read Schematics (41fl 
Ed.) M' tJtmaM t #/f mir/E#cw Wnuoi lof lite 
hcgmfktf in ckicunoicx 1^ it j,lk^ tiX^Hnloi ill' 
foniuihrn valixaMe k« Lbc k^yis^ unti i^n^indcr- 
mg WL'tinici^iL S 19.95 

WLSWOCP Racfio Oper atof s Woftd Allra 
by Wail Stiason, WOCP Thii i% a irtimpjict 
0%7h deiaJLcd, and fomprL'hL'in^nv world M\af- 
doiigncd lo be a c^ii^itnt dc.<ik uip ctirnpunic^ 
liTrrsdin iipcnauni. $17,95 

TAB 37 109 Secrets of RF Circuit Design 

f?v .hwffh ,/. Ciitr WrillL'n in lL'Ii] ivihtt-i 
ucfmitul lurigiuijio, ctivi^rs. cvL'ryiliinji 
i'mtn siniennas lu Loms^isioH. 



DP9t9 73 Magazine frtdex 19i{)-199{) 
A i.urtLpliL-li: imkit li> trv0y AtW-^L' ^''uHt^licd |0 
7 J Mti}tii::ine ihnxti^h IV^k JHM uijtwuv 

TAS 11065-1 Mastering Radio Frequency 
Circuits hy lix! (.an. 4 M p il yiHi n^ micr- 
i.*^tcd HI le^iming iihntit ridut ciintp^>ni>.'nii dod 
aruiiiu, iMs hixk k pvjll Piu% iiiL«iv sk 4 Km 
^gf timpie cincutu yiiti can build. 1 1 cx.piainv 
htJw 4;ir{:uit^ livtTrk. aboul U*!it i^i|iiipmciiU rv- 
ifiHvw^. ihtr works Tiiifi will laia: 11 Un iil ibi; 
mysmiy oui (il hi)* radius wnfk,..lhu Cflsy wuy. 
Ttiis wi.il Ix; im^ itl' your bailor S2(J 
iKiin inviL'RiitiL'nLii, 




SOFTWARE 



GSTE Morse Tutor FriHti lx;|]nEti.f m tint) ("li\i 
Cttdt;' tn>m I u% oust 100 wEnb pn minute SijikLuil iir 
PiafliilHirtli tnuA-. Cicalir vnar ciftTt 4^ll!<j. I: utttv vi mri nit 
(D fix lufiinfraau^ 3 |i|" fkfpy ft* I6M PC. XL AT. 

GCil/3Mw«TpiorV-:- [>i4 Si»ii 

CGAI>V5Q^ Edition -~ :' [>iL S^StM 



M.-ih:iiatii: JiymbiH^^ <ttJi|riinv 4nil '.:rrirLl;iitfi|J fVE,i 



lest. 





IBMPait* 


CmiVHkv^F^ff 


Plix 


hfewitti 


LZlB^^mi 


Uit<»M(H 


SWLfS 


T«4 


LZISAIC 


LZn*lW2 


SHL^ 


G^s^ 


umm 


LZTflMnl 


SMlǤ 


A^vnx 


LZmMW 


i^riiMai 


Slf.f? 


Esai 


LZUMDS 


LZCUMU 


Slf.t5 



'A(idS2U)k*>l/rE]UE 



WSGWHO Ham OpefTlor Sducatfon Pacli* 

bo* I J jT aisd 5 l/1"ifcks. S3*JS 

W5GWNSV. fJoCod« Ham Radio Software 
Package for PC's, cnnumiy Mnh ^ 1/2' ind 
? I« diiLs ^2935 

m 

Lanre CcMie PfogramsHAvaHatilo on S V** * 
dillt) Iati^vh-'i'' ^- ovi^^cL' M.ujy fiuJc k>.ik nngmiii 

it* bolh (fc: CW '-Ir r^irnmitkidv* inO Ibe t6M t(i«T|ii4iii 



VIS study Canis r 


iM|«a. iqMiHliftc iivli Oi4 


ftLih ki.v UsT^ LDiktfifed.Onf di Iw4 Fiffmtl4-^| 


^itfU-d iiHL Scliirnii^tu? aa mor 


ilQf^itK Ui^d 


SllCl^SFLiLLy hy 


i^e^tiiHt* 




MISO 


VlStU 


SIL»5 


TtCH 


%1S<I2 


1ILV5 


GENERAL 


VISii.\ 


f-ftF 


ADVAWTfJ 


VCOH 


15.^- 


DTTRA 


M<?fl< 


NJ5 



L4Sr CHANCE ITEMS 



ONL Y A 

PC5066 Digital Logic Gates and 
Firp~FlQp$ by km R. Sindair A fiiin 
foiiiidatiun in digitai electronics. Tneats 
the topics of gat^ti and flip-ftnps thor- 
oughly from tliL" beginning. H^JM 

PCSna Electronic Test Equip- 
inent Handbook by Steve Monfy A 
guicte 10 e^k;ctronic test equipriH^ni for the 



FEW LEFT 

enguieer. technician, student uml hame 
enthusiast. $18,00 

PC5007 Practical Digital Electron- 
ics Handbook i>y Mik^ Toniey 8 A 
Contains, nine digiraL lest gear projects, 
DigiinL die u its. i<}gic giites. bi-i[dhk'> .md 
fimer^. microporcessor^ memory and m- 
pU[/«>Uiput devices. SI4J0 



WAYNE'S PfCKS 



WG2 The lyfiliion Dollar Video nKpl;im«i 
hifw jusi Liixjuc Einy (jomiiiimiy CM) iiit^rL^Jisc sidtis 
by over u rnijiioji tlollars iJiniiuiiii lIil; snt^wky tsikci 
iiiiylliiignt) ust.' ol' promodon. Expiyln.^ m iluuiil 
bi.)w ytHi tLin gcL ions tiriirL'i? iidvcnisinj!. llsK"]!.' 
Wu^ritJ shows yon Now lu bent Lilc sysii^m. 

♦'SEEK YOL!" bv The Ham Uind The ttllL-s 
intiu^je "Always nn lbc air \ "iki itn; MtJikl^y 
Evening Gray line". "RffJk> Widim". 'The Tnp 
1)0 Dnjr'Uu^^^ "rtic Qmlhi^kr' jnd M^vtzn mLHx^ Ham 



radifi CD indudt!s uwiXTiL^nccM llul rmJiii hiiirs 
^i\ lliHiugli. This is jsn cJ^mnnL'^y unLt;n«ininjj CD 
iind wiJ] sLriki; a yii^Jfd wMh jmy mdiy hum, SWL 
or XYL— an ide:il prcsL^nit SYCD SI 5 
STtAPC Sl€. 



iB8657 D urn bin g Us Down: Tine Hidden 
Cuiricufum Of Compulsory Schooling, try 
A*ttti Utttkt If viwi t.ni',i>vJ " IKxI-sn- W.jr\ you'll 
i^njny ihis jlso. A W^yne Utatn t\s:vfmaeoikid 



ARRL BOOKS 

ARIW^ AMML 1W5 Handhonk (7li< Kd.^ 
idded UdkF^ nqmnfd ue^nk'in I'l i^ ^ttd 1^ L ail 

AIIOIM ARKL OEKr34iB|F ^Mma^ im EdJ Itfir 

■iDDi m htm m tmh^. lia hea u^ ut )oiir 44i«triL o- 
dudiDs imcf ficiiUL kasne wa^ima$. OSCAR, \Wr- 
iriff SJ8,00 

siej» 

ARA207 WtFB"i Desi^ ><ilebook frv fhnr /A-Mjm- 
IVY/-7J Rllcii with mtvpli!: pri^iliCiJ pnnjcds thitt trjit he 

hiiilL u^sieiji ri^iKli]}/ ^vailiihlt! v's^tipDiKHis atul comtthm 
IjLiliilUitilH.SIftXMt 

AKOIO: Siilid S|iil£ DeiiLp Gi,mm1, hi!uijc MonnuUon. 

crifCUii JL'xij<ns unil jppli€:iuoii.s; dL^SLtipliiin^ uf re 
tdvijrs, ||-jii-MimU'r^ rKfwtT suiiptii;^.. liUlI U'St ctjiiip 

AR4I71 N(w ^'(Mi're TaDdj^! All \"iio \f^ U Gel 
Y'OIH' 1*11^1 K;iju Radh L1crn» (2ad l-'ditkiiil A 

viitlei esam Fracrlical iiiJariiuiH» ^^ hcpviet 
Denk & writtfi cicariv an! sdiifih »d a Ncnal] dcses. 

AR47lt ARRI Rr peeler D tret tori m4-l^^5 

inj[THji| tarn cban. fra^-acv amtdituicir^ AltRL 
j^^niil H^rvkr ctd^ ii&t bcULm Itanp Inim J4 VlfEi' 

AH3l9i Tl» DX€€ CAoifMiiion frir Jim Kearmut 

ANTENNAS ^^ 

AR4U4 l^w Profile Anuteur Rjdici hui ilk' Hitni 

wl«i livL-N wkii" iinlcnnas arc inwnuJ li|khi. l-ium hkl- 
tnj; your «i.Eitf:nn<i lo ciji<;riitinj! wjUi, Id^a' p(iwi,'r ThiH 
bciob id Is you hnw m gu'i on thu iiir iismji \b^H 
t;:luik|Ut^, aiuJ iiOlfi¥,wJlhHhLii uiiOiiig aiLri)Ui)<i Ut y^i- 

UE220 Tha Easy Wire Antenna Handbook by 

fiilf rai^ tul osy fii fitakl ^ ^nt;? ^i^y wifr& * $9JS 
WGP87034 A« iboi4t Ciiiical QukI Amennas 

QiutaJ des||t. ihb^iLint, iJufbanKiHia. 4,ipcr4iHin S€'* 
tool »l BflfteH MH. I^irdtt^ SILfS 



vua ■CL^l ii> he A sik:cl-^^ hil PXef S&M 
ARE25lrLd«lk>c4 SptralSJiJO 

ARJlTTTlc AKRL Sprc^ Spcrtmu Sbiirft iHk. 

Rmn 1 <lKX|iiJ^dy <<ini(ile Ne^nsimi:. d «rx^ iif «S- 

boRS. Tte. hinyi. ^KLMidb Ml MlKks. ^a^as ani fov- 
annii-'iii %t:piifb ttui ikicyiiKBt the procn& whovby 

thnnl 111 Jkr jinH~4^trs. S20.W 

AR2M6(I Trammk^lnn Utie Tnuiiformers ^nd E(l,| 

/7i"i>r Ji'm St'\i-ii-iL W2i-MI PrLUJiiL-al iksiijii.s jjhI -spC' 

sumrccs iiI'mntuTiuJ $2(1.(10 

AR3^1 Htujs mid Kink^i Ufiis fiv ^iiinj! ii|i yc^ur 

fi!^ r^iiraiinrijrLuhli:. L<ri1q<<nl inpt^niliiin. SiOj(H) 

ARRL Litemtr Mntiuallv runqilcic FCC qutsliofl 
|»^oJi'*jih;iiiswi,iv 

AR4 J It I Teclmkiw Cbes^ % 6.UU 

MiAt^ Gciitnl Civn. $1 ZOO 

ARm4 Ad^vncvd ilaet $ SlOO 

AR32£2 Lnn Ctvs I &€0 

AR3iJ)5 Tbf SatrUttt Fipernnfnta^'^ Baodboolu 
Cod E4Li J"- W.MF- /» : : ^,:rSCEipaai.-d kmJ 
r-p^i^Al F<%.ii^J^ ui ^^iiclltk;^ toili h^ :md kv ihc m* 
kaBJbiHut r.feiii' JiiLdv'Wi:raiiiiiiaiit>' S^ZAJM 

AO>^D Vour Gat^a;! to Packet Hadio Oad Wd4 
Jifh i:iii:t)itiiii^ yiiv i^vd (o Im^^ iikim thi^ piftdbr 



TAB 32T0(P Practical 
Sccofld EdtiHMi. t994. Ji^Tb Cjit; Tab Bwks 
Tins 56*1 pjfie book is a le^I ixtrjiiajfL- Ksti^ %tth 
dif fuuUineiilils c*f mt'eiiBi: ^uni lirallim: itiL-iTy. 
ifjipluitx jht^l pfvijWiiulii*?! uf aJJ bfkh, Jthl ilk'Q 
pnrvhkf a im o\ i3S\ jjrttemu ciHiitmiCf hhi pn fL\i2i 
Covcra anU'^nas And feL'ikr^ \vt jII hjthl'^ Ttii: 
expfsnaitnns 4rc simpli: ajid ^^'11 ilhi^lrjli'd. «hlh 
Mink' m.;jlh. uhkTv; ir^ Ljii;i^oidJhJi\ hul it wun't txi^ 
yctu di^wt) 1 1 trvL7ii ha^ the ZL- Speck I iiriU'nna. 
wludr rvt; usal nn 2()ti] with som: sptMLiculur DX- 
ind !^iii;i;l%s, A kiw lui^L' i>l radiation and hiislIc ii si^o 
L ciHild ^MEiys work the tufl' sliiE'l Llriil , . , WEiycKr, 

AR4734 ABRL Antenna Book Ihi: new jht^ 
MUi^ rqirc^niv ihi' licsi and muM liii^iily ri'^urdtriJ 
inrfimtJiii'n iin jnii-nn;]! ^liIldamL'4H4l^. tri^cvMniSMun 
lidci, iV'Mpi^- lind CLiusli'iKlion m1 mif^; jiaicQi^a.'i. 

AROI^ Aniama Compenciyfn VoL 1 M^u^riak 
in icfbcaK ijuMfc. ioofs. ysfia^ r«."ilik:itl 'j/i' jmLii 
OA*!. Kita9>>, Sautb C^ait^ ^iriiiij polArfraih^a 
SitiJt 

Af^54S AnTef¥ia Compel^ um Vol 2 C^1»? 
^utKilb^ Y'tp'^- tfixLv imLlubad mi fanmJKvd lyv 

AR2e36 Companion Software for Antenna 
Cofnp«ndium VoJ. 2 J L4' ^t^-LM>^ iloppj 

AR4ai7 Anlenoa Compendkym Vol, 3 More 
VL'rtauh. Y'^^is. i\viMls. pEu^ Ic^ips. Uirrjys. nnnbilc^ 
(ji^rcctkm rinding, Lonirolliifd cuir*=nii>. ttprnpuu'ri/L'd^ 

iBStJttlatkin, iivcrknids. pluN 40 ni'-w striiLk-N lor 

UHF/VHF/PACKET\ 

ARTSCI U.S. Repeater Haphook hv Rtthrn 

Martm The Guidi- Itit tmioiinp railiti jihullui s S9.?S 

TPtkOI Thv Basic Guide la VHF/l^lfF Hani 
Rddia frv l^iuft/ M- .ViitZI PttA idirs a tirsi rale ui- 
innJiiNnjuii 10 ihc If^ ami 1.2;^ ihl'Ut biodik a-v well 
ailil. .U,*f»dTamS655 

A3i3B!5@ Your l^ket Conpanioft h^act riv die 



heginner'^ in udviuio^id. %14M 

AR46S1 Antennas and Techniques for Low- 
Sand DXIng iL ,111 k yiiur LictcL t^v low-biind sut^ivMs, 
Driiw-'itiLi nil thi' I'Jiperiuiia^ ol' sutttssfiil DXeni md 
tfw uuiii-n's own iijinnsidcnihli: *i^pL'rifJ3a\ Jcihn IV 
volikrc. (.]N4L,iN, \hm:s Ok" lip& and ic'rhniqui-s i!]Ai 
(an maki' ihc ilttnaTJit? k'lw(VQ u ^uii- n lJui tak^ 
pan bt 9 iVitieit wd * nk' ihni «l m ii! ^JJ^i , lh i 

AR381@ Pfiiysicsl Desj^ of Ya9i Aid^^n^ At 
DmiJ E. ijftMin WttQIi^ [Finiib^ itn- k^oJs tkcir lo 
ilfia«a asd buiU Mhsft Ya^ aideiniSh u-sio* Hjunit 
iOiacbaucil ca^tkL^L^rin* pnaciplts. ¥ou nwd »o 
ic^cF tear dk^ antsL-^^ix-aos uf mdl or kx catenas i* 
ynr wbniHs. W14J1 iht.^ irtwawiif. joi «■ bu|i| oi 

^W261S WiFB't Antenna Notebook h flnr 

trnsivif wiTiT i^L'tJoiufA and vt-TUcjlv. DulLJ mtkiT^ dud 
SWRhri%fs SiMt 

WGPa71C}7 All About Vertical Antennas^-v 
Wifiiiint Off CiimT:irf hL'n?iivL: ciivciage of imiiti.'ui' 
4X;iiiunuiiLiC4)ions. SEL.Vfi 

W6PB7042 Beam Antenna Handbook *¥ 

WiU'tiun On- ittuf Simirf O'wnn EvLiyiiiiii^ you nei'd 
It] kmiw lihdul K'lim dt-HijiTi, i.uiLNtnjtlion. ;mii iiptTn- 
ticra. Sli.95 

WGP87077 Simple. Low-Cost Wire Antennas 
For Radio Amateurs f ■> Wiilinm On anJ Si mm 
Cituim Ail Nl'K'* Uw-cnM. imdii-haiM! anifniuiNH in- 
cKpirtiiivif Ix'jms, "InviijWt*' anl^naf kv hjnn is 
~iai^' l(%4iikiibl Nf u iLda. S1U5 

Af^200 AiiliOfi» ImpMlanee IblcMng h tor 
J^a^ A', Cmrm lyftM t^-inprL'twQ^i^c huik lintbii *m 
^ng ,Sflui}i Lliam ia ^fia* impedaut nuiiiitiii 

AR^tO Vagi Antefvia Desi^i Aikmi^^we- 
no. poiistuftl ^ expanded h% Ilr Lxbtw*- S15Jt 

AR2995 R«ftec1ion5 ^^ help i&pd dh.' tuU-mnhs 
ami Dutniihl in>tlis liiat many Minr are tne ahmi 
triBisniiLv\iiiin lint^. -Jjiiilin^ 'm j^cs. aniennit maScbtn^; 
Evflixted pMwcr 4fld 4nii.'niM [tmiini. S2AJdO 

AR3118 Reflections -Son* arL' for IBM 5 IM" 



AR3978 Your VHF Companion Esplijfi: tin- fawi 
naun^ iHTliulJi-s di4] Itk' Vjlf bands. FM Jdid ftTX^iii'n. 
packfl. CW & SSB. Ssudliifs. ATV, imii&miih'r Imnl 
m£ mJ iDifc $8.00 

03802 RTTY TnHy ^* ifcne /npr,*n A:-f7*'/ Mas 



BOOKS FOR BEGINNERS 



TAB43&4 The Beginner's Handbook of 
Amatnir flwMn, HM Edition bx Out Lskt 
WSZfV. 395 p^es^ Wootkitiil r* n i fur oiiibviiin- 
CTS. It u ttuk and wcU iHiiiLniit'd Evfn 1I y\m 
have aQ die athtT hnm hitmSKHikii^ ynu^ It sull tlnd 
ib^ QUI! UM,'ful $22^ 

W5GWNC Technician Class License INanu- 
al; New No- Cod© by Goriitm Wm This hiH>k 



cxamfBtfHiOi B IdwihJ m ihri imf houL PCC FnrSI 
6lf>applfCJtii]ii 59.95 

XTAL-1 me Crystal Set Handbook by PHii 
Anderson WOXi. ^ ^ni lu ^i^^e .1 kni jn L-XLiiinf 

preivenl'.* Or may he ytiiin»i-in CryiiaJ ^ets iicv -iilive 
iind (un Here's a whisk- book packi^d wiUi (.ry^Ul 
iiii cia'Jilfi ihiil unyiinc^'an kiild Nthw liiart saving 

thtisy Enjiinical Ntst's. rhkay'!" I ?A pugi^ SUh^S 



AR4M5 Satcffilc AMbolifir Thr latira tDfintuui^ 
I III fiSCARs 9 OKllifh ( ^ t!^ ttvll i^ dh: R!v sudblc^ 
ihr b^ ul dffiiat nuidc's. ttixlrttE jidLiDie,. RLDAJL 

AR448LlWcidM!rSa(M(U«eUintbookl4thE:dJ t^ 
Ur Xaipk TaggiBi "^Asmjt Eipandal uod i^tsed t» 
fienni. ipdjy'i wc»ibcT-lliJ(. sale Jlttc tecb»ol(>fy. 

AR4j6i5? Camptumi SoAwjir? fur M t-Jibrr Salcffii« 
Baiulhqqt 5 1/4^ M^PCIS Mtippy %\%m 

kVa\m LomplKle tfXVr Uiid td.J /rv /lri^ toritrr 
Vt^Vi^'/ Lcom b(>w cu tiuni DX aikl nhiiiiTi tlml-[L^gi:t 

AR37f>2 Vf>iir yUP OpLnitinK t (Wiipiiniwn Nn spi: 
cial riys iw: e.ipensivt5 uqiiijtiiiL'iu m t»njoy ihe *!:xl'lEl*- 



itK'ni sal 1 hxlk'sgc' of ki^ ^pt ivtcr 1 fi£T#un£ 'S^.tM 
ARiJi^ QRPCIuhq C«iiriJ4A« .J ARRL pwl*- 
tJiiiin, itn Nityinf re«"CTii:, irapMnttt^is. traa&- 

twvcrs. A.v^»SMflcs. SUM 

AR-I2?t1 FTC liilt Voek A nust tit t^r^ry »m! 
rasbo an&itiiijr S9.D0 

ARU.15« M«fK CwIf: Thf EvurntM Lduifwgf 

by L ppir*' ftrrmtu Jr. W3Dk\ tAfuikkd jcid rv- 
vi?«uj ID its 2ndi ififitioiL Ikw ki tunik diMn>.v cjlb 
hirard oiK uiily on fhu hjiinhjnds but un 
titiirtlimi' ami dunrafl Tn^iifuieicks StJO 

AR^^iS^ Lnderi^Uitdiii^ Baiiit Elfctrniitcs 
All ARRL knnk. M4 hii; |lJgi->.. T?li?i f^pliim^, every ■ 
llliiij; very sirtipty: die iiudi, CH.', AC. lr;in^j.sliirs, evLn 
UdK'^ 4woUt'!|i Din chL'q> ui 517, Isn'i 11 iihout EiEre 
you UiKtmiiKKl \hv fundiinnrntiilh''' SI 7, (Ml 



IVA/A/E WRITES = 

WGl We The Pcflpir Wfrftfr* H*i- On Our 
Lousy Governiatiii U^^ snlJ tuvcr. Thn i!. 
Vh'a>Tk:':» nrpijn [!J(,pLunin^ utui the mjjtir fstiUcllfe 
are lACins k*h Scvt Hampiluie ind the ccunary, 
awl proposisf linnpli;. iiic%f)cn«ivc sohitjoii^: m. 
sat^ vfty ubwc fimniMfM di.-fwtBoie happi- 
ly cm ibca ■' ■ ! ■<■■■ ■ ijy 50% wtLbu ibice jfcm; 
b.nA 10 cQi tfar cdst of MHsmsraiaf prisoao s h^ 
<n-a: 90^; hov lo cikl Mtrlf jnr, )ki* Id iTdiiL'e dif 
defico. huw 10 ctfi nvcSKa] ciwit^ and in^vm^ lic^difa 
che; faeF« to out sdionl o^ii and iin|iTn-i^ sdioalh. 
An ih^dkifai: ^leiJ dl SD 

WG4 20(20 FoTEJ^I^I^Tu^CflLy I6p updnes w 
iIm: Drclart War liOQli^320p. Funbin^ pmposah 
fw Sfftvmg cnlicai Airvi^rie-in prnhlems. F:uch is a 
new uppn'Nidi to tlnancm)! snmLI hu^intriha-^, hi>w to 
liiuinee Ru^^iii and iJiher i;oLiniriL^ and make a pr;>[- 
IL duin^ iU Ihc rt'Ui diipe <H] hii,K?lL\:m>:iiiiignedL'St ii 
hjcw kind of ptilyiuchnitiil univi^rsaty. a iw-w t;li!t 
Ucmics icehnotogy, why Afncii i?; iQ .'iUi'hi ;i mc*S!ii. 
why Pcro* bnmhLiJ, hi.m in hiive tui turn- free uiiiKf- 
^j|li's. ;a plan liir Fniikiii^ (.\tn^'res'^ lum hoEiL';!i4. eic 
Plrniy wove. RiJiLiiLNisly ptittxl al SID. 



WG5 SulnnaiiDt LHc rn HWIl- i^)p Wt^s 
i*iory ut hi^ idveniure^ un lilt I'SS Drain 
SS-22K udr fivr wo: pitnds iii dw (WiJx m l*MV 
45. Wbil'a n nc^EIy tike oft a \uhminac wbcn 
yau*pc hcin^ ic pita ctiar^d"^ And chit's ihc 
day to 'day lite nn 2 submirine like ' Did yon 
ser the mwic Chb Bout :* F-«<ilWt ilutt iHiL <Mly 
$7 J* 

WG6 L>Kk Wayw'A Ciffiibciin .\ilv^iiium^ 
96p WayiK\ jdvcdmin Hjutu divinf 2U jnimd 
Ilif CainliheM, viskinf Jum optraiuf!!, afid siflii:' 
ircing. Ir yuu^rt iniea'iiied tn fh*^ lo invel eco- 
DMllKsUy, you'll ^<a siiinie greui hk'js liTfUi dm. 
He MMia uut with his '^Diving, the Wimp SptTrt^ 
YtHirt] kiVL' ihe visits to tl isldmh in 2t days Irip. 
A mciisiK S730. 



W07 Uiwlf Wayne's Tra¥ebr-.^2p Wayne l/iiv- 
ch lii RiiN-^iu. I j( mi Ion, Aspen. Si. Pierre^ MuniLrh. 
Vk-nnn. Kraiitiiii. nhii Pra^M<! wtiluiiii ii eosiing 
oeorty a^ itwrJi as )Oii mi^hi iliink. Cheap for ytMj 
tcmj. at S5*W. 



CODE TAPES = 

73TD5 "Genesis" %SM S ^^m-Tbai be^n- 
Mmg t^v, [Aa )*m ihTiiueJi thr lb klKfS. It) nun^ 
hcrsL aid Kcsszy pnBCUidUuc. (inniietc wiib pac- 
tkt every stfpd'ite «>ir. 

73Tt)6 -T?ie Stickler- S5 95 ** w^™— Thi^ is 
dk.^ frjLnH.e LJpf ft»f thtw? wl»i iurfi%i3d di? 5 wpaB 
Lif^-, jDd it's alscv thi:^ titpn Ut Ihe ^ia^« aid Tecfahk 
CTU lifCtssciS. tl is coiiiprtM?U oi one solinl hour ul 
awk. Chafadep* apf sci Ji J3 *pin :nid ^aitd ^ 5 
wpoi 

73T13 "8aak Breaker'^ $$.95 13+ wpm— Codt 
groups y.^iin. Lit ij brisk H-f wpsii h.i vuiril bL' Tt'aJly 



d ea»<' wtk'i Villi fii dcmrn in Cnmi of ;i ^indy -rjnd 
^iliMcar eumiiier vlu sa(& ^'Diiiiu: ) ^4 ptaa Is- 
ftiiff (Mfe A i«h II per. 

73Ta "^Cduragaous" S59S ^ufaCii^pai- 
ulUkw^i l^ifiTy, the ckA. _ < codr i» «tyi'i. ^ottn 
yA dm ^. H> dim'i i|ifli EH>u G» iur the »iea etas 
licet^ We tend i&t oodif faMer ch^jo 2t) pi^ 

73T25 "T?ie Hind Baggier ' S5.§5 25* wptn 
l^enilisbly gL^ncnited by tinJiy t^d tikii^ Wi^ne fur 
hjiTfcs with it jiunna nei.nl hw stlt ptimshinenL OtKt 
yiiti vib com^ucT^d 25 per kH Link kndW it ytiu n^vJ a 
Ml wpm tape. 



lUncle Wayne's Bookshelf Order Form I 

Ynj may ordiT hy iiuiil. tclcphoni?. or tax. All piivpncnis are lu be in Uil lllnll^ Allow A _ 
w©?k,s for delivery (Prkcs Mjhjcxi tu change w^ithiUJt ninitc il sirpplicr^i JnirL'av: poccji.) H 



Item 



Title 



Qty. 



Prtee 



ShippJny m us orebre add S5GC 5hi(ffir.j- 



SHIPPiNG 

TOTAL 



Total 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

Telephone: (603)924-4117 (800)234-0458 FAX: (603)924-8613 uwo&fl5 
I Mail: Uncle Wayne's Bookshelf, 70 Route 202N, Peterborough. NH 03458 I 



^i^ipi^d: VPS. (Beani pnnfde slreel address ! 
Made checits peygbis to "Uncis Wnyr^'s Boa*si^lf.' 

Foreign Ordegl^ ChOOesOftj: U surface s^iipprig U ti>r shipping. 

(Suffece delivery may lake a JO 3 months,) 
Note: The gel Lfiit foreign ghippmg costs will tje additional lo ra^ular shaping and harsflifig lets. 

HYESl Send m 12 issues oi 73 at the low rale of Sl9.9r7, (Save 43% of cover pnca.} 

Canada rtdd $7 plLis Si .40 QST. Forelfln ntki $9 suiiace; ^2-Oii airrnnil 

OYES! Send me 12 'muGs o\ Badio Fun a! the Icwf rate ot Si 2.97. (Save 20% ol cover priGi.) 

Canada add 57 plus $.70 GST Foregn ^itd $12 siirtaee; S3*i00 ainnfliL 



Name 
Street 
City _ 



State 



Zip 



TOTAL S 



L. Check-Woney Oittef 



_ AE _ MC - VISA StO minimum fof cfedit t^rd orttefs 
Card - ^^ EKpinatton Date 



Signature 



PiTone # — 



«■■ 




1-800 

426- 2891 



**««•«**•**• 



* • » 



FAX <G 1 2> 786 • 65 1 3 





IKAUNCO 



W Delivery 
'^it n 12 Rh in Com>a«itti USA 






Call Tii»av! 



Call For Catalog 
Ask For Ext. 11 



« • « 



« « * 



PUONK HOIJIIS 

W\ »A»i-8t>ii 

Sa'iv 10am'5i*m 

CST 



En [:^iiiiL It 



"Every 

time the dollar 

gets weaker we cannot 

buy as many goods as 

As of this writing ttiere is a 9,2% decrease 

in the dollars purchasing power and the future 

appears uncertain. If you are on the fence of buying, 

don't put it off any longer. Stay tyned." 



o 

ICQM 



DJ-»8:>1 




Tills tiny HT is 

a fesTyre 

Eack&d dual 

design 

conibirmd with 
CTCSS & 
UTMF pajjinQ. 

sensEtivily and 
great audio 
ETiake? for a 
gfeatFidw 
coittpmioin 



im-iriMi' ':tB»''^ 



Cnannd 



l>K-tiO«T 



XK'VMMt >54rt|ir-2am nit;^^ 



IC-ZIA 



B 



:yt3u S0« wfijA^ 



or 



ttaopenmQ . ^ , ^ 

1 

mefer 

mobile 

spons 

features you 

need- Power 

QuMs 5D vyatts 

wtth OTMF mic. 

CTCSS encode. 

trnjcftH^ h^^ware and 

pOWcf 



T*iiS plus ths 
featursa Alinco 
makss starHJard 
are youra 
agraai 
package 




This easy to use dual 
bander is jam packed with 
special feat j res like 
simultaneoLE^ dual tand 
receive, deiachatjie I'ronl 
panel, femoie aperiLion 
and inucri. mud) xnore 



* 



3«»' lDR-]:iOT*2»!l 



KENWOOD 







Thisnw 

MO 
NewNMHi 
2 \ dual bard feaiures 
t!i6ier/ \ sefamtE Suning, 
Tttem dualXvolLi'me & squalch 
baDd mobile X^ontrate for eacti 
wilt! fsmovableX band, 100 
front panel, \ memories, 
separate contnils \ arid ^ifln 
lor turjLnii'yoluine \ power 
^id^uakt^. Hifflcie \ wt 
Qontrol 



1C-270IIII 



Tliis 

mobile has a 1^ / fy« to 

portrWDMHz /intarmod 
rsflQive, 60 / a hi to 60 
mernories, auto /memories, 50 
diaJgr, auto off/ wstts CTCSS 
direct / encode, aipha 
frequiJTcy/ numrk; dtspfay & 
ejitry. 4/ moreThis urirt oWtrs 
rrwre /c|FB3t feslures ^ tun as 
bonrjs 



u:-2iiooB \'t2n 



A buFit In 

Spl^akcr mike 

witn 104 
memaritis, 
paging, VV/ 
ULI and moro 
TI1& greai 
stylir^g and 
grsat Teatjres 
\i%\ needs 





i4 



i(:-7:t8 



ic-i:Mi 



lO^GXAT 



IM7I2A 




VHF/ 

UHF 

trt* 

bander wttfi ttiird t^and 

optional includes many 

enltaficefnefTis sucti as. 

d(f«Ct fTBtjuency entry, 

CTCSS encode. DT^F 

rerrwn cimln}! and nuKit, 

mudi tnoR. AE^ in^labfe 

in a trf-bamj model 

TM'942A 



ni-7tti(i») 



This sliiT Hne 
dua^ Zander 
sports a dol- 
matrix LCD [for 
a perfect Alpha 
numeric 
display). 82 
memams, non- 
voiaule memofy 
witt5 ID, DISS, 
DTMF & CTCSS 
V/V4U/U 
ffl«iVB & 'FET* 
power make 
this a winner. 




73-005 



This affordable 
2 m&l&r 

t kk ^ 



provides wWb 
' ttf!J tjand r*c6ive. 
20 mentories 
3TMF pad & 
: 1 : "^g 3 nd 
u^:,QrxAJ lorte 
! sqitelcti Battery 
&3¥e, auto 
ijower afi. pUDnrv waKh 
and 3 power levels maJ^t 
ihis a fun machinp as well 




loom do&s II again witfi a 
new radio wortn the word 
"Grear utilising DCS 
technology^ 1 Hz ot milling 
res42laticin is disfii^^ 
wFth VOX. RF gain, 100 
wan. 10? mQfTtories. qutch 
$l>lit auto antsflnd tuning, 
dual CW poits a;id more 
stack up to a featu^ 
packed HF liQ. 




Here's the H,F, rig youVe 
t>een hoEding out fori It 
features a full 1Q0 watts 
oulput from 160 meters 
Ihroujgh 6 meters with a 
tjuitt in antefina tuner and 
power supply, VOX. FBI, 
RF Gain. 101 mefrioms 
and more provrdes you 
^m irie Istesl teatures 
and fun 




lU 







Hlgti 

power 

\ 

com p net - FT^ 
design set a 
new 

performance 
pace. This new 
HI otters 40 
mfimoriss, ^w, 
cast cas«. 
CTCSS trs 
frtists and 
extiting from 
Icom 



^rm^^ 



B 



P 






n ;iin/:M 



FllB% tun. bc/l yoo can be vdry 
Mflous with this heavy di/ty 
competitof. Doal receivers^ 200 
watt OLTipLit 99 msmones and 108 

dS dynamic range Qivci you line 
performancs edge. 




The WW FT-990 Combirws the 
basic toctniical feaiurss 0I ttiat 
top-ot'tt]e-fine modef with severat 

new advances in botti iran^mitier 
and receiver cirtultry, DiQitaJ hltefn 
90 memDNes. wide dynamic range 

and much morej 



«20!)tt'- 



tjpnary HfF tfaf»sc*iver whicfi 
ansunr^ the call for a truly 
practical rrkobile ractio, tts unique 
remoie-head construction allows 
installation where no otlrer 
trartsceivef can be mourned. 100 
watts, 1(H) mtmories, doal VFO'Sh 
IF t^lotch and many mora features. 

* FT- 900 



i;t4J)'^ 




S4TE 



This new 

HT pacics 

tne featyfes 
y0u waift in a 
small si^ \\ feacores 
a new alptianupr^ent 
display, soper smai 
profile, new square 
"0* toatter^' design, 
lit keypad, AM air 
cratt receive. OSQ & 
CTCSS encode. 



%\\\ 



ifniif 




This new H.I 
is tbe world's 
smallest dual 
tender, FET 
eutpbl. E^ck tit 
kiymd. V+V. 0+U ^ ^^ 
atntli-VopQfaiiiig 
modes phts^menu guide. 
Specfrascg/M^. CTt;SS 
encode, DTMF psging, 
120 memories, cloning, 
SIS (ask) and so much 
more you iiave iq hold 
and try it! 



FT-51/38 



*503 



.55 



P 

M 

B 

e 



FT-7:MiK 



rT-r>io(> 



This new transceiver delivers the 
fun and perlomnance youie 
looking for while staying on a 
budget! It has 100 watt output, 
100 memories, ODS, IF Shift FET 
front end and a ge^ieraJ co^/erage 
roceiver. 





Satolliie and all-mode 3m/7D€m 
wortt gels exciting with this tull- 
teature transceiver, linked tuning, 

12 uniink memories, 100 
msmorles, artd 2 aplional modules 
offers band extensions for 6m, 
220MHJ. on. 2 GHz operation. 






This dual t>3nc! mobile tealures 

100 memories, cross band repeat ^ 
lighted keypad, bailt-iTi duplexer 
and 3 sntall tootprint Dual watch 
capability rounds out this 50/35 
watt VHF/UHF transceiver. Packet 
rsady. 



^i\ 1 il»M 



This riew 2 nflcler mobiie tjorrows 

Its ruggedness from liie n-2400H 

wiiilB adding great new features 
siicfi as advajice track tuning, 
time out limer. A, P.O.. 9600 bps 
option, 31 memories, the new 
"omni-glow" LCD display and 
morel 



Theiwwest 
member o( 
the doal 
barvd ramity. 
This handhe^ 
spdm auto tone 
searcfi. 83 memory 
-!-.:^nnels, automatit; 
power offj built-in 
VOX, dual jn-t)aiid 
receive laatore, built-in 
cross band repeat 
function and much 
more. 



(ii» 




e 

9 
9 




doo^ tuvf tinw ID naks 



Autitonzed f icIofv Warranty Center 

||ifiniltxlQry«ibafbN«nnv^rniiiiOitvlcvn,lC«M«ori«iiY^aa W^Hrvinatin^Kaidiindi^Ourcufiiiniefsinay stndvtv&'odiici 
lM^llirteK.1Mitot«iiMtDf fendttiltMMpoijrcusiQfner?^^ rm}ff f UT1 Has tai^ in Ilii hably Hfoii'aMdtailomcu^i^r 
E, lit tt A i fir !«. CAF 1 V AiiS. oo^ a* tfb »i-i<i^it)4^ m vas^'^Mtk ritei 10 MfMssd ^imm Atly 

2663 Couttty RMri t M^ifHts View. MN 5511? Store Hours: M-F, 10:00 iin-§ 00 pm. Sat.: WM am^S:{IO pm 

MMro: {6lZ)78i&-4475 •Nat1 Witb: t-S{ID-42&-2S91 • FAX: (6l2)7&fi'65l3 Phone Haurt: M-F, 3:00 z^lM pm. Sal.: \%M %w%M pm 



Not Resportsible Fdr Typogfaphical Errtrs. 



\ \\A Itl. 

V - ki Fllli; 



Expires 
May 
19^ 




PrKes Subject To Change W^thoui Notice. 



B 

m 

8 
8 



CIRCLE 153 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



m/70cm Mobiles 



1 



t 



I 



^ 02[}pV 
55 0,15 mV 



ylsitle, \t>u can easily see why the 
FT-25^il)M stands up io the shock and 
vibration like no othcn W% engineered the 
first mobile radio to meet the rigid stan- 
dards set bv^ the LS MiliUry back in the 
'80s, and that same critical design is in the 
FT-250OM, From the simplified imni panel, 
rubber coated knobs, durable pebbled finish 
coating, and huge Onini-Glow''^ display to 
the one-piece die-cast chassis, the 
FT-250OM can take whatever yuu throw 
at it! 

Inside, the electrical circuitry meets 
standards so uncompmmising the FT-250(IM can 
respond like oo other radia Built-in 3- Stage 
Advance Track Tuning (ATTh automatically 
relunes from 140 to 174 Ml I? permitting consistent 
receiver sensitivity across the entire band. 

But there's more. Like alpha-numeric display capa- 
bility! Lets yt>u program a frequency or a 4 character 
name on any of the 31 memories. With three selectable 
power output levels and up to 50 watt power output, 
the FT-25()0M extra large heat sink means forced air 
cooling is not necessary. And, as a bonus, Ya^su's 



"Just look inside. Military spec 
really means something to Yaesul" 



Graph depicts contir^ucHiS tuning across entire bamJ 




CBJTBlFReO 



TIMS 



TO 144 lib 




CENTBtFREU 
TO 156 




njHe)t0i68UH2J 




136 



H5 



<5? rS9 \m 

FREQUENCY (MHz) 



m 



lao 



3 -Stage Advince Track Tuning (ATTJ - The e^tclusive 3 -Stage Advance Track 
tun, rig front efid automatical adjusts tJand wdtti sensitivity across tfte eMir§ 
recefver range, wtiile maintaning setecuvity specilicatiDns ATT signrficar% 
reduces intertErence tmm inter -modulatHDn a/wt front end overfoad 



"A QST review says 'the FT-2500M 
exhibited supehor 10 MHz offset 
IMD dynamic range of 103 db!"' 



:rr\' 



axclusive backlit DTMF mic comes with e\^ery FT-2500M 

Experts say the FT-25^)(*M is the only commercia - 
grade amateur radio available So^ for tough manufactur- 
ing standards, inside and out. with true FM clarity, and 
outstanding performance, the FT'25U0M is yt^ur mobile. 



YAESU 

Performance without compromise!^^ 



"This Advanced Track 
Tuning praGticaliy 
eliminates intermod!" 



L 



f- 
* 



L 



"Yaesu did it again; 



M 



u V-*". 



FT-2200/7200 

Just 5.5 W X 1 .6"H X 6.5"D, the FT'2200/7200 
radios are designed to fit into today's more 
compact cars with ease, 

SPECIFICATIONS ♦ Frequency Coverage: 
FT-22t)0RX: ]l(M80MHl.TX: 144-148 MHz. 

rr^iim rxtx: 430450 m\z. • wide 

Receiver Coverage: 110-180 MHz • W 
"Aircraft" Receive: 110*139 MHse • Buiit4n 
DTMF Paging/Coded Sqmkb • Sekctable 
Channel Onlv Di^plav • 10 Memory DTMF 
\[itr, Dialer • B^ckl it DTMF Mic • Pcfvwt 
I ^uiput 50,-20/5 Wiilts ^FT 7Jf Ki :i5/l5/5 Watts} 
■ 5y Memon' Channels • He mote Operation 
w' Optional 'M\V-2 • LTCSS EfKode Built-in 
* iDptiona! Digital Voice Storage S>^tem. 
Accessories: See yo^r authorized Vaesu dealer. 






- H 



4 



/ 



*^ 



jf^ 



\ 



.n 



f^ 



«^ 



^-. ©^ 



%i 



\ 




POWER 



QW CO 



mntiifllll 



Specifications 



Frequency Coverage: 
R-2500M 

RX: 140-174 MHz 

TX: 144-148 MHz 
R-740QH 

RX/TX: 430-450 MHz 
Rugged Mffltary Spec Design 
Advanced Track Tuning (ATT) 
Selectable Alpha-Numeric 



* Omni-Glow"** Display, largest 
available 

* Power Output 

FT-2500M 5a^0/5 WatTS 
Fr-7400H 35/1575 Watts 

• Rip Up Front Conlrol Panel 
hides seldom used buttons 

- Backlit DTMF Mic 

• 31 Memory Channels 

• CTCSS Encode Built-in 

* Automatic Power Off {APOr 

• Tlme-Out Timer (TOT)" 
« Manual* or ALftomalic 

Backlighting Adjustment 

* Accessories: 

FP-800 20 Amp HD Power 
Supply w/ Front 
Mounted Speaker 
FRC'6 DTMF Paging Unit 
FTS-17A CTCSS Decode Unit 
SP-4 External Mobile 
Speaker w/ Audio 
Fitters 

^FT-2500M 







iU - 






sot 






/ 



VOL,^ 



/f 



F/W 



"^aksu 



■^^WBcajtff 



f'T-SSQoftfl 



I SpiCfncations^suHiecr lo^^nQC v^^i .^-ui mTRce. SpecjItcaiHifis guaf^ooKG ui».f . .Limi ams^f band's^ Some aecessones and 1}t ogtioR^ »fe stindyrd In ceiLa ■ . ^f t^as: Chectr urttK your local H^u ctea!^''^^'^'^"-'' 



T|l8t3ii& 






The Pacesetter In Amateur Radio Proudly Presents The 



i 



I 



i 



i 



I 



4 



^^irfif$'fi 






GRAND PRIZE-DX Wheels 




-ri—' - . \. 



j ' ^ < gM % i i ^ i ■ l i ri I 





^'^t'^J! 



J" ^ 



Eqi»f3fnefit. cdfif aird accessories ma^ ^sry. 



eiv 



msa/i Pathwwef j 

Custom equipped with: Kenwood TS-50S, Kenwood TM-742A, Kenwoo 
with CD-MD Ciianger Control and KDC-C603 Multiple CD Changer 



ilLlEMillilffiECmiiayRV^rafi 




^m\mm%rml VSi^llHCi^l 



%' L JB^-w > 



FjIM^^^J I I 



ZnlEriui 

DX Trip for 2 to 1996 Kenwood Cup 
Honolulu, Hawaii 




M Priffl 

$1 ,000 Kenwood Amateur Radio 

Shopping Spree 






TS-50S 



TH-79A(D) m-733A 



nultta and Reguiatlon^^ S.ve? 

5iival0(io 10 Kofiwanri l.i 

law. MlisI hfl 18 yflarstar older to mu- 



5, 199S Vi^it -.'^'.fr iLrthnr^^*(! K^nvvnii^j Aniflie^jr Ri3r' 



TiLiriics: 



.■iiihibit^ti by, 



KENWOOD COMMUNICATION'^ rnponDftTroM 

AMA'I • 
PQ Bm 2S74S. 220.I E Domn 



R*;.- 



L> J J^'^".,'L- M' ■ 



ts^tii^vvOOD ELEC uiumiuS CAnau^ Lf^^u, 



95ARD'T139